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E II.

ato's house.

Benedick, and Leonato.

till your marriage be toward Arragon. cher, my lord, if you'll

ld be as great a soil in age, as to show a child to wear it. I will only is company; for, from e sole of his foot, he is Llirice cut Cupid's bownan dares not shoot at und as a bell, and his at his heart thinks, his

Scene II. ABOUT NOTHING,
as, to be a Dutchman to-day; a Frenchman to-mor-
TOW; or in the shape of two countries at once, 1
German from the waist downward, all slop; and a
Spaniard from the hip upward, no doublet : unless
he have a fancy to this foolery, as it appears he hath,
he is no fool for fancy, as you would have it appear
he is.

Claud. If he be not in love with some woman,
there is no believing old signs: he brushes lis hat
o'mornings ; what should that bode!
D. Pedro. Hath any man seen him at the barber's!

Claud. No, but the barber's man hath been seen
with him; and the old ornament of his cheek hath
already stuffed tennisballs.

Leon. Indeed, he looks younger thau he did, by the loss of a beard.

D. Pedro. Nay, he rubs himself with civet: can you smell him out by that?

Claud, That's as much as to say, the sweet youth's in love.

D. Pedro. The greatest note of it is his melan. choly.

Claud, And when was he wont to wash his face?

D. Pedro. Yea, or to paint himself? for the which,
I hear what they say of him.

Claud. Nay, but his jesting spirit; which is now
crept into a lutestring, and now governed by stops.

D. Pedro. Indeed, that tells a heavy tale for him: conclude, conclude, he is in love,

Claud. Nay, but I know who loves him.

D. Pedro, 'That would I know too; I warrant, one that knows him not.

Claud: Yes, and his ill conditions ; and, in de. spite of all, dies for him.

D. Pedro. She shall be buried with ber face wards,

Bene. Yet is this no charm for the tooth-ach-Old signior, walk aside with me: I have studied ciglit of

[graphic]

as I have been.
you are sadder.
ve.
Lant; there's no true
uly touchi'd with love:

rst, and draw it after

the tooth-ach? ur, or a worm ? master a grief, but he

ve.

cance of fancy in him,

to strange disguises;

up

* Large loose breeches.

as, to be a Dutcliman to-day; a Frenchman to-morTow; or in the shape of two countries at once, as a German from the waist dowoward, all slop*; and a Spaniard from the hip upward, so doublet : valess he have a fancy to this foolery, as it appears he hath, he is no fool for fancy, as you would have it appear he is.

Claud. If he be not in love with some woman, there is no believing old sigus; he brushes liis hat o'mornings; what should that bode?

D. Pedro. Hath any man seen hiin at the barber's?

Claud. No, but the barber's man hath been seen with him; and the old ornament of his cheek hatls already stuffed tennis-balls.

Leon. Indeed, he looks younger thau he did, by the loss of a beard.

D. Pedro. Nay, he rubs himself with civet: can you smell him out by that?

Claud. That's as much as to say, the sweet youth's in love.

D. Pedro. The greatest vote of it is his melan. choly.

Claud, And when was he wont to wash his face?

D. Pedro. Yea, or to paint himself? for the which, I hear what they say of him.

Claud. Nay, but his jesting spirit; which is now crept into a lutestring, and now governed by stops.

D. Pedro. Indeed, that tells a heavy tale for him: conclude, conclude, be is in love.

Claud. Nay, but I know who loves him.

D. Pedro. That would I know too; I warrant, one that knows him not.

Claud. Yes, and his ill conditions; and, in de. spite of all, dies for him.

D. Pedro. She shall be buried with ber face upwards.

Bene. Yet is this no charm for the tooth-ach. Old signior, walk aside with me: I have studied eiglit or

* Large loose breeches.

I ADO

Act III. Co you, which these hobby

at Benedick and Leonato. , to break with him about

Cero and Margaret have.bg h Beatrice; and then the another, when they meet. n John. rother, God save you. -rother. e served, I would speak

Scene III. ABOUT NOTHING.
wickedness; I could say, she were worse; think you
of a worse title, and I will fit her to it. Wonder tot
till further warrant: go but with me to-night, you
shall see her chamber-window entered ; even the
night before her wedding-day: if you love her then,
to-morrow wed her; but it would better fit your bo.
nour to change your mind.

Claud. May this be so.
D. Pedro. I will not think it.
D. John. If you dare not trust that you see, con
fess not that you know: if you will follow me, I will
show

you enough; and when you have seen more,
and heard more, proceed accordingly.

Claud. If I see any thing to night why I should not marry her to morrow; in the congregation, where I should wed, there will I shame her.

