Hell's Playground

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Moffat, Yard, 1912 - 447
 

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Strona 74 - And first, within the porch and jaws of hell Sat deep Remorse of Conscience, all besprent With tears; and to herself oft would she tell Her wretchedness, and, cursing, never stent To sob and sigh; but ever thus lament With thoughtful care, as she that all in vain Would wear and waste continually in pain. Her eyes...
Strona 74 - Tost and tormented with the tedious thought Of those detested crimes which she had wrought; With dreadful cheer, and looks thrown to the sky, Wishing for death, and yet she could not die. Next, saw we Dread, all trembling how he shook, With foot uncertain, profer'd here and there; Benumb'd with speech; and, with a ghastly look, Search'd every place, all pale and dead for fear, His cap borne up with staring of his hair...
Strona 257 - My Bonnie lies over the ocean, My Bonnie lies over the sea; My Bonnie lies over the ocean, Oh, bring back my Bonnie to me.
Strona 83 - ... drinking glasses. The carpet settee was the saddest looking implement of unrest eyes ever saw ; the flat-topped desk, with pigeonholes up the back, was littered with and jammed full of papers ;• the crude dining table and chairs were survivals of the fittest for many a scar they bore. • • • Huntingdon never before beheld such a drab, uncleanly, depressing human habitation. There was not one redeeming feature, one gentle touch, showing that civilized men dwelt therein. Spiders were everywhere,...
Strona 83 - ... sauce, bottles, corkscrews, and drinking glasses. The carpet settee was the saddest looking implement of unrest eyes ever saw; the flattopped desk, with pigeonholes up the back, was littered with and jammed full of papers; the crude dining table and chairs were survivals of the fittest for many a scar they bore. * * * Huntingdon never before beheld such a drab, uncleanly, depressing human habitation. There was not one redeeming feature, one gentle touch, showing that civilized men dwelt therein.
Strona 199 - I've enough for a glass of good beer, All amber and sparkling and clear. And the beer that you get When it's bitter and wet And the economic note is soundly stressed in the once popular— Come where the booze is cheaper.
Strona 119 - ... off." He continues to dilate upon the adverse conditions of African life, saying that, were it not for the monthly call of the steamers, no man could stand the sameness. Huntingdon, although vividly impressed with Smithson's misery, felt that the same could never come to him. "He was young, strong and healthy; he would put up a stiff fight; he would not go under.
Strona 293 - ... heavily tanned and in need of a shave. His movements are languid, and there is a lack of buoyancy in him voice. To look at him, it would seem as if five years had elapsed since his arrival. The effect of Africa upon Huntingdon, at one stage of his residence there, is said to have been as follows: "He was in no mood for anything save to drop on a divan; to give up to the vampire languor, who gnawed at his very vitals. • • • Huntingdon was going the way of Africa, and it would not be long...
Strona 27 - ... but such complete lassitude suddenly possessed him and so blinding were the sun-baked streets after the sea's undulating surface, that it was all he could do to keep his eyes open and remain upright. In positive agony he followed his friends, until, no longer able to endure, he cried : " I say, don't you chaps mind this infernal heat ? " " Of course we do,
Strona 80 - ... to improve his surroundings, and makes up a list of supplies which he thinks will render the place more habitable, and these he requests the skipper to bring by the next steamer. Turning to the book, it is seen that Huntingdon, upon his arrival at the station where he is to live, found awaiting him "a wooden bungalow set high on piles and surrounded by a great veranda, • • • furnished with dilapidated steamer chairs and a muchscarred table.

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