The Doll

Przednia okładka
Central European University Press, 1 sty 1996 - 683
9 Recenzje
Nie weryfikujemy opinii, ale staramy się wykrywać i usuwać fałszywe treści
About the Central European Classics series:

"Half a continent's worth of forgotten genius."--The Guardian

The new Central European Classics series was born some ten years ago in the dim cafes of Budapest and Prague when General Editor Timothy Garton Ash began jotting down titles recommended to him by local writers. Its aim is to take these works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century classic fiction "out of the ghetto," onto the shelves of Western booksellers, and into the consciousness of Western readers.
The result of extensive discussion among writers, scholars, and critics, the rich tradition of Central European fiction has been culled to offer previously unavailable works written in Czech, Hungarian, and Polish that lend themselves perfectly to powerful and accurate translation. Specially commissioned introductions by leading Central European writers explain why these titles have become classics in their own country, while at the same time, the works stand on their own as great literature in English. With future titles such as a new edition of Boleslaw Prus's Polish masterpiece, The Doll, the Central European Classics series will contribute to a deeper understanding of the culture and history of countries which, since the opening of iron curtain, have been coming closer to us in many other ways.

The city of Warsaw, under Russian rule in the late 1870s, is the setting for this sweeping panorama of social conflict, political tensions, and personal suffering. The middle-aged hero, Wokulski, bold and successful in business, is being destroyed by his obsessive love for the frigid, aristocratic society "doll," Izabela. The embattled aristocracy, the new men of finance, Dickensian tradesmen, and the urban poor all come vividly to life on the vast, superbly detailed canvas against which Wokulski's personal tragedy is played out.
For this edition, the existing translation by David Welsh has been carefully revised under the supervision of the leading Polish critic, Stanislaw Bara'nczak. A chapter excised by the Tsarist censor is included as an appendix. Bara'nczak also contributes to an authoritative and illuminating new introduction to what is arguably the greatest Polish novel of the nineteenth century.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Recenzja użytkownika  - JohnJGaynard - LibraryThing

In writing this majestic novel about fin de siècle 19th century Warsaw, Prus illustrated all the social currents that would make Poland such a cauldron of differing identities in the following century ... Przeczytaj pełną recenzję

LibraryThing Review

Recenzja użytkownika  - xuebi - LibraryThing

In The Doll, Bolesław Prus has created an intimate yet epic, extremely detailed portrayal of late-nineteenth century Warsaw seen through the lives of a varied cast, but most of all focusing on three ... Przeczytaj pełną recenzję

Wybrane strony

Spis treści

The Doll
xvii
A censored passage
677
Notes
681
Prawa autorskie

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Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Informacje o autorze (1996)


Boleslaw Prus was the pseudonym of Alexander Glowacki (1847-1912), an outstanding realist writer and essayist, shaped by his youthful experience of participating in the January Uprisings against Tsarist rule.

Informacje bibliograficzne