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life in you.

Whoso eateth My flesh, and drinketh My blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. For My flesh is meat indeed, and My blood is drink indeed. He that eateth My flesh, and drinketh My blood, dwelleth in Me, and I in him. As the living Father hath sent Me, and I live by the Father; so he that

eateth Me, even he shall live by Me. 2. Human Testimony.

Confessions. 2 Helvetic, c. xix. Gallican, Art. xxxiv.

Westminster, c. xxvi. § 1. Scotland, Art. xxi. Belgic,
Art. xxxiii.

PROP. IV. There are two Sacraments ordained of CHRIST our LORD
in the Gospel, that is to say, Baptism and the Supper of the LORD.
1. Baptism is one of the two Sacraments ordained by CHRIST our

LORD in the Gospel.
A. Divine Testimony.

New Testament. Matt. xxviii. 19, “Go ye and

teach all nations, baptizing them in the Name of
the FATHER, and of the Son, and of the HOLY

Ghost.”—Mark xvi. 15, 16. Acts ü. 38.
B. Human Testimony.

Fathers. Just. Mart. 1 Apol. c. lxxix. lxxx. Tertull.

de Baptism. cc. i. and iv. De Virg. Veland. c. ii.

de Anim. c. i.
2. The Supper of the LORD is the second of the two Sacraments

ordained by CHRIST our LORD in the Gospel.
A. Divine Testimony.

New Testament. 1 Cor. xi. 23–26, “For I have

received of the LORD that which also I delivered unto you, That the LORD JESUS the same night in which He was betrayed took bread: and when He had given thanks, He brake it, and said, Take, eat : this is My body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of Me. After the same manner also He took the cup, when He had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in My blood : this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of Me." _See also Matt. xxvi. 26-28. 2 Cor. xii. 13. 1 Pet. iii. 21.

B. Human Testimony.
a. Fathers. Just. Mart. 1 Apol. c. lxxxv. Tertull.

de Coron. Milit. c. ii. Advers. Marc. lib. iv.
c. xxxiv. August. de Symb. ad Catech. 15,
vol. VI. p. 562. De Doctrin. CHRISTI, lib. III. c. ix.
tom. 111. col. 37, Ed. Bened. Antw. Chrysost.
ad loan. Hom. Lxxxv. vol. 11. pp. 914, 915.
Orat. de Sacerd. Ili, vol. vi. p. 15. August.

Ep. ad Januar. Ep. c. xviii.
b. Confessions. 1 Helvetic, Art. xx.

1 Helvetic, Art. xx. 2 Helvetic,

Basil, Art. v. 2. Westminster, c. xxvii. § 4. Bohemian, c. xi. Saxon, Art. xii. Gallican, Art. xxxv. Scotland, Art. xxi. Belgic, Art. xxxiii. Sueveland, Art. xvi.

c. xix.

Prop. V. Those five commonly called Sacraments, that is to say, Con-
firmation, Penance, Orders, Matrimony, and Extreme Unction, are
not to be counted for Sacraments of the Gospel.'
A. Confirmation is not to be counted for a Sacrament of the

Gospel.
1. Divine Testimony.

Negative. There is no warrant of Scripture for

counting it for a Sacrament of the Gospel.

4 Council of Trent, sess. vii. can. 1, “If any shall say, that the Sacraments are more or fewer than seven, or that any one of these seven is not truly and properly a sacrament, – let him be accursed.” Creed of Pope Pius IV., Art. 3, “I also profess, that there are truly and properly seven Sacraments of the New Law, instituted by Jesus Christ our LORD, and necessary for the salvation of mankind, though not all for every one; to wit, Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Penance, Extreme Unction, Orders, Matrimony; and that they confer grace; and that of these, Baptism, Confirmation, and Orders cannot be reiterated without sacrilege: I also receive and admit the received and approved ceremonies of the Catholic Church, used in the solemn administration of all the aforesaid Sacraments."-See also Catech. par. 11. § xviii. Hugh of St. Victor, A.D. 1120, and Peter Lombard, lib. iv. dist. 2, A.D. 1141, gave consistency to the notion that there are seven Sacraments. The Council of Florence, A.D. 1439, Council of Senes, and Council of Trent, sess. VII. Canon 1. established the notion. Peter Lombard imagined that Zech. iv. 2, 10; Rev. i. 4; ii. 1 ; iv. 5, intimated a sevenfold sacramental energy.

5 Council of Trent, sess. vii. decreed three canons on Confirmation, of which the first anathematizes any one who shall deny that Confirmation is a true and proper Sacrament.

2. Human Testimony.

a. Father. Cyprian, Epist. LXXIII. p. 202.
b. Councils. Elibertine, can). XXXVIII. vol. 1. 254.

Arles 1, can. VIII. Adversaries, Alex. Alensis,
p. 4, quæst. 9. Bonaventura, sent. lib. iv. dist. 7,

§ 2. Biel, sent. 4, dist. 7. B. Penance is not to be counted for a sacrament of the Gospel. a. Divine Testimony.

