Western Intellectuals and the Soviet Union, 1920-40: From Red Square to the Left Bank

Przednia okładka
Routledge, 17 paź 2006 - 276

Despite the appalling record of the Soviet Union on human rights questions, many western intellectuals with otherwise impeccable liberal credentials were strong supporters the Soviet Union in the interwar period. This book explores how this seemingly impossible situation came about.

Focusing in particular on the work of various official and semi-official bodies, including Comintern, the International Association of Revolutionary Writers, the All-Union Society for Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries, and the Foreign Commission of the Soviet Writers' Union, this book shows how cultural propaganda was always a high priority for the Soviet Union, and how successful this cultural propaganda was in seducing so many Western thinkers.

 

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Spis treści

Introduction
1
From attraction to action
10
The origins of Soviet cultural propaganda
35
Propaganda through coercion
46
The closing years
68
VOKS in the 1920s
86
VOKS in the 1930s
112
7 VOKS and the famous foreigners
132
Foreign Commission of the Soviet Writers Union and French writers
164
Epilogue
189
Notes
195
Bibliography
232
Index
244
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Informacje o autorze (2006)

Ludmila Stern is Senior Lecturer in the School of Modern Language Studies at the University of New South Wales, Australia, where she coordinates Russian Studies, and Interpreting and Translation Studies. She has published on VOKS and French intellectuals, and her other research interests include courtroom interpreting (Australian War Crimes Prosecutions and ICTY).

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