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lop, that Frank has gone to France with · Basil Browne; I am glad to hear this. • Farewell, love to my Mother, and to them all, and to the Duke. · Believe me, dear Father, - Your most affectionate Son,

John Moore.'

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Captain-Lieutenant Moore to Dr. Moore:

Camp, near Halifax, Nova Scotia,

* June 19th, 1780. * Dear Father,-Yesterday evening two * frigates came express from New York, with despatches for the General, they return • again to-morrow; we have so seldom op' portunities from this place, that I could not • think of allowing this one to escape me.

I • have been sitting upon a general court· martial this week past, but luckily we were * adjourned early this forenoon, otherwise I

might not have had time. This is a duty • we are troubled with very often, as the • officers of the Provincial corps are continu• ally quarrelling among one another, and misbehaving

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• The last opportunity I had of writing to you ' was by Lieutenant MʻQuarie of the 74th. • Since that we have encamped, and are preparing to receive the French, who are expected soon. I suppose this express has · been sent to put us on our guard ; if that

was the case, they might have saved them'selves the trouble, as General M Lean has · been doing everything in his power, to for* tify the Citadel Hill, which is our strong

hold, when we are beaten from our encamp'ments and outposts : and I am in great · hopes, though our garrison is but small, only about one thousand five hundred

men, ' militia, &c., included, that we shall be able ' to make a very good defence; I will answer • for it General M-Lean will not give up * easily.

· The hopes of being attacked is the only thing that renders this garrison supportable, we are all heartily tired of it, and would

give the world to be sent to New York ; if • I had had time to have settled my affairs * before this frigate sailed, I would have

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• asked leave to join the General's company
' at head-quarters, where I should have had
• a much greater chance of seeing service, and
• likewise of getting an exchange into an old
• regiment. As to the paymastership, the
profits are not equal to the risk of being re-
• duced at the peace, besides, if I am left to
'myself to judge, I would never allow any
lucrative affair to come into the scale with
military preferment: if I am once reduced,
• God knows when I may get in again, at all
• events it would be as youngest.

· Ever since I heard of Rodney's engagement with the French fleet in the West Indies, I have been wishing Graham may have not left the Trident, it will be such a disappointment to him, poor fellow !

'I have taken it into my head since I • heard Frank was sent to France, that he · will choose the army for his profession ; if • he does, the sooner he gets in the better, as • it will be of great use to him to serve a little before the war is over; it is out of my power to give an opinion impartially, whe

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*ther it would be proper for him or not, as I • have been so very fortunate myself, that I

undoubtedly prefer the army to any profes•sion on earth, but the chances are so great ' that he would not be so successful, and it is ' terrible to be long a subaltern; as it is im

possible for a man to be perfectly happy, ' when he is pinched for money. If I thought · he was sure of a company in four or five ' years, I would wish he was in the army, not otherwise. At all events, if he is re• solved to enter the army, get him taught • drawing and fortification ; history, &c., he . can read by himself afterwards. I cannot · help being amazed at myself, how much I ' am taking upon me; giving myself the airs ' of advising you, who know so much better, ' what is necessary to teach Frank if he is • intended for the

army,

but
you

must excuse 'me, my dear Father.

· As roast-beef is just beat, I must leave ' you for some minutes.

· Five o'clock.—I am just come from din' ner; the Major told us he had letters from

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I assure you,

* New York; none of our officers are ex

changed yet, except Captain Pitcairn, but • they will be soon, as we have taken as

many prisoners at Charleston, as will re• lease not only Burgoyne's army, but every

prisoner they have of ours : by the bye, all • the

guns of the garrison were fired this forenoon, upon account of the news from · Charleston, which came yesterday.

'I wonder you have not got acquainted ' with Major Craig's father in London; I am very much obliged to the

son; · he has been kinder to me than any man I ' ever met with.

• Your friend Dunlop is well, he is very much 'improved in every respect since I knew him ' first : he is a very excellent lad, and cleverer * than most you meet with in the army, and ' improves much upon acquaintance.

My love to my Mother, Sister, and Brothers. If the French come here, you may expect an interesting letter.

· Believe me, dear Father,
- Your most affectionate Son,

• John Moore.'

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