D. Pedro. Aud, as I wooed for thee to obtain
her, I will join with thee to disgrace ber.

D. John. I will disparage her no farther, till you
are my witnesses : bear it coldly but till midnight,
and let the issue show itself.
D. Pedro. O day uptowardly turned !
Claud. O mischief strangely thwarting!

D. John. Oplague right well prevented!
So will you say, when you have seen the sequel.

(Excunt.

ou;- yet count Claudio

speak of concerns him. atter? dship to be married to

[To Claudio. does.

when he knows what I

mpediment, I pray you

I love you not; let that ter at me by that I now , I think, he holds you art hath holp to effect -ly, suit ill spent, and

SCENE III.

e matter? cell you; and, circumch been too long a talk

A street.

to's Hero, your Hero,

Enter Dogberry and Verges, with the Watch,
Dogb. Are you good men and true?

Verg. Yea, or else it were pity but they should
suffer salvation, body and soul.

Dogb. Nay, that were a punishment too good for them, if they should have any allegiance in them, being chosen for the prince's watch.

good to paint out her

wickedness; I could say, she were worse; think you of a worse title, and I will fit her to it. Wonder not till further warrant: go but with me to-night, you shall see her chamber-window entered; even the viglit before her wedding-day: if you love her then, to-morrow wed her; but it would better fit your honour to change your mind.

Claud. May this be so.
D. Pedro. I will not think it.

D. John. If you dare not trust that you see, confess not that you know: if you will follow me, I will show you enough; and when you have seen more, and heard more, proceed accordingly.

Claud. If I see any thing to night why I should not marry her to morrow; in the congregation, where I should wed, there will I shame her.

D. Pedro. And, as I wooed for thee to obtain her, I will join with thee to disgrace her.

D. John. I will disparage her no farther, till you are my witnesses: bear it coldly but till midnight, and let the issue show itself.

D. Pedro. O day untowardly turned !
Claud. O mischief strangely thwarting!

D. John. Oplague right well prevented!
So will you say, when you have seen the sequel.

(Exeunt.

SCENE III.

A street.

Enter Dogberry and Verges, with the Watch.
Dogb. Are you good men and true?

Verg. Yea, or else it were pity but they should suffer salvation, body and soul.

Dogb. Nay, that were a punishment too good for them, if they should have any allegiance in them, being chosen for the prince's watch.

ADO

Act III, their charge, neighbour

you the most desartless

e, sir, or George Seacoal;
1.
chbour Seacoal. God hath
me to be a well-favoured

but to write and read

master constable, ew it would be your anbur, sir, why, give God of it; and for your writ. ppear when there is no are thought here to be man for the constable of Pou the lantern: this is prehend all vagrom men: d, in the prince's name. not stand? note of him, but let him rest of the watch toge. e rid of a knave.

when he is bidden, he

Scene III. ABOUT NOTHING

Dogb. Why then, let them alone till they are ber; if they make you ont then the better sent, you may say, they are not the men you took them for,

2. Watch. Well, sir.

Dogb. If you meet a thief, you may suspect him,
by virtue of your office, to be no true man: and, for
such kind of men, the less you meddle or make with
them, wing, the more is for your honesty.

Watch. If we know him to be a thief, shall we
Bot lay bands on him?

Dogb. Truly, by your office, you may; but I
think, they that touch pitch will be defiled: the
most peaceable way for you, if you do take a thief,
is, to let him show himself what he is, and steal out
of your company.

Verg. You have been always called a merciful
man, partner.

Dogb. Truly, I would not hang a dog by my will; much more a man who hath any honesty in him.

Verg. If you hear a child cry in the niglit, you must call to the nurse, and bid her stillit.

2 Watch. How if the nurse be asleep, and will not hear us?

Dogb. Why then departin peace, and let the child
wake her with crying: for the ewe that will not hear
her lamb when it baes, will never answer a calf when
he bleats.

Verg. 'Tis very true.
DogbThis is the end of the charge. You, con-
stable, are to present the prince's own person; if you
meet the prince in the night, you may stay him.

Verg. Nay by’r lady, that I think he cannot.
Dogb. Five shillings to one on't, with any man
that knows the statues, he may stay him : marry,
not without the prince be willing: for, indeed, the
watch ought to offend no man; and it is an offence
to stay a man against his will.

Verg. Hy'r lady, I think, it be so.
Dogb. Ha, ha, ba! Well, masters, good night:

-ts.

e to meddle with none
ou shall also make no
be watch to babble and
ot to be endured.
eep than talk; we know

e an ancient and most not see how sleeping -are that your bills* be co call at all the ale. drunk get them to bed. not?

vatchmen.

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