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THE

WORKS

Of the LEARNED

BENJAMIN WHICHCOTE, D.D.

Rector of St. L AWRENCE JEWRY,

LONDON

VOLUME IV.

ABERDEEN:

Printed by J. CHALMERS, for ALEXANDER

THOMSON Bookseller, and sold at his Shop in
the Broadgate.

MDCCLI.

D

C Ο Ν Τ Ε Ν Τ S.

VOL. IV.

DISCOURSE LXXI. LXXII. LXXIII. Wha. foever things are juft.-Phil. iv 8. Finally breth

ren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honeft, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report ; if there be any virtue, if there be any praise, think on these things.

page 1. 20. 36. DISCOURSE LXXIV. Whatsoever things are holy.-- From the same text. p. 54.

DISCOURSE LXXV. Whatsoever things are lovely.-- From the fame text. p. 84.

DISCOURSE LXXVI. Whatsoever things are of good report.--From the same text,

P. 107 DISCOURSE LXXVII. If there be any virtue - From the same text. p. 119:

DISCOURSE LXXVIII. It there be any praise. From the same text. p. 131.

DISCOURSE LXXIX. Think on these things.-From the same text. p. 137.

DISCOURSE LXXX. The importance of forgiveness of fin, and its certainty clamour, and evil speaking, be put away from you, with

to the penitent.--Acts xiii. 38. Be it known unto you therefore, men and brethren, that through this man is preached unto you forgiveness of fin.

p. 155. DISCOURSE LXXXI. The great benefics that accrue to us by our Saviour's

being in our nature. --Acts xiii 23: Of this man's feed hath God, according to his promise, raised unto Ifrael a Saviour, Jesus.

p. 176. DISCOURSE LXXXII. The obligations and advantages of good-will. – Eph. iv. 31, 32. Let all bitterness, and wrath, and anger, and

clamour, p. 362, 373. 394.405. 414. 425.

DISCOURSE LXXI.

Whatsoever things are just.

PHIL. iv. 8.
Whatsoever things are juft.

O

UR English translation is a little too short

for the Greek ; the word in the Greek doth

comprehend two things; that which in our English language we call just, and that which we call equal. Justice and equity, I know often times are indifferently used for the self-fame thing ; but if we speak strictly and exactly, then they are to be distinguished : for whatsoever either reason or law will admit, that may pass for just ; but equity will take all things into consideration, that do accompany the case ; and if the case require it, equity will abate of that which itrict right will afford. Therefore we say that what we call equity, is to moderate strict right : and indeed strict right may be down-right injury and wrong ; but equity is the moderator.

Sometimes you have just, and no cquity on the other side ; and then just is all in all. But just is not right, if there be equity on the other side. For where there is equity in the case, equity rules, and just vails. Strict right is not to be stood upon by persons of reason and conscience, where equity calls Vol. IV.

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