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and before leaving him, offered up a prayer at his bedside. Half an hour before he departed, he said to his mother, a heathen: *Dear mother, be quite easy about me, and don't mourn to excess; after death, I shall go to my God and Savior; but one favor I ask of you, that you would faithfully embrace every opportunity of hearing the word and will of God from the missionaries. Believe what they tell you about God, and do every thing they teach you—it is the truth. They strive to promote our temporal and spiritual welfare and salvation.” In this frame of mind he breathed his last. We confidently trust that the Savior has heard his prayers and received him into glory; and if so, how great must have been the joy of our late Sister Gambold and of the angels in heaven, at seeing the soul of this poor youth, “one who was lost, but now is found,” enter the mansions of bliss. Sunday 28. This evening, Bear-meat, son of the old chief Sour-mush deceased, paid us a visit in order to take his son Willy, one of our scholars, home for a season. We much

Seventh Report of the United Foreign Missionary Society.

SEPT.

regret that these visits of children to their parents, where they often stay for months tegether, occur so frequently. But the Indians being independent characters, will earry their opinions, although we do not negleet to remonstrate with them on the subject, because we have to feel the sad effects of such protracted visits at home. 30. Our neighbor Tussewallety and his wife Ajosta, together with her sister, brotherin-law, and uncle Cananthoah, came hither with the express design of hearing something about God. Brother Schmidt conversed with them for several hours, giving them a brief description of the birth, life, sufferings, and death of Jecus, and declaring to them the great love of God revealed in Christ Jesus to poor sinners, while he secretly and fervently prayed to the Lord to fill their hearts with His love. Our sister Mary, who with her mother afterwards added some remarks, seted as interpreter, and the whole company appeared to be much affected. (To be Continued. J

pomestic outtuinture.

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serted the camp of the adversary, have at length publicly enrolled their names under the banners of the cross. Of your little church at Seneca, we may sing in the sweet strains of the Psalmist—This and that man was born in her; and the Highest himself shall establish her. The Lord shall count, when he writeth up the people, that this man was born there. In commencing our labors, we did not anticipate an exemption from trials and discouragements. We expected that our faith and patience would often be put to the test. We looked for systematic and persevering opposition. In computing the cost of oar enterprise, we were constrained from a know of the history of Christ's kingdom on

# to make an affiietive calculation of isoer.

ence and defection among the possed friends of the eanse. But we did no ine, it is frankly confessed, that or seventh anniversary, your fundswooo

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1824. Revivals of Religion.--Monthly-Concert Lectures. o

own Institution continue to be settered in its urevival, sixty-eight have already been received operations, by the want of a prompt and am-il into the communion of the church. su o | In the town of Montgomery containing only We have looked forward to the day, when seven hundred inhabitants, one hundred prowe should convey our missionaries, in the fessto have been the subjects of resenerating path that God in his Providence is openius, grace, during the recent emision one Holy across the desert, and beyond the Rocky || Spirit in that place. Mountains. We have anticipated a liberality || In the Union Association, the towns of in our churches, that would reproach the in- Randolph, Braintree, and North Middleactivity of their managers, and propel us borough, have been graciously visited from on onward, from tribe to tribe, until our Stand-ihigh. In those places the power of divine ard-bearers shall list up their banners, in the truth has been signally displayed. Many have name of our God, on the shores of the Pacifie!|been cut to the heart, and forced to ery Should this he accomplished—should our ani- "what must 1 do to be saved,” and many mating anticipations be realized—still, how | have found consolation and joy at the feet of small a portion of the wealth of these large|the Redeemer. About one hundred and and opulent churches would be consecrated toll thirty have made a public profession of religthe service of Jehovah? And yet should this lion. In the towns of llorchester, Milton, and be accomplished—the dwellers in a thousand Bridgewater, much seriousness prevails; a Pagan villages, would “rise up and call you || spirit of prayer is evineed; there are many blessed.” “The wilderness, and the solitary is anxious inquirers, and very encouraging evi. Place would be glad, and the desert would ||dences are afforded, that the means of grace rejoice, and blossom as the rose.” Who | are attended with a blessing from on high. would not contribute to the accomplishment In Boston and its vicinity, the state of the of so glorious a result! churches calls for devout and lively gratitude. We will not, we dare not, fellow-christians. While we behold the precious fruits of the yield to despondency. In the name of ours late spiritual harvest, we may well say, “what God, we will still plant our banners upon ||hath God wrought.” The additions to three Indian soil. In the name of our churches, well churches in Boston, amount to three huuwill still address the sweet accents of conso-dred and sixty; lation to our consecrated missionaries. we In the Old Colony Association, our brethwill stilleherish the hope, that the long slum-II ren are rejoicing in the consoling evidence, - ber of the churches will soon be broken, and |that God remembers in mercy the land of | that all will arise, in one combined and effi-H the pilgrims. The church in Wareham, the

