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if, however, there is a war, he must be in•cluded soon, and the disappointment he lately met with will, I hope, strengthen his claims. Remember me very kindly to him • when you write.

. • I forgive my father for not writing; he is . better employed; but these times are so • interesting, I hope, from some one of the family, I

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hear a little oftener. If philosophic James could give himself the · trouble, he is a most satisfactory corre

spondent. Make allowances, my dear • Mother, for the difference of situations. • Yours at the fountain head---mine where * one day is exactly the counterpart of the other.

There is nothing here for the memory to rest upon; and it is remarked, ' that time appears to pass very quickly at « Gibraltar,

· Remember me to my father, &c., and be' lieve me, my dear Mother, yours most affectionately,

.JM.'

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Gibraltar, 22nd June, 1793. My dear Mother, I received your letter ' and James's, of the 30th March, a few days

ago, by a young lad who came here recom' mended to me by Peter Murdoch. I have • heard so seldom from home of late, that I suppose you do not know that, since the communication through France was stopped, * the mails come to us by Lisbon, though

arrangements are not yet made to take our • letters from hence. We do, however, con' trive occasionally to get them sent.

'I had hopes of an expedition against Toulon, with troops from England, from this gar* rison, and joined, if necessary, by Austrians ‘and Sardinians; but Lord Hood is arrived • without a soldier. As I had the forming of the • expedition myself, you may believe I gave myself a tolerable command in it; but now my castle is destroyed, and I am at times as melancholy as a cat, at the thoughts of remaining here unemployed the whole war.

* But who would have imagined such a fleet would have been sent to the Mediterranean,

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• merely to convoy the trade up

and down; for nobody doubts that the French will stay in “their harbours as long as our fleet continues • in this neighbourhood. Therefore, in my

opinion, to burn the shipping and destroy • the arsenal of Toulon would have been a ' great coup; a little impracticable, perhaps,

or so, but that does not signify; the attempt 'would have been great, and would have ' kept some of my friends and me from fretting, as we shall do, the whole summer. * Had our Major come out, I believe I should • have endeavoured to get home, to try if upon the spot I could not negociate an ' exchange. Lord Hood and the fleet, twenty ' sail of the line, are to sail in a day or two.

They begin, it is said, by cruizing off Tou• lon. I have met with several of Graham's friends, who have seen him lately. I fear his situation is not more flattering than my own. They tell me he has taken no prizes, · and they do not seem to think he has much · chance of immediate promotion. I hope, • however, to hear from you, that in this they

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' are mistaken. How pleasant it would have been to us both had he come out with Lord

• Hood !

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• I long to see my father's book; I ex'pected it by the fleet.

* Sir James Murray's letter is much criti'cised by General O'Hara, and some others · here: it strikes me as a plain narrative, and • tolerably distinct.

• I thank Jane for her letter: as long as her • travels are confined to England, I can con

ceive her liking them; but I can assure her, * that one day's journey through the country of Don Quixote would prevent her from having the least desire to undertake a second.

· I am quite happy to hear such good • accounts of Charles, remember me to him • and James. If the Duke or Duchess of · Hamilton are in town, you may tell them ' that young Bennet, who was wounded in the • action with the French frigate, continues to recover fast. · When my father gets his book off his

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hands, he will, I hope, write to me. Be• lieve me, my dear Mother,

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• Yours most affectionately,

John Moore.

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Gibraltar, 30th Sept., 1793.

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• My dear Father, - It is impossible to be more obliged to you than I am for your . endeavour to get me actively employed; I · hope you will succeed. I wait, with the * utmost impatience, to hear from you after ‘ your interview with Sir Charles Grey.

To 'go with the regiment upon service is the

object next my heart. I have got the ma·chine into as good order as I can, and I wish • to have it used. When the intelligence of • the business at Toulon first reached this, • General O'Hara endeavoured to persuade • the Governor to send a strong detachment • under him to Toulon, and he proposed the • 51st as one of the regiments ; but the old

gentleman was timid, and said he would not ' take such a step without orders. It would • have been fortunate if he had, as Lord Hood

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