Negative. There is no warrant of Scripture for counting

it for a sacrament of the Gospel. b. Human Testimony. u. Fathers. Chrysost. C. xii, ad Hebr. Hom. xxxi., “I will

thee not to betray thyself openly nor to accuse thyself before others, but I advise thee to obey the prophet, saying, Open thy way unto the LORD.”—See also in Ps. Quinquag. Hom. Li, tom. I. cols. 744, 745. De Pænit. Hom. Iv. tom. II. p. 307. De Laz. conc. IV. tom. I. p. 758. August. de Confess. lib. x. c. iii. Ambros.

sup:

Luc. De Pæn. dist. 1, caput Petrus. Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, A.D. 668, in Corp. Jur. Canon. Lugd. 1634. Decret. Gratian, dec.-sec. pars. De Pænit. dist. 1, can. sc. col. 1718,

also can. XXXII, and XXXVI. B. Confessions. Augsburg, Art. iii. xvii. Wirtemburg,

Arts. ix. xii. 2 Helvetic, c. xiv. Saxon, Art. xvi.

Sueveland, c. xx. C. Orders are not to be counted for a sacrament of the Gospel. a. Divine Testimony. Negative. There is no warrant of Scripture for counting

it for a sacrament of the Gospel. b. Human Testimony.

Confession. 2 Helvetic, c. xix.

6 See Trent Catechism on Penance, $f 17, 19; also Sess. XIV. cc. i.ix.

The Romanists seek to establish a sacramental nature for penance by their mistranslation of the Greek words μετάνοια and μετανοώ. Now the word μεταvoia means a change of mind, and yetavosiv to change your mind, and therefore it is most unfair to render Matt. iii. 2, netavosite, agite pænitentiam (vulgate) do penance (Douay version). Penance demands auricular confession, which was not deemed absolutely necessary until the time of Leo the Great.

7 Council of Trent, sess. XXIII., decreed eight canons on the so-called Sacrament of Orders. - See Trent Catechism, ý 20.

D. Matrimonys is not to be counted for a sacrament of the Gospel.

Divine Testimony.
Negative. There is no warrant of Scripture for counting

it for a sacrament of the Gospel.
E. Extreme Unction is not to be counted for a sacrament of the

Gospel.
a. Divine Testimony.

Negative. There is no warrant of Scripture for count

ing it for a sacrament of the Gospel. b. Human Testimony.

Confessions. Romanist, Cajet. on Epist. of Jam. v.

p. 419. Confession, Saxony, Art. xix. $ 2.

Prop. VI. Those five commonly called Sacraments, that is to say,

Confirmation,' Penance, Orders, Matrimony, and Extreme Unction, are such as have grown partly of the corrupt following of the Apostles, and partly are states of life allorced in the Scriptures. A. Those five commonly called Sacraments, that is to say, Con

firmation, Penance, Orders, Matrimony, and Extreme Unction,
have grown (to be so called) of the corrupt following of the

Apostles.
B. Those five commonly called Sacraments are partly states of

life allowed in the Scriptures.

Prop. VII. Confirmation, Penanoe, Orders, Matrimony, and Extreme

Unction, have not like nature of Sacraments with Baptism and
the Lord's Supper.
A. Confirmation has not like nature of a sacrament with Baptism

and the LORD's Supper.
It falls short of the nature of a sacrament as to divine

institution and form.

8 Council of Trent, sess. XXIV., decreed twelve canons on the so-called Sacrament of Matrimony.

The Romanists count Matrimony for a sacrament upon the mistranslation of pivotýptov (in Ephes. v. 32) into “ Sacramentum.' 9 Council of Trent, sess.

xiv., has three chapters and four canons on Extreme Unction.-See also Trent Catechism.

In the Hampton Court Conference, A.D. 1604, the Puritans alleged that this Article made Confirmation a corrupt following of the Apostles. The meaning of the words in the Article is so plain that the objection must be regarded as an “ unimportant cavil."

B. Penance.

It falls short of the nature of a sacrament as to divine insti

tution. Contrition,' which is one part of Penance, is inward, and therefore not an outward or visible sign. Confession (auricular), another part of Penance, was first brought in by Pope Leo I. Satisfaction, a third part (s0 called) of Penance, follows absolution, and therefore is

improperly reckoned a part of it. C. Orders.

It falls short of the nature of a sacrament in regard to form.

It belongs only to one class of persons, whereas Baptism

and the LORD's Supper are common to all true christians. D. Matrimony

It falls short of the nature of a sacrament both as to matter

and form. It was not instituted by CHRIST. E. Extreme Unction."

It falls short of the nature of a sacrament as to divine insti

tution and form.

Prop. VIII. Confirmation, Penance, Orders, Matrimony, and Extreme
Unction, have not any visible sign or ceremony ordained of God.
A. Confirmation has not any visible sign or ceremony ordained

of God.
B. Penance has not any visible sign or ceremony ordained of

God.
C. Orders have not any visible sign or ceremony ordained of

God.
D. Matrimony has not any visible sign or ceremony ordained of

God.
E. Extreme Unction has not any visible sign or ceremony or-

dained of God.

Prop. IX. The Sacraments were not ordained of CHRIST to be gazed upon, or to be carried about, but that we should duly use them. A. Sacraments were not ordained of Christ to be gazed upon.

See Art. XXVIII. Prop. VIII. 2 The Gloss de Pænit. dist. I. c. i., “If we look narrowly to the matter, remission of sins is to be attributed to the grace of God, and not to contrition.'

3 Jam. v. 14, is plainly to be understood of the miraculous gift of healing, which has long ceased in the Church.

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