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ARTICLE XIV.

ATICULUS XIV.

ARTICLE XIV.

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De Operibus Supererogationis.' Of Works of Supererogation. OPERA quæ supererogationis Voluntary Works, besides,

appellant, non possunt sine over and above God's Comarrogantia et impietate præ- mandments, which they call dicari. Nam illis declarant Works of Supererogation, canhomines, non tantum se Deo not be taught without arrogancy reddere quæ tenentur, sed and impiety. For by them men plus in ejus gratiam facere, do declare, that they do not quam deberent: cum aperte only render unto God as much Christus dicat; cum feceritis as they are bound to do, but omnia quæcunque præcepta that they do more for His sake sunt vobis, dicite, servi inutiles than of bounden duty is re

quired: whereas Christ saith
plainly, When ye have done
all that are commanded to
you, say, We are unprofitable

servants.
The Phraseology of this Article.
1. When compared with Article XIII. of those of 1552.
A. In the Latin.
1552.

1562, 1571.
Title, Opera Supereroga De Operibus Supereroga-
tionis

tionis,
B. In the English.
iniquity

impiety.
that are commanded

that are commanded to you.

i Compare with this Article the decisions of the Council of Trent, Sess. VI., Cans. 1 and 10, and Rhemes on 2 Cor. viii. 14.

I tito

2. When the English and Latin are compared together. No corresponding Latin Voluntary works, besides, over

and above God's command

ments. quam deberent

than of bounden duty is re

quired. aperte

plainly. Three PROPOSITIONS. I. Voluntary works, besides, over and above God's commandments,

which they call works of supererogation, cannot be taught

without arrogancy and impiety. II. By works of supererogation men do declare that they do not only

render unto God as much as they are bound to do, but that

they do more for His sake than of bounden duty is required. III. CHRIST (condemns the doctrine of works of supererogation, when

He) saith plainly, When ye have done all things that are commanded to you, say, We are unprofitable servants.

PROP. I. Voluntary works, besides, over and above God's command

ments, which they call works of supererogation, cannot be taught without arrogancy and impiety. 1. The Testimony of Reason.'

Because such a doctrine makes men copartners with CHRIST

in the work of redemption. Because the doctrine is inconsistent with every man's per

sonal responsibility. 2. Divine Testimony. A. Old Testament. Job xxxv. 7, “ If thou be righteous, what

givest thou Him? or what receiveth He of thine hand?” -See also Josh. i. 7. 1 Chron. xxix. 14. 2 Chron. vi. 36.

Job ix. 20; xli. 11. Ps. xlix. 7 ; cxix. 96. Ezek. xx. 19. B. New Testament. Matt. xxv. 9, “But the wise answered,

saying, Not so; lest there be not enough for us and you: but go ye rather to them that sell, and buy for

1 Puffendorf de Jure Nat. et Gent. 1. ix. 5: admirably reasons, “The spring of merit principally, is performing a work not due, and which another hath not a right to require of us ; for, he that doth that unto which he is perfectly obliged, only fulfils his obligation, and hath nothing redundant, from which merit can arise. From whence it is manifest, that no merit with God can accrue to any mortal, even though he should exactly, and as he ought, obey and fulfil the Divine Law.”

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yourselves.”—See also Matt. xv. 9; xx. 9, 10. Luke xviii. 22. Gal. i. 8. Phil. iii. 12. Col. ii. 8, 20, 23.

1 Thess. v. 17. Rev. ii. 10. 3. Human Testimony. A. Fathers. Cyprian, Testim. lib. III. c. iv., “We must not

glory in any thing, since nothing is our own, as it is written in the Gospel of St. John, (iii. 27), A man can receive nothing, except it be given him from heaven."See also Basil in Ps. xlviii. vol. 1. p. 239. August. cont. duas Epist. Pelag. lib. iv.6, vol. x. ad Ioan. Tract. Ixxxiv.

2, vol. III. B. Confessions. Augsburg, Art. xx. 2 Helvetic, c. xvi.

Basil, Art. x. Gallican, Art. xxiv. Belgic, Art. xii. Saxon, Arts. iii. xvii. Wirtemburg, vi. Westminster, c. xvi. 9 4.

PROP. II. By works of supererogation men do declare, that they do not

only render unto God as much as they are bound to do, but that they do more for His sake than of bounden duty is required.' 1. Divine Testimony. A. Old Testament. Job xli. 11, “Who hath prevented

Me, that I should repay him ? whatsoever is under the whole heaven is Mine.”—See also Lev. xviii. 5. Job

xxii. 2, 3; xxxv. 7. B. New Testament. Matt. v. 48, “Be ye therefore perfect,

even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect."-See

also Matt. v. 19; vii. 7; xxviii. 20. Mark ix. 7. 2. Human Testimony. A. Fathers. Hilar, ad Matt. xxvii. 5, To whom they

answered that they were not able to give; lest haply there might not be enough for all. That no one, forsooth, could be helped by another's works and merits, because it is necessary for every one to buy oil for his own lamp.”—Comp. Tertull. de Pudicit. c. xxii.

. In the second century certain doctors maintained that Christ had established a double rule of sanctity and virtue, for two different orders of Christians. Of these rules the one was ordinary, the other extraordinary. They called the former precepts, as obligatory upon all men, and the latter counsels, as relating to Christians of a more sublime rank. Works done in compliance with counsels are works of supererogation.

Prop. III. CHRIST (condemns the doctrine of works of supererogation

when He) saith plainly, When ye have done all things that are commanded to you, say, We are unprofitable servants. 1. Divine Testimony. A. Old Testament. 1 Chron. xxix. 14, “ All things come

of Thee, and of Thine own have we given Thee."-See

also Ps. xvi. 2. B. New Testament. Luke xvii. 9, “Doth he thank that

servant because he did the things that were commanded him? I trow not.”_See also Matt. xxv. 30. Luke x. 27; xviii. 10-14. Rom. ii. 12; xi. 35. 1 Cor. vi. 20;

ix. 16, 17. Philemon, 19. 2. Human Testimony.

A. Father. See Cyprian, Testim. lib. III. c. li., in which he

makes use of the text, Luke xvii. 10. B. Confession. Scotland, Art. xv.

ARTICLE XV.

ARTICULUS XV.

ARTICLE XV.

De CHRISTO, qui solus est sine Of CHRIST alone without sin.

peccato. CHRISTUS, in nostræ na Christ in the truth of our

turæ veritate, per omnia nature, was made like unto similis factus est nobis, excepto us in all things, sin only except, peccato, a quo prorsus erat from which he was clearly void, immunis, tum in carne tum in both in His flesh and in His spiritu. Venit ut agnus, absque spirit. He came to be the macula, qui mundi peccata per Lamb without spot, who, by immolationem sui semel factam sacrifice of Himself once made, tolleret, et peccatum (ut in- should take away the sins of quit Johannes) in eo non erat: the world, and sin (as St. John sed nos reliqui etiam baptizati, saith) was not in him. But all et in Christo regenerati, in we the rest, although baptized, multis tamen offendimus omnes. and born again in CHRIST, yet Et si dixerimus quod peccatum offend in many things; and if non habemus, nos ipsos sedu we say we have no sin, we cimus, et veritas in nobis non deceive ourselves, and the truth est.

is not in us.

The Phraseology of this Article.
1. As compared with Article XIV. of those of 1552.
A. In the Latin.
1552.

1562, 1571.
Title. Nemo præter CHRIS- De CHRISTO, qui solus est
TUM est sine peccato.

sine peccato. Venit ut agnus absque ma Venit ut agnus absque macula esset

cula. et si dixerimus quia

et si dixerimus quod.

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