Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub
[graphic]

Associate Reform

At the late meetinSynod of the 1:, Church, the Rev. 1) that in consequence. determined to resi vost in Columbia ( tending to take a he should be pret ing any longer a ological Semini pressed their do

of the services .tuitously rende voted him 50 their disposi'' more liberal

The num' ded at the last term w the institu. 30th of A Expence. Ditto of Student Contin

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

ca Christian Magazine. literal Jerusalem. It is to be re-i "the Jens to their own landed in her own place, even in Jeru nium ; being a brief an- I would here ask every reader, w difficulties suggested in a it be not evident, that the Holy iz by the late Dr. Edwards, || designed to guard us in this p shed in the U. C. May. Vol. against a typical interpretation of

salem. 3. This passage must loo e remarked, that the return ward to a re-peopling of Jerusale to their own land in the Mil-| the Jens. The city was inhabited ot in itself a contradiction. Zechariah prophesied; and it has 'ifficult it may appear, it is not inhabited ever since. But the y.

its own proper inhabitants, hare is an event which it is possible since been driven from it. The e ne place, then it must be pos- now considered as stripped of its i God to foretel it. There isitants, and is trodden down by the urative language in the Bible, | tiles. But when the Jews shall be is not made it impossible for tored to their own land, then Je: (1= peak.plainly, and without a fig-will, in the language of scripture, u he Bible is full of typical lan- habited again. That the fen's ?re but this has not made it impos people who are to repossess dins 'r God to speak in literal language. | is evident from the context.

is a spiritual Jerusalem, it is cexion with the passage which we d: but it will not be denied that considering is that emisest predicti is also a literal Jerusalem. There Go:l's pouriog out his spirit on the J teaveply Canaan; but there is also which will lead them to look (2 naan on earth. Now then, it can. whom they pierced, and mourn. ne denied but that it is possible for as this undoubtedly leiers to their

to speak of the Canaan which lies version to christianity iv tie Misipan the Mediterranean sea, and of the it is natural to suppose, that their :

Jerusalem; and so speak, as to make inhabiting Jerusalem, is then to vident that this is the Canaan, and place. • Jerusalem which he intends. As this Perhaps it may be thought by so ill not be disputed, we are prepared, that the inhabiling of Jerusalera ao

3. To examine some passages of scrip- which is spoken of in this passage, une ure which seem to relate to this subject. no more than to predict a great incre et us first examine Zech. xii. 6. “Andil of its inhabitants by others soon retr lerusalem shall be inhabited again, in ing from Babylou, and also by nata her own place, even in Jerusalem. On population. To ibis it may be repli this

passage we note, 1. It is a prediction that by comparing Hag. i. 1, with Ze of what was then future; and it was de-|i. 1, it appears, that these two prop! livered a number of years after the close began to prophesy about the same tir of the Babylonish captivity. Jerusalem It is evident finm the prophecy of H had then begun to be inhabited again, in gai, that the Jewasilad been restore! her own place by some of the Jewish the captivity long enough to build nation. 2. This prediction must un-| selves cie!4 houses, when he beg doubtedly refer to the re-peopling of the prophesy to them. Therefore !

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

ث

273

C.

1 Owen Rev. Dr. remparked on
Gambier, Lord

99

P.
God's Work
35 Partiality

84
Gospel, Bellamy on the
204| Patriarch, The Greek

230
God, Perfection of

215 252 Perpetuity and change of the Sabbath 101
Griffin's Speech
285 || Perfection of God

215 253
Grant's Speech

94|| The true Philosophy
II.
Pinkerton Rev. Mr.

