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THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

MARY HOWITT.

MEMOIR OF MARY HOWITT.

Mary Howitt was born at Coleford, in Glouces. continued to reside till about twelve months ago, tershire, where her parents were making a tem- and are now living at Esher, in Surrey. porary residence; but shortly after her birth they Mary Howitt published jointly with her hus. returned to their accustomed abode at Uttoxeter, band two volumes of miscellaneous poems, in in Staffordshire, where she spent her youth. The 1823; and, in 1834, she gave to the world “The beautiful Arcadian scenery of this part of Staf- Seven Temptations,” a series of dramatic poems; fordshire was of a character to foster a deep love a work which, in other times, would have been of the country; and is described with great ac- alone sufficient to have made and secured a very curacy in her recent prose work, “ Wood Leigh- high reputation : her dramas are full of keen perton." By her mother she is descended from an ceptions, strong and accurate delineations, and ancient Irish family, and also from Wood, the ill- powerful displays of character. She afterwards

malignity of Dean Swift,-from whose aspersions popular ballads, a class of writing in which she his character was vindicated by Sir Isaac New. greatly excels all her contemporaries. She is also ton. A true statement of the whole affair may be well known to the young by her “Sketches of seen in Ruding's “ Annals of Coinage." Charles Natural History," "Tales in Versc," and other Wood, her grandfather, was the first who intro- productions written expressly for their use and duced platina into England from Jamaica, where pleasure. he was assay-master. Her parents being strict Mrs. Howitt is distinguished by the mild, un. members of the society of Friends, and her father affected, and conciliatory manners, for which “the

cution in the early days of Quakerism, her edu- able. Her writings, too, are in keeping with her cation was of an exclusive character; and her character: in all there is evidence of peace and knowledge of books confined to those approved good-will; a tender and a trusting nature; a genof by the most strict of her own people, till a tle sympathy with humanity; and a deep and later period than most young persons become ac- fervent love of all the beautiful works which the quainted with them. Their effect upon her mind Great Hand has scattered so plentifully before was, consequently, so much the more vivid. In those by whom they can be felt and appreciated. deed, she describes her overwhelming astonish. She has mixed but little with the world; the ment and delight in the treasures of general and home-duties of wife and mother have been to her modern literature, to be like what Keats says his productive of more pleasant and far happier re

upon him, through Chapman's “ Homer,”—as to she has made her reputation quietly but securely ; the astronomer,

and has laboured successfully as well as earnestly "When a new planet swims into his ken.” to inculcate virtue as the noblest attribute of an Among poetry there was none which made a English woman. If there be some of her con. stronger innpression than our simple old ballad, temporaries who have surpassed her in the higher which she and a sister near her own age, and of qualities of poetry,--some who have soared higher, similar taste and temperament, used to revel in, and others who have taken a wider range,—there making at the same time many young attempts are none whose writings are better calculated to in epic, dramatic, and ballad poetry. In her | delight as well as inform. Her poems are always twenty-first year she was married to William graceful and beautiful, and often vigorous; but Howitt, a gentleman well calculated to encourage they are essentially feminine: they afford evi. and promote her poetical and intellectual taste, - dence of a kindly and generous nature, as well himself a poet of considerable genius, and the au. as of a fertile imagination, and a safely-cultivated thor of various well-known works. We have rea- mind. She is entitled to a high place among the son to believe that her domestic life has been a Poets of Great Britain; and a still higher among singularly happy one. Mr. and Mrs. Howitt spent those of her sex by whom the intellectual rank the year after their marriage in Staffordshire. of woman has been asserted without presump. They then removed to Nottingham, where they tion, and maintained without display.

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Contents.

.. 112
.. ib.

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Page

Page

THE SEVEN TEMPTATIONS........

The Apple-Tree......................

The Poor Scholar ........................

The Heron ............................

Thomas of Torres ..................

The Rose of

... 114

The Pirate.....

The Dor-Hawk

115

The Old Man ..........

The Oak Tree..........

Raymond ........

The Carolina Parrot.....

... 116

Philip of Maine ...........

The Raven ........

.. 118

The Sorrow of Teresa ...

Flower Comparisons ............

.. ib.

Litue Streams............

... 119

HYMNS AND FIRE-SIDE VERSES .......

The Wolf..............

Marien's Pilgrimage:

The Passion-Flower ....

Part 1 ..................

The Reindeer ..........

Part II ...

The Ivy-Bush ...........

Part III ..........

Morning Thoughts........

Part IV....

The Pheasant ..............

26.

Part V....

Harvest Field-Flowers ......

.. 124

Part VI....

The Sea-Gull .......

Part VII...

Summer Woods ......

Part VIII ......

The Mandrake .....

.. 126

Part IX........

The Hedgehog .......

.. 127

Part X ........

The Cuckoo ................

.. ib.

Part XI....

The Hornet..............

... 128

Part XII...........

The Use of Flowers ........

. 129

Old Christmas ..........

The Carrion-Crow..........

. ib.

The Twelfth Hour ............

Buttercups and Daisies ........

130

The Blind Boy and his Sister .......

The Titmouse, or Blue-Cap........

The Spirit's Questionings ..........

Sunshine ........................

131

The Poor Child's Hymn.............

The Elephant....................

.. ib.

A Dream ............

The Wild Swan......

.. 132

The Boy of the Southern Isle :

The Mill-Stream ...

Part I...

Summer....

ib.

Part II ....

The Falcon..............

Part III ........................

The Child and the Flowers ........ .... 134

Easter Hymns :

The Flax-Flower ............

.... 135

Hymn I.-The Two Marys .........

The House-Sparrow ........

. 136

II.—The Angel ....

Childhood ...............

. 138

III.-The Lord Jesus ......

Birds .....

139

IV.-The Eleven .........

The Woodpecker ........

Com Fields .....................

The Harebell ..........

The Two Estates. ............

The Screech Owl ..........

ib.

Life's Matins..............

104 Flower Paintings...........

. 141

This World and the Next........

ib. L'Envoi.

..... ib.

A Life's Sorrow ................

The Old Friend and the New ....

SKETCHES OF NATURAL HISTORY:

The Coot.........................

....... 142

Mabel on Midsummer Day:

The Camel ...

... it.

Part I .........

Cedar Trees ...............

... 143

Part II ...

.. 108

The Monkey ............

.. ib.

A Christmas Carol.

.. 109

144

The Fossil Elephant .......

Little Children ......

110

• The Locust ..................

... 145

BIRDS AND FLOWERS, AND OTHER

The Broom-Flower ..........

COUNTRY THINGS:

The Eagle .........

The Stormy Peterel. .................... 110

The Nettle-King ..........

The Poor Man's Garden................. 111 |

The Bird of Paradise ......

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