The Works of Horace

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McKay, 1896 - 230
 

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Strona 216 - Caecilius a privilege denied to Virgil and Varius? Why should I be envied, if I have it in my power to acquire a few words, when the language of Cato and Ennius has enriched our native tongue, and produced new names of things. It has been, and ever will be, allowable to coin a word marked with the stamp in present request. As leaves in the woods are changed with the fleeting years; the earliest fall off first: in this manner words perish with old age, and those lately invented flourish and thrive,...
Strona 138 - Now learn what and how great benefits a temperate diet will bring along with it. In the first place, you will enjoy good health...
Strona 67 - I HAVE completed a monument more lasting than brass, and more sublime than the regal elevation of pyramids, which neither the wasting shower, the unavailing north-wind, nor an innumerable succession of years, and the flight of seasons, shall be able to demolish.
Strona 131 - Greeks, and [more correct likewise] than the tribe of our old poets : but yet he, if he had been brought down by the fates to this age of ours, would have retrenched a great deal from his writings : he would have pruned off every thing that transgressed the limits of perfection ; and, in the composition of verses, would often have scratched his head, and bit his nails to the quick. You that intend to write what is worthy to be read more than once, blot frequently: and take no pains to make the multitude...
Strona 219 - What will this boaster produce worthy of all this gaping? The mountains are in labor, a ridiculous mouse will be brought forth. How much more to the purpose he, who attempts nothing improperly? "Sing for me, my muse, the man who, after the time of the destruction of Troy, surveyed the manners and cities of many men.
Strona 216 - A large vase at first was designed: why, as the wheel revolves, turns out a little pitcher? In a word, be your subject what it will, let - it be merely simple and uniform. The great majority of us poets — father, and youths worthy such a father — are misled by the appearance of right.
Strona 230 - Books. Lysias' Select Orations. Plato's Apology, Crito and Phaedo. Plato's Gorgias. Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus, Electra, and Antigone. Xenophon's Anabasis. — Five Books. Xenophon's Memorabilia, complete.
Strona 215 - ... unsightly in an ugly fish below — could you, my friends, refrain from laughter, were you admitted to such a sight? Believe, ye Pisos, the book will be perfectly like such a picture, the ideas of which, like a sick man's dreams, are all vain and fictitious: so that neither head nor foot can correspond to any one form. " Poets and painters [you will say] have ever had equal authority for attempting any thing.
Strona 218 - ... to force of arms. Let Medea be fierce and untractable, Ino an object of pity, Ixion perfidious, lo wandering, Orestes in distress. If you offer to the stage anything unattempted, and venture to form a new character, let it be preserved to the last...
Strona 52 - ... husband, she will come forth, whether it be a factor that calls for her, or the captain of a Spanish ship, the extravagant purchaser of her disgrace. It was not a youth born from parents like these, that stained the sea with Carthaginian gore, and slew Pyrrhus, and mighty Antiochus, and terrific Annibal ; but a manly progeny of rustic soldiers, instructed to turn the glebe with Sabine spades, and to carry clubs cut [out of the woods] at the pleasure of a rigid mother, what time the sun shifted...

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