An Essay on the Origin of Evil, Tom 1

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W. Thurlbourn & J. Woodyer, 1758 - 556
 

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Strona 128 - The whole chasm in nature, from a plant to a man, is filled up with diverse kinds of creatures, rising one over another, by such a gentle and easy ascent, that the little transitions and deviations from one species to another are almost insensible.
Strona 110 - ... to virtue, and knowledge to knowledge; carries in it something wonderfully agreeable to that ambition which is natural to the mind of man.
Strona 141 - Existence is a blessing to those beings only which are endowed with perception ; and is in a manner thrown away upon dead matter, any farther than as it is subservient to beings which are conscious of their existence.
Strona 173 - Labour or exercise ferments the humours, casts them into their proper channels, throws off redundancies, and helps nature in those secret distributions, without which the body cannot subsist in its vigour, nor the soul act with cheerfulness.
Strona lii - the doing good to mankind, in obedience to the will of God, and for the sake of everlasting happiness.
Strona 141 - On the other hand, if we look into the more bulky parts of nature, we see the seas, lakes, and rivers, teeming with numberless kinds of living creatures.
Strona 128 - If the scale of being rises by such a regular progress so high as man, we may, by a parity of reason, suppose that it still proceeds gradually through those beings which are of a superior nature to him ; since there is an infinitely greater space and room for different degrees of perfection between the Supreme Being and man, than between man and the most despicable insect.
Strona 127 - It is wonderful to observe, by what a gradual progress the world of life advances through a prodigious variety of species, before a creature is formed that is complete in all its senses; and even among these there is such a different degree of perfection...
Strona 127 - Infinite goodness is of so communicative a nature, that it seems to delight in the conferring of existence upon every degree of perceptive being. As this is a speculation, which I have often pursued with great pleasure to myself, I shall enlarge farther upon it, by considering that part of the scale of beings which comes within our knowledge.
Strona xxiv - ... whenever this end is not perceived, they are to be accounted for from the association of ideas and may properly enough be called habits.

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