Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

6

6

6

6

* this had better not be spoken of in the first • instance by any of the family.

Brownrigg will forward your letters; I · have begged of him to enclose them to the

Adjutant-General, who is my old friend, ' and who will always know where I am to be • found.

• It is my intention to write to General Stuart; but, should I be prevented, remem* ber me most kindly to him.

• I have seen nothing more of Graham; but • he is still cruising off the coast.

My promotion (to the rank of majorgeneral) is in orders. Anderson becomes * captain and aid-de-camp, no longer nominal • major. I believe Lord Huntly is to be under me as a brigadier. • Love to my father, Jane, &c. &c.

• Your affectionate Son,

John Moore.'

[ocr errors]

6

6

6

• Dublin, 18th July, 1798. • My dear Father, I received your let• ter of the 10th soon after I wrote to you

[ocr errors]

ܪ

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

from Taghmon. I left that place to join General Lake at Carnew ; under whose direction I was to act in driving the rebels from • the counties of Wexford and Wicklow. On every movement since that I have led a separate column. The rebels waited for us nowhere. We found the country deserted; villages and houses burned ; nothing could be more melancholy. Though we have had no fighting, the fatigue and inconvenience of • the troops has been very great.

• In the mountains of Wicklow we were obliged to divest ourselves of all baggage ; • and, for a week, notwithstanding hard rain ' and cold, lay on the ground without tents or

covering. The major-general might occa‘sionally have covered himself, but he chose to share the fate of his men. You cannot ' follow our wanderings ;-the places are not ' marked in any map you can have. At last, ' on the 15th, we all met at Blessington, fourteen miles from this. General Lake re* turned to Dublin. A corps is formed for me

6

[ocr errors]

VOL. II.

z

there, consisting of two battalions of light infantry, three regiments of the line, in

cluding the 100th and Lord Huntley's High• landers, who is himself a brigadier under

6

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

• This is to be a moving corps. It amounts 6 to three thousand men. A few days are given to us to rest and provide clothes.

"I was desired in the meantime to come here, where Lord Cornwallis received me in a • flattering manner, spoke confidentially, &c.

• I have great confidence in his moderation ' and good sense to settle this distracted country, His soldier-like, plain, manly manners, free from all pomp or ostentation, : impress me with high esteem and respect • for him.

'I shall return to Blessington to-morrow. "My command is completely separate ;—to • be controlled by none of the older generals ; ' to act at discretion, or by orders from Lord • Cornwallis or General Lake. Nothing can • be more flattering or distinguished. I hope

6

[ocr errors]

6

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

6

• I shall be able to act up to the trust reposed • in me. That pains shall not be spared I • think you

will not doubt. • I have neither seen nor heard of Graham, since the half hour at Wexford.

• I shall lose an old and valuable friend in poor Nesbitt. I cannot tell you how I

how I regret • him. His worth and good sense are not to • be replaced. All comfort and happiness are . at an end for Mrs. Nesbitt.

• I have done with the south, and have de' spatched François for my baggage, which I • left at Bandon. My residence for some time ' will probably be nearer to Dublin. To'morrow I return to Blessington.

• Sir Ralph has written me a kind letter ; • but I have heard nothing yet from General

Stuart, though I wrote to him the moment I • heard he was in England. Remember me • kindly to him and Mrs. Stuart. · My love to my Mother, &c.

Your affectionate Son,

& John Moore.'

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

James Moore to Dr. Moore, in passing over to Ireland to join his brother :

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

• Elizabeth packet, Mid-Channel,

• Friday Noon, Aug. 3, 1798. · My dear Father,--My journey to Holy• head was delightful. At first we passed

through the rich middle counties of England, "-fertile and flat; the harvest all taken in, * so that there is unquestionably no want of food through the land, for those who have money to purchase it. Yesterday, before • sun-rise, we entered North Wales. I never * remember being so delighted with scenery; . lofty mountains, sometimes ornamented with

wood, oftener rocky and rugged, too steep · even for sheep, and too bare to give them • much sustenance. While travelling along • the sun seemed to rise twice, owing to the

unequal heights of the hills. The morning ' was unclouded, and the mountains were

clear, while the plains were immersed in • dew, which gradually dissolved, as the sun • warmed, and brought to view villages, trees, . and the diversified appearance of the ground.

6

6

6

6

« PoprzedniaDalej »