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* thought it will be impossible for Baird ' to get up the Red Sea. With the assist

ance of this force, which is stated at five thousand men, there is no doubt but we • should have forced the French from Egypt; 'without it, I fear, we can do nothing more than we have done. The Turks, though ' numerous, are banditti, and not to be de‘ pended on; to the surprise, however, of

every body, they lately forced back, with ' nine thousand, a body of four thousand

French who marched out of Cairo to attack • them. This is considered as so extraordi

nary, that some French prisoners who are • here, not only will not believe it, but fall a laughing whenever it is mentioned.

• One-half of our army at present occupies 'the camp before Alexandria, which has been ' strengthened considerably since the action • of the 21st. The other half, with a body of • Turks, is upon the Nile, within thirty or forty miles of Cairo. General Hutchinson had advanced that far, with a view of sup'porting the Vizir, who is upon the Damietta

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! branch of the Nile, and to facilitate the * junction of General Baird ; but on finding

1 that the latter had not reached Suez, he · halted. I expect to hear from him daily. "As yet I know not his further determina* tion. But as I said before, I fear, with his

present force, he can do little. Our num'bers, and those of the French, are too equal,

and with equal numbers it is impossible to • force fortified posts. It will be found that, when we landed, the French had not less * than eighteen thousand soldiers. They are

very stout men. We have taken above two * thousand of them. They are tired of the

country, and wish to be back to France. • No wonder! but they all allow the country to be fertile, and that it affords, on the ' cheapest terms, every necessary. They seem to want for nothing, and have all a good deal of money.

· The revenues were collected by an armed • force, and every act of violence used. When

they had extorted what was due to govern* ment, I suppose they insisted upon some

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thing for themselves. As we treat the in· habitants well, and pay them, we shall soon 'gain their affection ; but our allies the Turks . pillage, murder, and destroy, and are worse • than the French. It is heart-breaking to • think that, if we are successful, we are • to hand over the poor inhabitants to such • banditti.

• The Turkish government has subsisted · too long • Love to my Mother, and to all. Ever, my dear Father, Affectionately yours,

• John Moore.

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To his Mother:

• Camp before Alexandria, Sept. 2, 1801. • My dear Mother,-Our grenadiers took possession this day of the principal works ' of Alexandria; the garrison have capitulated, • and are to embark in ten days for France. • Egypt will then be completely evacuated by • the French ; the country in our possession ; . and the object of the campaign accom

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plished. It is said that the garrison wanted ' provisions, which is the cause of their sur* rendering upon being invested, and before ' any impression was made upon their works. . • I believe to this may be added the dislike

of the French soldiery to have any more * conflicts with this army; for, from the beginning, in one trifling instance only ex* cepted, they have uniformly been beaten in every rencontre.

• As your anxiety will now be turned to our · future destination, it will give you pleasure • to know that I do not remain in Egypt; • this duty falls on General Baird, and the 'troops from India, who have just joined us.

We all embark for Malta, as soon as shipping is prepared, when the Commandant-in• chief expects further orders. I cannot de• vise what further service there can be for * this army in the Mediterranean, and I shall ' not be surprised if, upon our arrival at • Malta, the orders should be to return home, • after leaving sufficient garrisons at Malta and Minorca. This arrangement will not

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• be disapproved of by you, and I own I shall ' not be sorry for it. Some of our Generals • have got leave to go to England; my • health is good, I shall therefore take the • fate of the troops.

'I find, by a late letter from my father, • that Charles is at last made a Commissioner . of Bankrupts; I rejoice at this first instance • of good fortune, which, I trust, will speedily • lead to others more important. I flatter ' myself that Charles requires only to be · known to be employed.

. Colonel Abercrombie carries home the · public despatches ; I shall give him this, ' and a couple of shawls for you and Jane; they were given to me lately by the Captain • Pacha. I do not know that they are of any

value, but they will keep you warm, and ' you will wear them for the sake of the donor.

. Since the complaint I made in April I • have received a great many letters, both • from you and others of the family, and now • know that it was not your fault if I did not hear from you sooner. You will know

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VOL. II.

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