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· have given them balls, and endeavoured to enliven them, but it is impossible. They are an unamiable set, and I have never been so happy amongst them since we left the "field. Indeed, since that time, I have wished 'the regiment to be moved elsewhere.

• It was my intention to have written to • Jane by this courier, but I feel as if I • should defer it to another opportunity, as ( well as to Charles. · Believe me, my dear Mother, • Your affectionate Son,

John Moore.

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· I inclose a commission, which I hope you ' will not scruple to execute for a poor boy 'who has fallen to my charge. His father ' was a very good soldier, and the son promises to be no less so.-Farewell.'

To James Moore:

* Bastia, 10th August, 1795. My dear James, I received your letter • of the 29th June. Your conjecture is right « that the first attacks of the fever do not

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season people to the climate,-on the contrary, the longer they remain, the less they are able to resist, and are more subject to attacks again. I have, however, had the * good fortune to continue well. I do not find 'the sun has the same effect upon me which • I hear others complain of; and I do not · feel the smallest tendency to a relapse. My « face is the worse of the wear; I look, I sup

pose, at least ten years older than you or · Graham.

• I have written to the Duke of Hamilton, . and I make no doubt but, in case of a dis. 'solution, he will bring me into Parliament, if

But there's the rub. He neglects ‘his interests so much, his power must always

be uncertain. His being with Govern'ment, the Dukes of Buccleugh and Queens

bury being so also, will prevent, perhaps, • his being opposed (on this occasion). If my presence is at all necessary, I have told him I can get leave for a short time.

I am happy at Graham's success, but he must make two or three thousands more to

he can.

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• make him comfortable at a peace.

I

agree * with you that I have nothing to regret in not

being employed in the West Indies. By“the-bye, neither my mother nor you have

• taken any notice of the letters I wrote to

you the 23rd May, in answer to yours on • the marriage.

• James Crawfurd left this a fortnight ago, upon his promotion. He is a spirited, ho' nourable lad, a little hot-headed at times. • Much will depend on his getting under a · sensible and gentlemanly Lieut.-Colonel. * You may be very sure that I was as kind • and attentive to him as possible. I should · have been very ungrateful had I been other• wise to a connexion of John Crawfurd, ' to whom I beg you will remember me in the • kindest manner. I should write to him 'occasionally, but I know he hates being • bored.

* Apply to my mother to buy some white ' cotton thread, such as is used for em• broidering, and send it to me by a messenger. Send a good quantity of it, it is

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• for a fair Corsican. Send me, at the same

time, a shaving brush ; such things are not ' to be had out of England. Do not let either 'politics or philosophy make you forget • these. Not being actively employed I am ' tired of being so long absent from those I • love. I hope we shall soon meet once more. • Remember me to my father, mother, &c. &c. • and believe me, my dear James, • Your affectionate Brother,

John Moore,'

Brigadier-General Moore, when ordered to the West Indies :

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• Portsmouth, Feb, 25th, 1796. • My dear Mother,– I received this morning your letter as I was setting out for this place. I unexpectedly got the order to come here and embark with the foreign corps, expected to sail immediately. As 'I have nothing but my portmanteau and

seven shirts, you may conceive how in• convenient this sudden order is to me. I • shall

go, however, in much better case than ‘ the troops under my command, who are in

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“a state not to be described ; people seem determined to do everything as ill as possible. I shall be able, in the course of tomorrow, to see a little clearer, and shall again write to my father or you. In the 'meantime direct any letters for me to this * place. I have desired my trunk to be for' warded from Southampton; but it is more ' than probable I shall sail before it arrives. • God bless you, my dear Mother.

, iny
· Believe me your affectionate son,

John Moore,'

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• On board the John and James Transport,

three o'clock, Feb. 28th, 1796.

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· My dear Mother,-I got into a boat with my light baggage this morning at seven o'clock, and after beating about for some • hours, I at last found this ship ; she is a very good one, a West India trader, coppered. The captain and agent of transports • received me very kindly, and allow me to * partake of their mess, which I preferred to • that of some artillery officers, with whom I * was unacquainted. We shall do very well,

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