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Conway, an ancient town, and the Gothic

castle built on “ Old Conway's foaming · flood,” is the most romantic place I ever saw ; • it was well-suited for an old Welsh baron. • We crossed the river Conway near the sea, and then the road leads close to Penman• muir. Nothing is more savage, I am persuaded, in the Alps; and situated, as it is,

; upon the sea-coast, in that respect the view • is superior.

· We got to Holyhead at six o'clock yesterday evening. I did not feel much fatigued; but I washed myself in warm water, • and went immediately to bed. I was awa• kened before twelve o'clock at night to em

bark, and shall be at Dublin before twelve • o'clock to-day.

* It will be my business to set off in the 'mail-coach this evening for Athlone, to see 'my dear brother : but I imagine, I had al‘most said I fear, everything will be over • before I can reach the army, the news at Holyhead is so favourable,

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• Dublin, six o'clock in the Evening.

· The account here is that General Lake • has been surprised. His outposts guarded * carefully the high-roads, but the French · chose to march by the narrow paths ; a complete surprise and rout was the consequence; six pieces of cannon were taken, • the number of the killed is concealed. • Lord Cornwallis, it is thought, has so great ' a force, that the French will lay down their • arms without firing. O! that I may arrive

in time! I have luckily got a place in a carriage to-night for Athlone; and perhaps " I shall still see the French in battalia. • This in haste. Yours affectionately,

James Moore.'

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Moate, Ireland, 16th Sept., 1798. My dear Father, -James, disappointed in 'not seeing a battle, left me at Carrick Shan* non. That day I received a note to attend Lord Cornwallis, at Lord Longford's. His • first intention was to have sent me to Kilala,

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• and Castlebar,-in short, to the country • lately disturbed, in order to disarm and quiet .it; but having information of other armaments ready, in Brest, to sail for this country, he determined to send another officer, and to keep my corps in a central situation, • ready to move to any point threatened. After giving the troops a couple of days rest, I • marched to this place, and have pitched my • camp in a convenient situation, a mile from • the village; for myself I have taken lodg‘ings; as no enemy exists, I think it fair to indulge; especially as since I left Cork, the beginning of June, till now, some few days • in Dublin excepted, I have never slept with my clothes off.

• I believe it is intended, if the French do not again derange our plans, that I • should cantoon in this neighbourhood during " the winter. Great numbers of English • militia are pouring over.

It is found that • the Irish are not to be depended upon, not • from disaffection, but from want of disci

Sir Ralph's assertion

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• has been completely verified ; they are for• midable to everything but the enemy. * James must have given you every detail, · which makes it unnecessary for me to enter • upon

them. Had the campaign continued, my post at the head of the reserve was most • enviable. I, however, wish for no more visits from the French; the consequences ' are too serious for this country and for • Great Britain.

My love to my Mother, &c. &c. Ever, 'my dear Father,

• Your affectionate Son,

• John Moore.'

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Athlone, Dec. 9, 1798. • My dear Father,- I received your letter • of the 3rd yesterday. My reason for communicating to Anderson, what I did not ' wish him to mention even in Clifford Street, ' was to delay his journey till such time as it was determined whether I was to leave this country or not. I was enjoined secrecy ; • besides which, I was unwilling to tantalize

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you or my Mother with the hopes of seeing me, which might not be realized.

· By a letter I received from B' yesterday, I consider my recall as cer: • tain. Lord Cornwallis will, I believe, not • be pleased to part with me, but a pe‘remptory order in the King's name will not • leave him an option. The high opinion I : have of Lord Cornwallis's character, the

distinguished command I bear, and the · favour he shows me on every occasion, ren• der my situation in this country (if there

was war) more pleasant, and more brilliant, " than it can possibly be elsewhere ; but I ' consider the service in Ireland as over. · The French lost the moment, and can no * longer invade but with a superior force. I . am, therefore, well pleased to be taken from

a country, where nothing but war could re· concile me to stay,—to be employed in a ' scene likely to be more active.

• At present I can say no more to you, and · I must recommend, even to this much, the

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* Sir Robert Brownrigg, Secretary to the Duke of York,

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