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! chances may happen ; but by their conduct they have rendered our prospects very · doubtful.

• Farewell; you will grieve for the death of poor Sir Ralph; it has affected the whole army. My love to my Mother, Jane, &c., &c. · Tell James that Mr. Morrell delivered me · his letters within these few days only. • Believe me, my dear Father,

• Most affectionately,

John Moore.'

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Sir Robert Brownrigg to Dr. Moore.

• Horse Guards, London : Friday, 15th May, 1801. My dear Sir,-Dispatches have been re'ceived from the army in Egypt, giving an "account of the action of the 21st March. · And I hasten to inform you from authority, ' that my friend General Moore's wound is ‘not dangerous. The officer of the navy • who brought the dispatches, says that he . was able to return to his duty before he left Egypt (the 6th of April). The action of the 21st March appears to have been one of the

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• best fought, and most serious of the war;

' our victory was decisive, with the melancholy and afflicting allay, however, of the “ loss of that most inestimable and distin

guished officer, Sir Ralph Abercrombie. . • He there received a mortal wound, of which "he died on the 28th of the same month. He I was wounded early in the action, but never mentioned it, and it was only made known ' by his falling from his horse from the loss of blood, after the battle was over. • God bless you, my dear Sir; let me see you whenever

you come to town. The dispatches received, give encouragement to hope for ultimate success. The whole • French force was engaged on the 21st, and · which (one or two detachments excepted) is now at Alexandria.

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• Yours ever,

• ROBERT BROWNRIGG. • Mrs. B. and her child are doing well.'

• Rosetta, 26th May, 1801. • My dear Father,-Letters from my Mo

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ther and Jane of the 28th and 29th January, · which I received three weeks ago, contain • the latest account of the family. I have the • satisfaction of knowing that then you were • all well. My Mother says, that you, in particular, are much the better for the summer you have passed in the country. She says · Graham was well on the 11th November, • but he had not been very successful. When 'I was wounded, I went on board ship, be

cause, at that time, we had possession of • the sandy peninsula of Aboukir only, and • there was no option but the ship, or the

ground, under a soldier's tent. As soon as . we were in possession of this place, and it

was considered as sufficiently secure, my 'wishes coincided with the medical advice; I • landed, and have been here with Anderson · about a fortnight. My leg is at last nearly

well; another sinus and collection made ' an opening necessary soon after I came on

shore, but it will be the last. The original · wounds made by the ball are closed. My - leg is now resuming its natural colour, and

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• is firm and sound. The opening made last ' by the surgeon is not quite, but will be • closed, he says,

in three or four days. I • then have to get the better of weakness and ' of about an inch-and-half's contraction. • The heel, when standing, does not meet the ground by that much, but this, the surgeon says, will soon be accomplished by gentle • exercise. My health is perfectly good, and • I hope in a fortnight to join the army. Ana

. • derson's wound is also nearly closed, but he ' will be some time, probably months, before • he has the perfect use of his hand.

• This last wound has been much more trou• blesome and painful than what I got in Hol• land; but when I consider the action, and look • round me to see what others have suffered, · I have to thank God it was no worse. Poor · Vigoureux was wounded in the action of the ' 13th in the knee; his leg ought at first to • have been amputated, it is now, I fear, too • • late. There is very little hope of his reco

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Sir Ralph.

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progress since the death of

poor · The French are now confined to Alexandria • and Cairo. The whole of the Delta is in • our possession. I thought they would have • stood at Rhamanie. To them it was a most

important port. It secured the communica• tion of Alexandria with the country and ' with Cairo, and by covering the course of • the Nile enabled them at all times to throw * supplies into Alexandria. By retiring be'fore us from Rhamanie, they show that they

are determined never to stand another • action with us in the field. They will fight * us behind the works of those places, which

are strong and well provisioned, and take • the chance of the havoc which sickness may 'make amongst us in the hot months.• Hitherto we are healthy.

• Admiral Blanket has been at Suez some ! time, and it was understood that a land force * from India, under General Baird, had · reached Suez likewise. This unfortunately • proves not to be the case, and as the northwest winds have set in, in that quarter, it is

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