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43.

-5. Nummorum; i. e. sestertiorum. See A. & S. § 327; and Dict. Antiqq. 6. Ministeriis. Dative case. 7. Litteralis. The slavedealer cautiously uses the diminutive. The poet admirably takes off throughout the business tact of the man. 12. Meo-in aere, i. e. not alieno in aere, as aes alienum, another's money, means debt; he is poor (indeed) but he is not in debt; hence has no need of forcing his wares upon any one. 13. Temere. Comp. Epist. ii., 1, 120. 15. Pendentis. Doubtless the whip was hung up in the hall or in some public part of the house, to strike terror into the slaves. - - 16. Des, etc. See above at 1. 2. These are now the words of Horace. -17. Poenae, in respect to the penalty (of the law); because he has told you the faults of the slave, and therefore you can recover no. damages. 22. Rediret, in reference to an epistle in reply, for which Florus had waited in vain. -23. Mecum, i. e. in my favor. - 30. Regale, i. e. of king Mithridates. The story is taken from the celebrated campaigns of Lucullus in the Third Mithridatic War, в. c. 74-67. 40. Zonam, the girdle which fastened the toga; in it the purse was kept. Athenae. The personal points touched upon in these lines (44-52) are noticed in the Life of Horace. 44. Curvo-rectum, used in a moral sense; right from wrong. He is speaking of the Academy and of the study of philosophy, not of geometry. 47. Belli, depends upon rudem; comp., on the whole line, O. ii., 7, 9-16; Sat. i., 6, 48. Quae -- cicutae. Hemlock was used as a cooling medicine; expurgare = sanare, heal. Now that I am in fortunate circumstances, I were mad indeed not to enjoy my repose; so mad, that no doses of hemlock, how great soever, could possibly restore me to sanity.. 58-140. For course of thought see Introd. Carmine; i. e. odes, lyric poetry. 60. Bioneis sermonibus; satires. Bion was a philosopher of sarcastic mood, and attached to the sect of the Cynics. - 67. Sponsum -auditum. Supines; on the former comp. Sat. i., 6, 23.- 68. Cubat. See n. Sat. i., 9, 18. 70. Humane. In pleasant allusion to the distance from each other of the Quirinal and Aventine, which were at opposite extremities of the city; delightfully convenient.· Verum, etc.; as if said in objection; but (you will say) &c. 71. Meditantibus. Comp. Sat. i., 9, 2. - -72. Festinat, etc. With this description compare the more extended one of Juvenal, Sat. iii., 227 seqq.. 76. I nunc, etc. Comp. Epist. i., 6, 17. -78. Somno-umbra. So Juvenal, Sat. vii., 105. Sed genus ignavum, quod lecto gaudet et umbra. Contracta-vestigia. The narrow tracks; arta, nondum imitatorum turba protrita." Mitscherlich. 81. Ingenium, etc. "A man of

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talent, who has studied many years in all the advantage of seclusion, often turns out unfit for authorship, and even for society; how much less can I deem myself fit to compose lyric poetry, amid the tumults and conflicts of city life ?"-Osborne, from Orelli. 88. Meros;= "nihil

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to represent a Satyr. So in Ars. P. 232, though the word is not followed by an accusative.-Horace here describes the ease of a good writer, who has the art to conceal the toil and effort which his style has cost him. - 126. Praetulerim, etc. Horace really means to say, that such is his own ideal of what a poet ought to be, that he is always ill at ease, when he tries to write himself. Far better the bliss of the complacent poet, who is ignorant of what constitutes good poetry. The poet's words, together with the story that now follows, well illustrate Gray's familiar words:

"Where ignorance is bliss,
'Tis folly to be wise."

128. Ringi; used properly of dogs, when they snarl and show their teeth. -134. Signo. The seal put upon the flask. 137. Helleboro. See Sat. ii., 3, 82; Ars. P. 300. The ancients ascribed insanity to derangement of the organs that secrete the bile; hence atra bilis, Meλayxoxía, madness. The great remedy was the Hellebore of Anticyra. 141-end. See Introd.-The precepts have reference chiefly to a love of wealth (to 1. 204); then to bad passions in general. 150.

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Fugeres; nolles, or recusares. (Orelli); as in O. i., 9, 13. - 158. Libra-et aere. Purchase of property was accompanied by a form of transfer, called in the Roman law mancipatio; which was effected per aes et libram. The purchaser took hold of the thing (manu capere), and declaring, "I have bought this thing with this piece of money and these brazen scales," he struck the scales with the piece of money, and gave the latter to the seller as a symbol of the price. To the real ownership in property which was thus represented, Horace in this passage pleasantly opposes the quasi ownership which one has from the use of the property, e. g. of the produce of lands, by paying a certain price. See Dict. Antiqq. under Mancipium.· 160. Orbi. The name of the real owner of the land, which, as the poet argues, is yours inasmuch as you live upon it. 166. Numerato-olim; on what was paid lately or some time ago; i. e. by you for the produce you have recently bought, or for the land itself purchased (by the owner) some time ago. 167. Emptor. "Join with quondam ; = is, qui quondam emit." Orelli. -168. Aliter; i. e. that they are not bought, but are his own. - 170. Usque-quae, up to the place where. Populuslimitibus. The poplar planted on the securely fixed boundaries; populus is collective, and the whole expression describes a line of poplars, that makes a boundary about which there can be doubt.- -171. Refugit. The aoristic perfect; see n. O. i., 28, 20; literally, avoids; prevents.— 177. Non—auro. Comp. O. ii., 18, 36. -180. Sigilla; little images, in Tuscan bronze, of the gods; valuable, in the time of Horace, from

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their antiquity.

181. Gaetulo: see n. O. ii., 16, 35. 182. Curat; see n. O. i., 1, 4. 184. Herodis. Herod the Great, who was made king of Judea by Antony, and after the battle of Actium retained his throne, through the favor of Octavianus. Pliny, Hist. N., v. 14, speaks of the rich palm-groves of Jericho, and of the great revenues which they yielded the king. 187. Genius. See n. O. iii., 17, 14. 190. Ex modico. Comp. Sat. i., 1, 51.- 192. Et tamen, etc. The poet means, that he would be sure to preserve a true medium. Here, too, comp. Sat. i., 1, 101 seqq. 197. Quinquatribus. The Quinquatria was a festival, in honor of Minerva, which began on the 19th of March, and continued five days; it was a season of vacation for the schools. 212. Spinis, metaphorical for vitiis. -214. Lusisti, etc. The image in these lines is taken from a feast. The sense is: give up these enjoyments, that are no longer suited to your age. -215. Potum; participle; sc. te. 216. Lasciva-actas; i. e. youth, an age which may with more propriety indulge in sport and gayety.

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