cient effort, to dissipate the moral darkness, il first urch in Middleborough; and the which has so long enveloped the tribes of this second church in Rochester have enjoyed a

| western continent. special effusion of the Holy Ghost; and two hundred have been added to their communion.

ne-s or ol. IGION. In the Association of Barnstable also, the Granville in Hampden Association has en loord has appeared to bold up Zion; and in

| joyed a precious o of refreshing from the towns of Sandwich, Yarmouth and Chat:

-- - ham, the churches have been revived by his the presence of the Lord.” This work of presence, and many have been added o them of such as, we trust, shall be saved. The South Parish in Andover is now favor. ed with very eneouraging tokens of the divine presence. The o: * - o: class - - has been instrumental of much good in that o o society. Forty have already come forward to on by contess Christ before men and to join them

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times the motives of those who engage issionary work are suspected and imTheir apparent self-denials, labors, ongs are attributed to pride, avarice, or a love of fame. ones the truth of the accounts fury them, as to the ignorance and edness of the heathen among whom well, and the success attending their ors to enlighten and reclaim them, is question and denied. The whole is oted as an exaggerated statement, ino further their sinister and selfish

God first appeared *; the young men in
the nev. T. M. Cooley's school, several of
whom became the hopeful subjects of renew-
no once on the school the sacred in-
ended to both parishes in.

more common suspicion relating to is, that the funds contributed for of Missions are misapplied.

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300 Monthly Conce “They never reach their destined object. They are squandered away on unworthy agents—wasted, in promoting the gratification of those to whom they are entrusted.”

Mr. Pond thinks it would be easy to prove, in regard to all these surmises, “that they are not only unfounded, but malicious, and even ridiculous.” ever, of which the most is made, and on which the greatest reliance is placed, he directs his attention, in this discourse, to that alone. He endeavors to shew, “that the monies contributed in religious charity, have been disposed of, not only with strict integrity, but with great prudence and econ

omy.” We have room for little more than the heads of the argument, which we give nearly in the author's words. 1. never been proved, nor has any credible proof of it been so much as attempted. Q. The manner, in which the charges to be proved are brought forward, affords presumptive |

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evidence of their falsity. They are made indefinitely, and in general terms. “Some Stress that the money which is contributed is misapplied; others have heard a flying report, 1. to the discredit of some unknown, unnamed, and totally undefined individual; others still do not know what becomes of the contributions, but do not believe that they ever reach the object for which they were bestowed.” 3. The known character of those, who are entrusted with the missionary funds, is a sufficient security that these funds are faithfully applied, “Some of the most distinguished divines and excellent civilians of which America can boast, have the care and man*Sement of all our principal charitable concerns.” 4. There is no way possible, in which those who are entrusted with charita. ble funds, can practice fraud, if they are dis. posed to do it, and not be discovered by the whole Christian public. For every contribution a fair receipt is given; is published monthly, quarterly, or annually; and is examined by thousands, by all indeed, who are willius to take the trouble of doing it. And every article of expenditure, also, is noted, a Seneral statement published, and the whole regularly audited. “If people will not examine these accounts, the directors of our charities certainly are not in fault. They publish them—lay them fairly open for examination; and what can they do more?” 5. It is evi. dense that the funds of our charitable institutions are faithfully applied, that the complaint i

