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THE •

LIFE AND TIMES

OF

JOHN BUN Y A N.

BY

REV. GEORGE B. CHEEVER, D.D.

WITH A PREFACE

BY REV. INGRAM COBBIN, A. M.

LONDON:

AYLOTT AND JONES, 8, PATERNOSTER ROW.

1846.

740.

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LONDON: PRINTED BY KNIGHT AND SON, HOLLOWAY.

PREFACE.

DR. CHEEVER is deservedly in high repute in the United States, and is advantageously known as the editor of “The New York Evangelist," but more so as the author of “LECTURES ON THE Pilgrim's PROGRESS," and on “THE LIFE AND TIMES OF John BUNYAN.” The latter are the first Lectures of the series, and are here separated, as forming in themselves a highly interesting work.

The author has commenced with a graphic sketch of the times of Bunyan, touched with a masterly hand. There needs no apology for his high praises of Cromwell, for he writes as a republican; nor for the stigma he attaches to the second Charles--for all the statues erected to his honour, will never redeem his reputation. Had Cromwell been a legitimate sovereign, he would have been as much praised as he is now abused; and had his profligate and persecuting successor not been of the royal race, few would have ventured to become his apologists.

But the chief subject of these Lectures is that to which the attention of the reader will not fail to be attracted. This little volume is a necessary and appropriate introduction to the knowledge of “THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS." The gifted author has found the real key to unlock all that admired allegory, and has blended Bunyan and his Pilgrim in so convincing and beautiful a manner, that the reader becomes riveted to his pages. The lecturer has kindled his lamp at the same altar with Bunyan : he is imbued with all his spirit and with all his poetry; and, inspired with a holy enthusiasm, he has absolutely thrown a halo of brighter glory around his immortal work.

To recommend these pages is really a hazardous task, for it exposes the eulogist to the charge of presumption: it is like colouring a diamond, or aiming to gild a sunbeam.

The only apology for such an act is, that the inimitable author is not yet much known in England; but it

may safely be prognosticated that this apology will very soon be superseded.

INGRAM COBBIN.

CAMBERWELL,

Nov. 1, 1845.

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