Kaspar Hauser: The Foundling of Nuremberg

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Chelsea, Tilling, printer, 1832 - 164

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Strona 76 - It is, I think, agreed by all that Distance, of itself and immediately, cannot be seen. For, distance being a line directed endwise to the eye, it projects only one point in the fund of the eye, which point remains invariably the same, whether the distance be longer or shorter.
Strona 76 - a judgment or conclusion, that the object I see " beyond them is at a great distance. Again, " when an object appears faint and small, which " at a near distance I have experienced to make " a vigorous and large appearance ; I instantly " conclude it to be far off. And this...
Strona 77 - ... experience than of sense. For example, when I perceive a great number of intermediate objects, such as houses, fields, rivers, and the like, which I have experienced to take up a considerable space, I thence form a judgment or conclusion that the object I see beyond them is at a great distance. Again, when an object appears faint and small, which at a near distance I have experienced to make a vigorous and large appearance, I instantly conclude it to be far off: And this, Tis evident, is the...
Strona 76 - I find it also acknowledged that the estimate we make of the distance of objects considerably remote is rather an act of judgment grounded on experience than of sense. For example, when I perceive a great number of intermediate objects, such as houses, fields, rivers, and the like, which I have experienced to take up a considerable space, I thence form a judgment or conclusion...
Strona 136 - I was just thinking, how many beautiful things there are in the world, and how hard it is for me to have lived so long, and to have seen nothing of them ; and how happy children are, who have been able to see all these things from their earliest infancy, and can still look at them. I am already so old, and am still obliged to learn what children knew long ago.
Strona 39 - Here he first learned, that, besides himself and ' the man with whom he had always been,' there existed other men and other creatures. As long as he can recollect, he had always lived in a hole, (a small, low apartment, which he sometimes calls a cage,) where he had always sat upon the ground, with bare feet, and clothed only with a shirt and a pair of breeches.
Strona 97 - ... been accustomed in his prison; — for his bread was seasoned with these condiments — all kinds of smells were more or less disagreeable to him. When he was once asked, which of all other smells was most agreeable to him? he answered, none at all.
Strona 5 - He was hence soon regarded as a kind of savage; and, in expectation of the captain's return, was conducted to the stable, where he immediately stretched himself on the straw, and fell into a profound sleep.
Strona 13 - If he had parents (which he has not) he would have been a scholar : only show him a thing and he can do it.

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