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• till our wounds are healed. Anderson has • lost a brother, a lieutenant in the 42nd ; he was killed on the 21st.

• It is difficult to say as yet what the issue of all this will be. Government has un* doubtedly been deceived with respect to the · force and situation of the French in Egypt; • the Delta is a most plentiful country, their

army wants for nothing, and in the last " action their numbers exceeded ours. Un

less, therefore, ministers, apprized in time of their error, send reinforcements, or the • Turks act with energy, what chance have

we, with inferior numbers, to dispossess the • French of their strong holds ?

*I have bad the satisfaction of seeing the superiority of the British infantry over the • .

French In three successive actions we · have beat them without cavalry, and inferior . in artillery. This is the Army of Italy! but • the prisoners say the fighting there was

nothing to this. I am convinced that nothing ' ever surpassed the determined valour of our men ; and what I have witnessed here will

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. be a subject of pride and satisfaction to me while I live.

• This goes by Constantinople; the oppor'tunity was told me privately as a favour, ' and I have availed myself of it in haste. My love to my Mother, &c.; François • dresses my wound, and makes a poultice as · if he had practised at St. George's Hospital. I shall recommend him to James when the war is over.

• If you meet W. Paget, you may assure him that his brother's wound is not serious. • He expects to be with the reserve in a ' few days, and to command it till Oakes .and I can join. The inclosed is to an uncle

of Anderson. He desires his remembrance ' to you, &c. Believe me, my dear Father,

- Your affectionate

J. Moore.'

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· H. M. S. Diadem, Aboukir Bay,

Egypt, 1st April, 1801. My dear Father,—We have lost Sir · Ralph ; he died upon the 28th of the wound • he received on the 21st. The ball has been

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• found since his death, sticking in the thigh bone; near the socket of the hip. I had

I an opportunity of writing to you the day · after the action by way of Constantinople; 'I had no idea then that his wound was dangerous ; but the medical people very soon despaired. He was seldom free from • fever, had frequent fits of delirium, and a

gangrene had actually commenced when he : expired.

• Sir Ralph has fallen at a moment most • unfortunate for his country; we stand in ' need of his experience, his sagacity, and 'judgment to extricate us; but he could have ' fallen at no period more fortunately for his ! own fame. It has happened to no other

general during this war to beat the French in three successive actions. He will be • honoured and lamented by his country, and • his name handed down to posterity with the * most distinguished of his countrymen. This

is the consolation I derive from the loss of * the best man, and best soldier, who has • appeared amongst us this war.

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General Hutchinson succeeds him, who is an accomplished man, and a man of sense. • He succeeds to a command, the brilliant part of which, I fear, is over; indeed, with our numbers, I do not see how he can go farther. Inferior as we are in force, and in resources 'to the enemy, how is it possible we can force a strong position, and then carry on the siege of Alexandria ?

• Sir Ralph saw his situation in the most . unpromising light; and had, I know, no hope of final success, but from events which were not in his power to command.

• It is owing to the uncommon gallantry ' and good conduct of our troops, that we are * thus far, and have been able to surmount • the difficulties which have occurred. A • check would have been fatal. The expe! dition was planned upon very wrong infor.mation of the situation of the French in this country, and in the expectation of a

co-operation of the Turks; which, from the ' miserable state of that power, it is unable to 'give.

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• I have been on board here since the 21st, with General Oakes and Anderson. Some 'cloth carried into my wound, caused inflam'mation, and has for some days made me • uncomfortable ; it is now something better, • but I do not expect to be fit for duty these

three weeks. Anderson's wound gives him * pain; but with time and patience we shall (both do.

. You have all been extremely silent since • I left you; I have not had a line from one ' of the family since I sailed from Gibraltar. · I am glad to have had an opportunity of • meeting the French in the field equal• handed, to convince them that we in red are as stout fellows as our brothers in blue

e ; but that satisfaction over, I do not see what • benefit we are to derive from this contention prolonged. As it seems an object, for the security of India, that the French should • be driven from Egypt, our good ministers · had better have sent us reinforcements in

time; we should then have done it for them. • We have still to hope that favourable

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