As it is the last of them, how- ||

rt Lectures. SEPT.

of mismanagement is not made by those who are best able and most deeply interested to detect and expose it.” “The persons who contribute to our public charities, and who carefully examine all their accounts, are not of a character silently and tamely to suffer imposition. They are a people of many eyes, and ever watchful, if not for their own inter| est, at least for the interest of their beloved Zion. The moment any considerable fraud is practised upon them, they must discover it; and whenever they do discover it, rest assured, ten thousand tongues and pens will be employed to condemn it.” 6. The great things which have been accomplished by those who are entrusted with the public charitable funds, are a living, standing proof that these funds are faithfully applied. 7. Those, who have the care of the charitable funds, are themselves principal contributors to these funds. And s. It is a well known fact, that those who are entrusted with these funds, are not enriched by them. . The author remarks, that he did not bring forward this subject, because he thought the opposition made to the cause of missions on this ground, was at all formidable; not because he expected to silence opposition; nor because the public agents of the church really needed a vindication: but because he desired all true friends to be prepared to aet with light and understanding respecting it. For the filling up of the argument, and for a pointed, but animated and animating conclusions, we must refer our readers to the volume itself. The remaining discourses are upon the advantages of liberality; the oblisations of Christians to the Jews; the idolatry of Chris

| tians; the aggravated guilt of sinning ssainst Rammohun Roy...........Extracts from Sheeches.

light; and the Millennium. But as our suslysis of the preceding discourses has oseupied so much room, we can proceed no further; though there are many thoughts and illustrstions in the unoccupied ground, to tempt us onward. We have given enough of the work to enable each one to form a judgment of its value.

In conclusion, we cannot but remark, that among the multitude of arguments and topics, which this book contains, we have not found an argument destitute of real force, or a misstatement of facts; and we hope the respected author will prosecute a service, which he has so ably commenced, and which is so worthy of the best talents that can be brought to its aid.

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As much is said respecting this celebrated Hindoo writer, in some parts of our country, we have thought that a few remarks respecting him might not be ill-timed; especially as they will consist chiefly of extracts from a communication of one of the most respectable clerical gentlemen in India, to the Society in Great Britain for the Propagation of the Gospel. The gentleman to whom we allude is the Rev. William H. Mill, formerly Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, and now Principal of the Bishop’s College at Calcutta, established under the auspices of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel. Rammohun Roy swerved first from Hindooism to Mohammedanism. Influenced by the light, which missionaries in the first instance had been the means of introducing into Calcutta, he took a distaste to some of the more absurd parts of the Mohammedan Faith, and became a rational Hindoo Philosopher, or in other words, a Deist. It was in this character that he assailed the ancient fabric of Hindoo superstition. We know of no reason to believe, that his views have since been materially changed from those, which come appropriately under the name of deism. Mr. Mill, whose opportunities for gaining correct information respecting him have been very good, asserts that at least he is an infidel. Mr. M. had been speaking of the increasing desire of information among the Hindoos: he then adds:

But there is one appearance of this kind, which, as it bears more immediately upon the great object always before us, I cannot omit: I mean the rise, in different parts of India, of persons, who, on the principles of natural religion only, oppose, in speech and writing, the reigning superstitions of their countrymen, as impious and abominable. These men, who are mostly of high easte as Hindoos, and retain fully their place in society, are not indeed enlightened as to the remedy wanted for the evils which they discern: they mingle often, with their opposition, views respecting satisfaction and atonement, more remote srom the truth than the traditions (however distorted and corrupt,) of the people whom they oppose; and they all want that disposition to undergo sacrifices in the cause of truth, which it seems that nothing but a better hope than theirs is able to inspire. Yet their party is extending itself; and while the leaders, content with the sort of admiration which they excite, comply outwardly with the corruptions and superstitions that they are undermining, the effect on the community at large of this discussion, seems to be paving the way for their final destruction.

