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THE

LONDON ENCYCLOPEDIA.

VOL. XVIII.

POTASH To ROME.

THE

LONDON ENCYCLOPEDIA,

UNIVERSAL DICTIONARY

SCIENCE, ART, LITERATURE, AND PRACTICAL MECHANICS,

COMPRISING A

POPULAR VIEW OF THE PRESENT STATE OF KNOWLEDGE.

, ILLUSTRATED BY

NUMEROUS ENGRAVINGS, A GENERAL ATLAS,

AND AI'l'KOlMUATK DIAGRAMS.

Sic oportet ad llbrun* prrscrtim miitclUnn generis, legenriuin accctlcrc lertorcm, ut *olet ail xouvivium couviva cmlii.
C»B*iTKtor anoititor omnibus satitfecere; «t tamea *i quid apponitur, quod bujas aui ilhus palato non respondeat, et hie cl
»lle urbane ditairoulant, et alia fercala probant, ne quid contriitent ronvivatorem. Erarmtu.

\ reader should ait down to a book, especially of the miscellaneous kind, aa a well-behaved visitor does to * bauquet. Tbc
anaster of the feast cieni hi rote) f to satisfy hii guests; but if, after all bif care and paint, something should appear on the
table that docs aoi soil this or that person's taste, they politely pass it over without notice, and commend nther dishes, thai
lbey »»»T tot distress a kind host- Translation.

BY THE ORIGINAL EDITOR OF THE ENCYCLOPAEDIA METROPOLITAN A,

ASSISTED BY EMINENT PROFESSIONAL AND OTHER GENTLEMEN.

IN TWENTY-TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. XVIII.

LONDON.
PRINTED FOR THOMAS TEGG, 73, CHEAPS1DE;

R. GRIFFIN & Co., GLASGOW; TEGG AND CO., DUBLIN; ALSO J. & S. A. TEGG,
SYDNEY AND HOBART TOWN.

1830.

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THE

LONDON ENCYCLOPAEDIA.

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Fr. and Belg. pot, in all the senses; Islandic and Dan. potte; Goth. poll. A vessel in which meat is boiled; any vessel to hold liquids; a cup: 'to go to pot,' to be destroyed or devoured: to pot is to preserve in pots: potable is a draught: potherb is a pot-hook and pot-lid ex

plain themselves: potslierd (pot and sherd, from Belg. scharrde; properly potshard), a fragment of a broken pot: pottage, any thing boiled for food. Jacob sod foliage, and Esau came from the fie»a feint. Genesis.

The woman left her water-pot, and went her way.

John. He on the ashes sits, his fate deplores; And with a potsherd scrapes the swelling sores.

Sandys. Toad that under the cold stone Sweltered, venom sleeping got; Boil thou first i' th' charmed pot. Shakspeare. Bnt that I think his father loves him not, I'd have him poisoned with a pot of ale. Id.

My thoughts are whirled like a potter'* wheel.

I learnt it in England, where they are most potent in potting. Id. Othello.

Thou best of gold art worst of gold. Other less fine in carat is more precious. Preserving life in medicine potable. Shakspeare. If I had a thousand sons, the first human principle I would teach them, should be to forswear thin Worunt, and to addict themselves to sack.

Id. Henry IV. At this day at Gaza, they couch potsherds of ves«e!s of earth in their walls to gather the wind from the top, and pass it in spouts into rooms.

Bacon's Natural History. Dig a pit upon the sea shore, somewhat above the high-water mark; and sink it as deep as the lowwater mark; and, as the tide cometh in, it will fill with water fresh and potable. Bacon.

The said potable gold should be endued with a capacity of being agglutinated and assimilated to the innate heat. Honey.

Rivers run potable gold. Milton's Paradise Lost.

Gigantic minds, as soon as work was done, To their huge pots of boiling pulse would run, Fell to with eager joy. Dryden.

Potted fowl and fish come in so fast, That ere the first is out the second stinks, And mouldy mother gathers on the brinks. Id. Whence come broken potsherds tumbling down. And leaky ware from garret windows thrown: Well may they break our heads. Id.

Some press the plants with sherds of potter's clay.

Id. Egypt baser than the beasts they worship; Below their potherb gods that grow in gardens.

Id. Vol, XVTTT._pAllT 1#

Let me see her Arabian pothooks. Id.

The sheep went first to pot, the goats next, and after them the oxen, and all little enough to keep life together. L'Estrange.

Whenever potters meet with any chalk or marl mixed with their clay, though it will with the clay hold burning, yet, whenever any water comes near any such pots after they are burnt, both the chalk and marl will slack and spoil their ware.

Mortimer.

Acorns, mast, and other seeds may be kept well, by being barrelled or potted up with moist sand.

Id.

A potter will not have any chalk or marl mixed with the clay. Id. Husbandry.

Pot them in natural, not forced earth; a layer of ncn mould beneath and about this natural earth to nourish the fibres, but not so as to touch the bulbs.

Evelyn. Where solar beams Parch thirsty human veins, the damasked meads Unforced display ten thousand painted flowers Useful in potables. Philips.

Sir Tristram telling us tobacco was a potherb, bid the drawer bring in t' other half pint. Taller.

Suppose your eyes sent equal rays

Upon two distant pots of ale,

Not knowing which was mild or stale. Prior. He like the potter in a mould has cast

The world's great fame. Id.

John's ready money went into the lawyers' pockets; then John began to borrow money upon the bank stock, now and then a farm went to pot.

Arbuthnot's History of John Bull.

Of alimentary leaves, the olera or potherbs afford an excellent nourishment; amongst those are the cole or cabbage kind. Arbuthnot.

The columella is a fine, thin, light, bony tube, the bottom of which spreads about, and gives it the resemblance of a wooden potlid in country houses.'

Derham.

A soldier drinks his pot, and then offers payment.

Swift.

Leaves eaten raw are termed sallad; if boiled, they become potherbs: and some of those plants which are vot-herbs in one family, are sallads in another. Watts.

For great the man, and useful, without doubt,
Who seasons pottage, or expels the gout;
Whose science keeps life in, and keeps death out.

Harte.

POTAGER, n. s. From Pottage. A porringer.

An Indian dish or potager, made of the bark of a tree, with the sides and rim sewed together after the manner of twiggen-work. Greta's Museum.

POTAMOGETON, pond weed, a genus of the tetragynia order, and tetrandria class of plants; natural order fifteenth, inundatse: Cal. none; petals four; no style, and four seeds. There are twelve species, all of them vegetables floating on the surface of stagnant waters, affording agreeable shade to fish, and food to cattle.

B

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