Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub

lishe the kinos presenteithout any on

clause. (5.) Chap. ii. 42, 43, with chap. vii. 8, 20, after the first clause, verse 24, after the first clause, and verse 25. (6.) Chap. ii. 34, 35, 44, with chap. vii. 11 and 14, first clause, and verse 27, first clause. (7.) Chap. ii. 45, with chap. vii. 9, 10, 13, and 14, last clause, 21, 22, 26, and 27, last clause.

Could you believe, without any other evidence than is presented in these chapters, that the kingdom of God would be established or commenced while any earthly kingdoms were in existence? And yet all commentators and expositors of the Bible refer us, as indeed they ought, to these chapters, for the true idea of the phrase "kingdom of God," as used in the New Testament..

Do the sacred writers of the New Testa'ment represent this kingdom as set up before

Christ's ascension to heaven? See Matt. iii. 2; iv. 17; x. 7; Mark xiv. 25; Luke xiii. 28; xxii. 29; xix. 11–27: xxiii. 42; Acts i. 6. .: Do they represent it as still future in the days of the Apostles? If so, how far future? With Luke xix. 11-27, compare Matt. xxv. -34; Luke xxi. 31; 2 Thess. i. 5; James

ii. 5; Heb. xii. 28; 2 Pet. i. 11; 1 Cor. vi. · 9, 10; Gal. v. 21. ; Eph. v. 55; Matt. xiii.

24—30, 36–43; Rev. xi. 15–18; 1 Cor. **y. 50; 2 Tim. iv. 1. See also and understand 2 Pet. i. 16-18, compared with Matt. xvi. 28 to xvii. 9; and then Rev. xx. 4-6, *and xxi. 2-4.

: The kingdom of God is said, by our Savior, to be like,” or “is likened to," a great variety of things. But in all such cases the phrase is used (by metonymy) for some circumstance or transaction pertaining, or having reference to this kingdom, as yet future; for surely the kingdom itself cannot be, literally, like all the things.

But how shall we understand those passages which seem to teach that the kingdom of God is the reign of grace in the heart? Compare them with those already referred to: especially compare Luke xvii. 21, and Rom. xiv. 17, with Luke xiii. 29; John iii. 3, 5, and Coll. i. 13; and ask yourself how we can enter into, be translated into, and sit down IN, that which is within us. In respect to Luke xvii. 21, see the correct translation given in the margin.

For an illustration of what is represented in the Bible as now going on with reference to the kingdom of God, see 1 Kings vi. 7.

3. Are the Jews, as a distinct people, to be returned to the land of their fathers, before the coming of Christ to raise the dead? And are they now entitled to any peculiar privileges or blessings as a people?

Here notice, particularly, the period during which they were to be rejected and punished, as a nation, as threatened in Deut. xxviii. 15-68; (notice particularly verses 20, 21, 22, 24, 29, 33, 45, 46, 48, 51, 61,) and in 1 Kings ix. 6, 7. Then read 2 Kings xvii.

clause. (5.) Chap. ii. 42, 43, with chap. vii. 8, 20, after the first clause, verse 24, after the first clause, and verse 25. (6.) Chap. ii. 34, 35, 44, with chap. vii. 11 and 14, first clause, and verse 27, first clause. (7.) Chap. ii. 45, with chap. vii. 9, 10, 13, and 14, last clause, 21, 22, 26, and 27, last clause.

Could you believe, without any other evidence than is presented in these chapters, that the kingdom of God would be established or commenced while any earthly kingdoms were in existence? And yet all commentators and expositors of the Bible refer us, as indeed they ought, to these chapters, for the true idea of the phrase “ kingdom of God," as used in the New Testament..

Do the sacred writers of the New Testa'ment represent this kingdom as set up before

Christ's ascension to heaven? See Matt. iii. : 2; iv. 17; x. 7; Mark xiv. 25; Luke xiii. 28; xxii. 29; xix. 11—27: xxiii. 42; Acts i. 6. - Do they represent it as still future in the days of the Apostles? If so, how far future? With Luke xix. 11—27, compare Matt. xxv. -34; Luke xxi. 31; 2 Thess. i. 5; James ii. 5; Heb. xii. 28; 2 Pet. i. 11; 1 Cor. vi. 9, 10; Gal. v. 21; Eph. v. 55; Matt. xiii. 24—30, 36—43; Rev. xi. 15—18; 1 Cor. 'xv. 50; 2 Tim. iv. 1. See also and under

stand 2 Pet. i. 16—18, compared with Matt. * xvi. 28 to xvii. 9; and then Rev. xx. 4—6, fand xxi. 24.

: The kingdom of God is said, by our Savior,

to be "like," or "is likened to," a great variety of things. But in all such cases the phrase is used (by metonymy) for some circumstance or transaction pertaining, or having reference to this kingdom, as yet future; for surely the kingdom itself cannot be, literally, like all the things.

But how shall we understand those passages which seem to teach that the kingdom of God is the reign of grace in the heart? Compare them with those already referred to: especially compare Luke xvii. 21, and Rom. xiv. 17, with Luke xiii. 29; John iii. 3, 5, and Coll. i. 13; and ask yourself how we can enter into, be translated into, and sit down in, that which is within us. In respect to Luke xvii. 21, see the correct translation given in the margin.

For an illustration of what is represented in the Bible as now going on with reference to the kingdom of God, see 1 Kings vi. 7.

3. Are the Jews, as a distinct people, to be returned to the land of their fathers, before the coming of Christ to raise the dead? And are they now entitled to any peculiar privileges or blessings as a people?

Here notice, particularly, the period during which they were to be rejected and punished, as a nation, as threatened in Deut. xxviii. 15—68; (notice particularly verses 20, 21, 22, 24, 29, 33, 45, 46, 48, 51, 61,) and in 1 Kings ix. 6,7. Then read 2 Kings xvii. 1—23, and notice at the top of the page, B. C. 742. So much for the tribes of Israel.

Respecting the tribe of Judah, see Isa. vi. 8—12; Jer. ix. 16; Jer. xxv. 8—23, noticing particularly verses 9, 12, 18, 27; 2 Chron. xxxiii. 9—11, noticing, at the top of the page, B. C. 677, just 65 years from the beginning of the reign of Ahaz, as predicted in Isa. vii. 8. Since that period the Jews have never been an independent people, (see Neh. ix. 32--37,) although kings of the house of David, continued to reign on David's throne in Jerusalem, as tributaries to Assyria and Babylon, until the captivity of Zedekiah, king of Judah, as predicted in Ezek. xxi. 25—27, and recorded, as history, in 2 Kings xxiv. 18--20; xxv. 1--10.

Compare Luke xxi. 24, and Rom. xi. 25, with Dan. ix. 26, 27, last clause, and viii. 14.

But how shall such predictions and promises be understood as are found in Isa. xi. 11, 12; Ezek. xxxvi. 24, 28; xxxvii. 21, 22; Rom. xi. 26 ? See who are the true Israel on p. 22. Then compare Isa. lxv. 17—19, with Rev. xxi. 1—4, and 2 Pet. xi. 13. See also Dan. vii. 18, 27, and Ezek. xxxvii.

4. Is there to be a millennium, i. e., a thousand years of universal holiness, on earth, before Christ comes to close up the scene of this world's probation? Is there a single passage in the New Testament which clearly teaches it? If so, find it. Do you refer to the 20th

« PoprzedniaDalej »