99
Ileaven, Joys of
8|| Poynder, John Esq.

98
Hireling
226 Posey, Governor

120
Holiness, on desiring perfection in 58 Priest, The Budhist

231
I.

Prudential Committee, Report of 181
Illinois Territory

117

R.
Indiana Territory

120
Questions and Counsel

12
J.

R.
James Wm, Experience of

62
Reconciliation, Way of

137
Jews, Return of to their own land 5 36
Jews, London Society for promoting

Report of General Assembly on
state of Religion

14
Christianity among
242

24 28

Revelation, Song of Praise for
Justification, Discourse on

266

Revival of Religion in Princeton
K.
College

8
Kent, Duke of

98
Revivals of Religion

23 27 244
Kite, the

148
Righteous Rewarded

227
L.
Romans 9, 19, Disquisition on

39
Lenox, (Mass.) Revival of Religion
in

98
Romeyn Rev. Dr.
18 22

S.
Letter from Rev. Mr. Nott

138

Sanctification of Lord's day 18 22 197 149
Letter from Dr. Naudi

195

Sabbath Z. X. Y. on the 59 77 101 125
London Missionary Society

143

149 197 201 245 249
Lord's Day, Sanctification of 18 22 Sabbath, Institution of

77
M.
Sabbath

148
Minutes of General Missionary Salisbury, Moral Society

195
Society

19 23
Self Partiality

84
Massachusetts Missicnary Soci-

Senex

115
ety
47 69 117 Seward, Col. Death of

145
Missionary Tour

48 69 117
Scrap

148
M'Clure Fanny, Death of

73
Sermon, Rev. Mr. Beecher's

161
M’Bride Rev. Dr.

100
Slander Indirect

228
Mahometan Merchant

233
Sin, Thoughts on

36
Mail, Carrying of on Sabbath

125

Sin of Adam connected with his
Men, young, Address on education
of

posterity

155
29 53

Skenandon, Biographical Sketch of 287
Merrell Deacon, Death of

146
Minister's Duty

89
36

Squires' Mission
Speech of Charles Grant

94
Missionary Society of Connecticut 45
Mission, Squires'

285
Speech, Griffins'
89
Strait gate and broad way

123
Mills' and Smith's Mission 47 69 117
Missouri Territory

Sufferings do not obliterate Crimes 137

118
Moral Society of Salisbury

228
Subjects for Christian Conferences

195
N.

T.
Natchez
122 Tour, Missionary

48 69
Nassau Hall, questions and counsel Teignmouth Lord

98
for students of

12||Theological Miscellanies 35 58 136 226
Nandi Dr. Letter from
195|| Things of First Importance

116
New-Orleans
122||Thornton Henry Esq.

98
Niles' Ser. on Divine Perfection 253 215|| Thorp Rev. Dr.

98
Northest, Farl of
98 Thoughts on Sea-Shore

148
Norwich, Bishop of

99

U
Nott, Rev. Mr. Letter from
138 || Universalism indeed

24 28
G.

Utility not the foundation of Morality 87
Objections to Election answered 130 152

W.
Obituary
52 War, Thoughts on National

hy
Oneida Bible Society

188 Western Dist. Miss. Society 288 19 23
Ordination
52 Waste Places, Sermon on building

161

THE

UTICA CHRISTIAN MAGAZINE.

VOL. III.

JULY, 1815.

No. 1.

ure.

For the Utica Christian Magazine. literal Jerusalem. It is to be re-inhabitOf the return of the Jens to their own land ed in her own place, even in Jerusalem.

in the Millennium ; being a brief an- I woulu here ask every reader, whether swer to the difficulties suggested in a it be not evident, that the Holy Spirit piece wrillen by the late Dr. Edwards, designed to guard us in this passage and republished in the U. C. Mag. Vol. against a typical interpretation of JeruII. No. 10.

salem. 3. This passage must look for. 1. Let it be remarked, that the return ward to a re-peopling of Jerusalem by of the Jews to their own land in the Mil- the Jens. The city was inhabited when lenium, is not in itself a contradiction. Zechariah prophesied ; and it has been However difficult it may appear, it is not inhabited ever since. But the Jews, au absurdity.

its own proper inhabitants, have long 2. If it is an event which it is possible since been driven from it. The city is should take place, then it must be pos- now considered as stripped of its inhabsible for God to foretel it. There isitants, and is trodden down by the Genmuch figurative language in the Bible, tiles. But when the Jews shall be resbut it has not made it impossible for tored to their own land, then Jerusalern God to speak plainly, and without a fig-will, in the language of scripture, be in

The Bible is full of typical lan- habited again. That the sens are the guage ; but this has not made it impos people who are to repossess Jérusalemn sible for God to speak in literal language is eviilent from the context.

2. In conThere is a spiritual Jerusalem, it is bexion with the passage which we are granted : but it will not be denied that considering is that emine at prediction of there is also a literal Jerusalem. There Go:f's pouring out his spirit on the Jews, is a heavenly Canaan; but there is also which will lead them to look on Hiin a Canaan on earth. Now then, it can | whom they pierced, and mourn. And not be denied but that it is possible for as this undoubtedly peiers to their conGod to speak of the Canaan which lies version to christianity in the Millennium, on the Mediterranean sea, and of the it is vatural to suppose, that their again city Jerusalem; and so speak, as to make inhabiting Jerusalem, iš then to take it evident that this is the Canaan, and place. the Jerusalem which he intends. As this Perhaps it may be thought by some, will not be disputed, we are prepared, that the inhabiling of Jerusalem again,

