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agree with me. We are here surrounded ' with the Shannon, which at this season

overflows; and we live in perpetual damps. · My constitution seems to yield more to * damp than to anything else. . I remember I

was ill formerly at Kinsale. I am far from 'well this fortnight past, no appetite, yellow, '&c. I am averse to try Trim's recipe, ' burned whiskey, or radical heat against the • radical moisture of the foggy Shannon.

• I am truly happy that James is about to marry (a state which becomes all men who 'can settle), and that his dear partner is one of whom

you all so much approve. ... As for ' me, I I suppose I shall be the old bachelor.

They must give me a place amongst them ' and put up with my humours; and they • shall have, even whilst I live, the good ' things these wars may bestow on me.

• I wrote to Lord Huntley about James. • Many returns of the season to all in Clif• ford Street.

• Ever, my dear Father,
• Your affectionate Son,

• John Moore.

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• Athlone, April 9th, 1799. • My dear Mother,—I received yesterday your

letter from Petersham, of the 2d. The country seems to agree so well with you and Jane, that I should be glad you would enjoy it every summer. I have just been - telling Frank, to whom I have been writ

ing, that it has for some time been a castle ' of mine, when the war is over,-my regi'ment stands, or that I get another, to take

a bachelor's lodge somewhere in Surrey, large enough for you and Jane constantly,

and two or three interlopers occasionally. · With your assistance, and François, (who,

( • by the bye, is a treasure,) I should keep * the house in summer, and should return, • and pass the winter with you in Clifford • Street. Tell me your objection to this plan; • do not, by reducing my regiment, upset the pail, and destroy the castle.

'I received two letters from Graham, whilst he was at Cork ; . . he is • in great spirits. I expect his return full • handed, about the beginning of May.

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• We are prepared to receive the French. · I am, and have been, very busy. They will

certainly come here, if the Archduke does ' not give them employment elsewhere, and • the chance of their invading us keeps me ' from complaining; otherwise this is a vil• lanous hole, and I am sick of it. I wish ' that something turned up, to take me out of it this spring, or summer. If I cannot get employed elsewhere, I must get a couple of · months relaxation in England-I bespeak a ' room in your bandbox. Of late years I · have been used to small

space ;

six feet square will do.

• Anderson begs his remembrance to you. • He is not robust; but as he takes care of

himself, he holds out pretty well ; and will, • I hope, stand the campaign, if we have one.

My hours are as good as yours; I am up · between five and six every morning. I am

employed all the morning ; we, as yet, dine • late, at six o'clock; and I pass nine evenings in ten by myself, at home. Military

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VOL. II.

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' men are not thought to lead such a life. Love to all, and believe me, • My dear Mother, affectionately, &c.

John Moore.'

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To Mrs. Moore, dictated by the General, and written by Aide-de-camp Anderson :

• Barsingenhorn, Holland, 18th Sept., 1799. My dear Mother,-My first station was upon the left of the army, it was then changed to the right, where I got my finger • broke. I am now upon the left again, but some miles in front. I have my arm in a sling, and am obliged to use Anderson's hand, to his great annoyance, when I ad• dress

you and others; these are the only 'inconveniences I suffer: I never was in bet* ter health, and seldom (which is saying a great deal) underwent more daily fatigue.

« The arrival of the Duke of York with the reinforcements, foreign and domestic, puts • an end to our defensive operations, and we · begin to think of attacking in our turn. * The grand push will probably be made in a

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• day or two, and if successful, which is . hardly to be doubted, we shall not meet with much more resistance till we reach Amsterdam.

* All this will keep you upon the tenter· hooks, and I cannot help you; for I must do

my duty, that I may again meet you with all the satisfaction which such interviews · have hitherto constantly afforded me.

• I saw His Royal Highness (the Duke of • York) the day of his arrival, and notwith'standing a four days' beard, which gave

him * the look of a savage, he received me most ' kindly. I have been given to understand " that I am to have the command of some· thing more distinguished than my present • brigade, but I am not to lose the High

landers (this entre nous); whatever is given * to me, shall be unsolicited, as it is only in • that way that it can be gratifying to me. • I have not had a line from any mortal since • I left England, not even by Brownrigg ; and ' yet I do not blame you, for I am persuaded it is none of

your faults.

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