301

The unfortunate course which the most celebrated of these leaders, Rammohun Roy of Calcutta, has taken, is perhaps not unknown to the Society. From being an adversary of the Brahmins, his brethren, on their own ancient principles, and endeavoring to restore, on the authority of some part of the Vedas and their commentators, the primeval tradition of the Divine Unity, and to expose the evil of idolatry, of bloody and obscene rites, &c., he has latterly turned to profess himself a Christian; but it is such a Christianity, as, being unaccompanied with any submission of mind to its authority as a supernatural revelation, leaves us no reason to applaud the change. A work published by him some time since, under the very welcome and just title, “The Precepts of Jesus the Guide to Happiness and Peace,” was an artful attempt, in exhibiting all the discourses of Christ which represented practice as the sum and substance of his religion, to set the MoRALITY of the Gospel against its MystEnies; studiously omitting all those discourses which joined the two inseparably together. The work, if divested of its insidious short preface, was perhaps calculated to do good, being composed of passages from the Gospels; but when the Baptists of Serampore directly attacked the pub| lication, he issued forth what he termed, “A | Defence of the Precepts of Jesus,” being an elaborate tract against the doctrine of the Trinity, with that of the Incarnation and Sacrifice of our Savior. This treatise, certainly not entirely his own—and, if report speaks truly, dictated by one who had separated from the Baptists, and has since opened a Unitarian meeting-house at Calcutta—is conspicuous for nothing so much as the presumptuous vanity of its nominal author: its affectation of western learning, and attempts at Greek and Hebrew criticisms, are to the last degree contemptible; and what there is in it to deserve notice, is borrowed from the long confuted supporters of the same impiety in England. Whatever mischief may be apprehended from this publication (which, like his other publications, is not deficient either in | style or plausibility, of manner,) among the malignantly-disposed, who will not inquire further, or among those of Mohammedan Superstition, who with their strong prejudices against the characteristic mystery of Christianity, are yet half convinced by its evidences, there are yet satisfactory appearances that the Antichristian Apostacy, which it supports, will not gain ground among the Christians of this place; and the rock upon which the Church is built will remain here, as in the whole world, unshaken.

ExTRACTS FROM SPEEches.

IN our number for July, pp. 224–230, we brought together, under appropriate heads, a variety of extracts from addresses delivered at recent anniversaries in this country. We now continue our extracts, which will be taken chiefly, but not wholly, from speeches

at the English anniversaries in May last.

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You have heard that in India the inhabitants are divided into a variety of casts. When two Hindoos meet for the participation of food, one diligently inquires of the other, “To what cast do you belong?” He replies, perhaps, ‘I belong to the Catre.'. The inquirer then rejoins, “I am a Brahmin; stand away from me.’ The Catre asks another, To which cast do you belong?” “I am a Vadri.” *Then stand away from me.” The Vadri asks another, ‘To what cast do you belong?' ‘I am a Sudri.” “Then stand away from me.” We have not acted so to-day, for I perceive on this platform, and in this assembly, that we have amongst us Christians, if I may use the term, of all casts. We are met together to participate in a celestial banquet, and I find that at this table there are those who belong to the cast of Baptists, of Independents, and of Churchmen, and I find also that Wesleyans have prepared the feast. This puts me in mind of the field of Juggernaut. There was a Brahmin in Calcutta who asked a European gentleman, “What is your order of Society in Great Britain; are you divided into casts, or do you eat and drink together according to circumstances?” The European gentleman replied, “We deem it our honor to demean ourselves as brethren in the participation of food at one table, as Providence permits.” The Brahmin replied, “That appears to me to be an offence against good morals and good conduct.” The gentleman rejoined, “I think I can prove to you by a practice of your own, that you are in error. How do you act in the field of Juggernaut? Do you not eat there with the lowest cast of India? There you know no distinction of cast, but all feed at one board.” The Brahmin answered, “I can screen myself from the imputation you bring against us, for there we are in the presence of our God; there Juggernaut is in our midst, and there we can feast together.” “Ah,’ said the gentleman, “and I can justify the Christian practice on your own principles, for we are every where in the presence of oun God.” Rev. H. Townley, a JMissionary.