3. To examine some passages of scrip- which is spoken of in this passage, ineans ture which seem to relate to this subject.lino more than to predict a great increase Let us first examine Zech. xii. 6. “Andil of its inhabitants by others soon returnJerusalem shall be inhabited again, in ing from Babylou, and also by natural her own place, even in Jerusalem. On population. To ihis it may be replied, this passage we note, 1. It is a prediction that by cospering Hag.i. 1, wita Zech. of what was then future; and it was de- i. l, it appears, that these two prophets livered a number of years after the close began to prophesy about the same time. of the Babylonish captivity. Jerusalem. It is evident froin the prophecy of Haghad then begun to be inhabited again, ingai, that the Jews iad been restored from her own place by some of the Jewish the captivity long enough to build theianation.

2. This prediction must un-il selves cieled houses, when he began to doubtedly refer to the re-peopling of the prophesy to them. Therefore Jerusa

a

a

lem must have been inhahited in part, threatened, that the literal Jerusalem, when Zechariah delivered the prediction from which they were espelled for their now under consideration. If the proph- unbelief, shall be trodden down by their et bad referred to a mere increase of the enemies until a certain time, it seems inhabitants who bad then begun to re naturally to follow ; that it is to be in the settle in the boly city, is it not strange hands of their enemies no longer, but is that he should make use of this pbraseol- then to revert back to its original iphabogy ;

“ Jerusalem shall be inbabited itants. again, in her own place, even in Jerusa- In this shiort essay it is not proposed lem." There was the place in which to collect all the proof which the scripthey were then beginning to inhabit it.ture will furnish in favor of a literal resBut the prophet appears to speak of toration of the Jews to the land of Casomething which, to an eye of sepse,|| naan : But in addition to the proof alwould appear almost incredible. There-ready adduced, I would refer my readers fore he doubles the expression, which to the 37th, 38th and 39th chapters of determines the very spot where Jerusa- Ezekiel. I would recommend that these lem shall be inhabited. It shall be in chapters be carefully read, with a view her own place. But where is this? It to obtain light on this subject. is even in Jerusalem. A more concise, In the 37th chapter we read of the reand, at the same time, definite answer animation of a valley of dry bones, which could not be given.

had become very dry. The dry bones The passage in' Luke xxi.. 24, which will apply more pertinently to the presis noticed by Dr. Edwards, appears 10ent state of the Jews, than to that state afford some proof in favor oi a literal re- they were in just before the return from turn of the Jews to their own land in the Babylon. And immediately after the Millennium. The passage is this : “ And account of the resurrection of the dry they shall fall by the edge of the sword, bones, there is an account of the re-unand shall be led away captive into all ion of Israel and Judah ler David, (i. e. nations : and Jerusalemn shall be trodden Messiah,) their king; represented by the down of the Gentiles, until the tiines of stick of Ephraim and the stick of. Judah the Gentiles be fulfilled."

becoming one in the hand of the prophHere it may be remarked, 1. That et. This must be a representation of a there can be no reasonable doubt but union between them, which has not yet that the people who were to be led taken place, but which will take place in away captive into all nations, were, in he Millennium. In connexion with the most iiteral sense, Jews. They were their re-union we hear this divine slecnot the Jews who were so inwardly. laration : “ Behold I will take the chilThat part of the nation who had the in-dren of Israel from among the heathen ward circumci-ion, were counted wor- whither they be gone, and will gather thy to escape this evil. Those who them on every side, and bring them inwere taken in Jerusalem by the Romans to their own land. And I will make them were mere Jews. 2. The Jerusalem one nation ir. the land upon the mounwhere they were taken, was evidently tains of Israel. And they shall dwell in the literal, and not the spiritual Jerusa- the land that I have given unto Jacob my lem. And this is the Jerusalem which servant, wherein your fathers have dwelt, was to be trodden down of the Gentiles. and they shall dwell therein, even they How unnatural it would be to suppose and their children, and their children's that in this passage it ineant the church children forever.” Here it is foretold, of Christ. 3. The prediction which is that in the millennial state, when Ephraim now before us, fixes a limit to the evil and Judah shall have become one peowhich was to be bronght on that wicked ple, they shall be brought to their own people. They were to be afflicied in the land-even the mountains of Israelmanner stated, until the times of the the same land which God gave to JaGentiles should be fulfilled. If their dis. ll cob his servant and the land wherein persion was literal, the ending of it may || their fathers dwelt. Now let it be serito expected to be literal. If they areously considered, in what more explicit

« PoprzedniaDalej »