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New York City Brooklyn Bronx Manhattan Queens Richmond Staten Island Bloomingdale Brothers department store fifty ninth Third Avenue employer employee profit north river borough oatmeal flour Hudson muffin baking powder clothing traffic policeman obedient grocery clerk manager moderate yesterday earth inspection building geography recreation wholesale retail manager

SPELLING LIST

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Broadway
Van Cortlandt
Bowery
subway
party
surface
elevated
parade
recruit
artist
painting
library
circulating
elevator
waist
dyed
complaint
interest
churches
cathedral
kitchen
laundry
grandfather
daughter
newspaper
advertise
important
machine
alphabet
letters
valuable
money
check
deposit
telephone
distant
shopping
aluminum
nickel
Queensboro
bridge
pudding

cocoanut parcel post number credit register gentlemen

ladies lecture jewelry location distributed delivery

PROBLEMS

I. Shoes that were marked $4.98 are reduced to $3.75. If mother buys a pair for John and one for Nelly, (1) how much does she pay? (2) how much does she save? (3) how much change does she get from a $10 bill?

II. Blue silk ribbon 6 inches wide costs 29 cents a yard. If I buy 2 yards for Mary and 11 yards for Jane, how much must I pay? Change from $2?

III. Mother has $5 to spend in groceries and meat for 1 week. Expend it wisely, using grocery circular.

IV. Stock girls earn $8 per week. How much will they earn in 1 year? in 12 weeks?

V. If a stock girl saves $1.50 each week, how much will she have at end of year? VI. Bank in the store gives 4 per cent. interest. If the girl deposits her

4 year's savings, how much will it earn for her the next year? (High grade children.)

VII. Fare across Queensboro bridge is 3 cents—2 for 5 cents. If an employee lives in Long Island City, what will his fare cost for the month of March? April?

VIII. Recipe for popovers (8): 1 cup flour (4 cups to pound), 1 cup milk (4 cups to quart), 2 eggs, teaspoonful salt. 1. Cost to make 16 popovers? 2. Cost to make enough for own family?

IX. If an article costs $29.65 wholesale, and it retails for $34, what is the profit?

X. Goods at wholesale price costs $25 for 50 yards. It retails at $.69 per yard, what is the profit?

XI. Stitched dish towels cost 10 cents a piece. If we buy 10 yards at 8 cents a yard and make 12 towels, how much do we save?

XII. Buy 1 yards of silk at $1.20 per yard. Change from $5?

THE SCHOOLHOUSE FLAG

DANIEL M. HENDERSON

I watch, within the school yard,

The wee folks romp and race;
I hear the alien accent,

I see the alien face;
I think how men of selfsame birth

O’erseas each other slay,
Yet here, in gay comaraderie,

Their children's children play.

I put these to the test: “Whose flag

Streams out from yonder pole?” “It's ours! Old Glory'!” every breed

Gives answer, heart and soul!
And in their swift reply I read

Rebuke to those who'd see
In folk from king's or kaiser's land

Menace to liberty.

These are Tomorrow's men; their lives

We for the Flag engage,
When we teach them its sacred folds

Are common heritage.
All bloods blend in the crimson bars

That through "Old Glory" run,
It calls to men in divers tongues-
They answer it-in one!

-Ladies' Home Journal.

CLASS MANAGEMENT

HOW I DECORATE MY CLASS ROOM

LEO M. HOGAN

PUBLIC SCHOOL 19, MANHATTAN Materials

1. Wash for class room plaster: "Moresco,” 40 cents a box enough for an ordinary size class room, any shade.

. 2. Burlap for walls: get old bags and dye them. Then iron them out. 3. Paint and stain: on the supply list. 4. Picture frames: supply list.

5. Pictures: magazines, calendars which the children bring and from the supply list.

6. Flags: supply list.

My school is a very old building and as the holes in the walls became larger from falling plaster, the boys decided to make the room more attractive. With 5 cents worth of plaster we filled up the holes and painted the walls from the top of the blackboards to the ceiling with white “Moresco," which brightened up the room a great deal as it has a northern exposure and the light is very poor because of high buildings across the street. We dyed the burlap green, ironed it and tacked it on the vacant wall spaces around the room beginning parallel with the bottom of the blackboards and ending at the top.

The boys made flat moulding 2 inches wide out of one half inch basswood, stained it and placed it all around the room covering the space where the burlap and “Moresco" covering meet. All this cost the teacher 45 cents and as the boys wished to pay for it, I allowed them to buy a picture instead. They selected “The Horse Fair” and as it costs $1.59 they pooled their funds and made up the money. To show how much I thought of their very fine class spirit I gave them $1.59 to get another one and they came back with “Aurora,” because one boy said it had a horse in it.

Now that the walls looked fairly well and we had two good pictures, the boys wanted more. I did not want the boys to spend their money as each one has a bank-book which I encourage them to use and save for themselves. So we all hunted around. On the supply list we found mission frames in two sizes with adjustable backs. We got four of these and we change the pictures from time to time.

At the beginning of the war a number of steamship lines discarded their framed advertisements of German vessels. So the boys brought in the glass and frames and we scraped and stained them. I only keep the same pictures as long as the boys like to look at them. This year we are having for a center of interest New York City history and its relationship to the allied countries. Our present pictures and where they came from may help some of th chers.

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“Joan of Arc" (French). Supply list, 1913.
“Columbus at Court of Spain" (Italian). Supply list, 1913.

“Fall of New Amsterdam" (N. Y. City). Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

“Capt. Miles Standish” (English). Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917. “Abraham Lincoln” (American). Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

"Washington and Mother” (American). Ladies' Home Journal, Oct. 1917.

“Making the First Flag" (American). Greenhut's advertise.

Last term's center of interest, Animals and Picture Study of Kindness. The pictures were:

“The Horse Fair.” Gift of class.
“Aurora.” Gift of teacher.
“The Sheep Going Home. Supply list, 1913.
“The Good Shepherd.” Supply list, 1913.
"Madonna." Large calendar.
“Jack and the Beanstalk” (colored). Jessie Wilcox Smith.
“Red Riding Hood” (colored). Jessie Wilcox Smith.
“Goldilocks" (colored). Jessie Wilcox Smith.

. These are all large pictures and when mounted can be placed in the frames, on the supply list. The four pictures from the Ladies' Home Journal are very fine and colored.

We have six small flags (on supply list) which we hang over the pictures representing countries that have contributed to the history of America.

EXCHANGES

Mental Hygiene: Types of Delinquent Careers. Efficiency and In

efficiency. Standardized Fields of Inquiry for Clinical Studies of
Borderline Defectives. Educational Methods and Fundamental
Causes of Dependency. Some Criteria for the Evaluation of Mental
Tests and Test Series. How May We Discover the Children Who Need

Special Care? Feeble-mindedness as Seen in Court. Mental Hygiene: The Broader Psychiatry and the War. The Relation of Psychology to Military Activities. Some of the Nervous

. and Mental Conditions Arising in the Present War. The Effect of High Explosives Upon the Central Nervous System. Neuro-psy

chiatry and the War. The Journal of the N. Y. State Teachers' Association: What English is

Commercial English. A Plea for Individuality. Health Education.
Feeble-minded Delinquents.

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