Cruelty of Hindooism.

With regard to this world, having seen a variety of their sufferings, I have often had that passage of Scripture recalled to my at: tention, “Their sorrows shall be multiplied that hasten after another God.” They practise upon themselves a variety of tortures, and abound in the perpetration of mutual deeds of cruelty and bloodshed. Hindoos meet together to have iron hooks thrust into their backs, to be drawn up into the air, and to be swung round with great velocity. You ma see in Calcutta Hindoos dancing about with iron spikes run through their tongues; others with living snakes run through their sides and tongues; and endeavoring to outdo each other in those deeds of iniquity. But they do not stop in these minor acts of cruelty; but go on till they deprive each other even of life itself. Every year, thousands of them find a watery grave; others are buried alive; others are crushed to death by the car of Juggernaut;

Extracts from Sheeches.

SEPT.

and the most numerous class of all are put to death by the flames. It fell to my painful lot to see one woman burned alive; and the deed was committed by her own daughter, with whom II remonstrated as well as with her mother, but to no good effect. The answer the young woman made was, “It is the custom of the country, and what can I do?” But it may well aggravate the poignancy of our sensibility, when we learn that these horrors are customary. Thus it appears by the official returns, that one widow is burned alive every twelve hours; and this, Sir, has reference merely to British India, but does not include a great number of similar victims who escape the observation of the police, or are not ineluded in the returns. I should suppose that the real truth of the case is, that, taking the whole of India into the account, on E is burned every Four houhs. Surely, Sir, it is high time for us to be up, and doing something, te send to them the knowledge of that Gospel which says, “Do thyself no harm.’ ib.

Favorable Prospects in India.

In India God has marvellously opened a door to our exertions, and no man at present has an arm strong enough to shut it. The magistracy of Calcutta surpasses the magistracy of some places in the West. I never met with the slightest opposition in India in the whole course of my ministry. The Governor-General of India, and other Governors, have repeatedly interfered in some parts of our operations; but always in a friendly manner: and since I left India, I have heard with great satisfaction, that the Government have resolved to augment the measure of their liberality with respect to Hindoo schools. It is well known that the Government have given leave to the raissionaries of various Societies to administer instruction to the rising population; and lately, they have resolved to devote one hundred thousand rupees for that work; which sum (about ten thousand pounds sterling) they have given freely, to enlighten British India. I could add many things to confirm the statement of our having access to millions of pagans. I travelled, for about a month, with a converted Brahmin who had iven himself to the promotion of the Gospel. e went to all the cities, and towns, and villages in our way up the river, and took our stations near market-places, and other public situations, and ‘preached the gospel to every creature' who would listen, none daring to make us afraid. We delivered our tracts, which were received with considerable avidity. When we came to one village, we found ourselves in the neighborhood of an idol-temple; and even there, perceiving by the countenance of the people that they were willing to hear us, we took our station, the Brahmias and other Hindoos amounting to fifty or a hundred. One of them said, while I was speaking, ‘Pray, Sir, why do not you ascend the flight of steps leading up to the idol?. There you will have a better station.” I replied, “I could not think of doing it, because, peradventure, some might disapprove.” They replied, “We shall not disapprove.’ I said, ‘You have Brahmins among you, and if one individual disapprove, I will not ascend the stairs.’ “Sir”

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