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Her robes are strength and honour. Future days
Shall roll in blessings, and extend her praise.
Her op'ning lips divineft wisdom fills,
And kindness thence, like ey'ning-dews, diftils;
Her house with wife economy the guides,
And eats the bread which her own toil provides,
Her children, form’d to virtue by her care,
Bless her instructions, and her worth declare:
Her husband too her high deferts will tell,
And on the pleasing subject loves to dwell.
How many daughters, deck'd with virtue's rays,
Have'fhone their sex's dignity and praise ?
But thou art Virtue's self; their feebler light
Transcending, as the moon the train of night.
Favour how false, and fickle is its breath!
And beauty foon must be destroy'd by death ;
But the, who fears the LORD, and treads his ways,
Inherits an eternity of praise.
The honours the deserves let all proclaim,
In life and death let blessings crown her name,
Sacred to virtue, and to endless fame.

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$ 5. The use of the Hypotyposis is very

evident, since it enables us rather to see a person or thing, than only to hear a report about them; and a lively and perfect picture of a person or fact is admirably adapted to engage and impress the minds of our hearers, and seize and command their pafsions.

“ Our pity, says QUINTILIAN, for cities taken «

by the enemy is increased by description. Un“ doubtedly the person who acquaints us that a “ city.is facked, comprehends all the variety of

64 fortune

« fortune which attends such a tragical event ; s but this short piece of intelligence slightly s touches the passions, But if you should open s all that is included in this single expression of ” a city's being sacked, the flames would appear

spreading themselves through the houses and “ temples, you would hear the crash of falling << edifices, and the commingled din of different “ noises. Some would be seen flying they knew “ not whither, and others clasping round their « relations in the last embraces. You would “ hear the cries of women and children, and be “ shocked to see poor old men, that have unhap“. pily lingered out a life that must be closed in “ such a tremendous fate. Here you would beç hold the plunder of whatever was valuable, « whether facred or profane. Some are running “ off with the spoil; others, in different quar* ters of the city, are returning to it. Here “ the captives bound in chains are driven before

their tyrants : the mother struggles hard to “ keep her grasp of her infant; and the very

conquerors themselves, where they find an ex"traordinary booty, are fighting for their shares. “ Though the facking of a city, as I have ob" seryed, comprehends all these horrors, yet “ how different is the mention of the thing in “ general, to the distinct and particular repre* fentation of such a direful catastrophe *?"

§ 6,

Disain
Sic urbium captatum crefeit miferatio. Sine dubio

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enim

§. 6. It may not be unserviceable to give some directions concerning the Hypotyposis. As,

(1) Let our descriptions be exact and faithful copies from natựre. Dr Young, in one of his notes upon his Paraphrase on Part of the Book of Job, observes, that " our judicious and sublime “ Author just touches the great points of dif“ tinction in each creature (the peacock, ostrich, « &c.) and then haftens to another. A descrip« tion is exact, when you cannot add but what is “ common to another thing, nor withdraw but

fomething peculiarly belonging to the thing * described. A likeness is loft in too niuch de“ fcription, as a meaning often in too much il

lustration."

(2) Let us know when we have said enough, and avoid tautology, If we aim to make a description large, let us beware that we do

not

enim qui dicit expugnatam esse civitatem, complectitur om. nia quæcunque talis fortuna recipit, fed in affectus minus pe. petrat brevis hic velut nuntius. At fi aperias hæc quæ

verbo uno inclusa erant, apparebunt effufæ per domos ac templa flammæ, & ruentium tectorum fragor, & ex diversis clamoribus unus quidam fonus, aliorumque incerta fuga : alii in ex. tremo complexu suorum cohærentes, & infantium feminarum. que ploratus, & male usque in illum diem servati fato fenes : tum illa profanorum facrorumque direptio, efferentium prædas repetentiumque discursus, & a&ti ante suum quisque prædonem

atenati, & conata retinere infantem suum mater, & ficubi ma. jus lucrum eft, pugna inter vietores. Licet enim hæc omnia (ut dixi) comple&tatur eversio, minus eft tamen totum dicere, quam omnia. QUINTIL, lib. vii. cap. 3. $ 5

not fall into a fazernet of Freed
will mar the beauties or the
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$ 6. It may not be unserviceable to give some directions concerning the Hypotyposis. As,

(1) Let our descriptions be exact and faithful copies from nature, Dr Young, in one of his notes upon his Paraphrase on Pert of the Book of Job, obferves, that " our judicious and sublime “ Author juft touches the great points of dif“ tinction in each creatyre (the peacock, ostrich, « &c.) and then haftens to another. A descrip« tion is exact, when you cannot add but what is « common to another thing, nor withdraw but

fomething peculiarly belonging to the thing 26 described. A likeness is loft in too niuch de

fcription, as a meaning often in too much il* lustration."

(2) Let us know when we have said enough, and avoid tautology. If we aim to make a description large, let us beware that we do

not

enim qui dicit expugnatam esse civitatem, complectitur om. nia quæcunque talis fortuna recipit, sed in affectus minus pepetrat brevis hic velut nuntius. At fi aperias hæc quæ verbo uno inclusa erant, apparebunt effufæ per domos ac templa flammæ, & ruentium tectorum fragor, & ex diverfis clamori. bus unus quidam fonus, aliorumque incerta fuga : alii in ex. tremo complexu suorum cohærentes, & infantium feminarumque ploratus, & male usque in illum diem feryati fato fenes : tum illa profanorum facrorumque direptio, efferentium prædas repetentiumque discursus, & a&i ante suum quisque prædonem catenati, & conata retinere infantem suum mater, & ficubi ma. jus lucrum est, pugna inter vi&tores. Licet enim hæc omnią (ut dixi) complectatur everfio, minus eft tamen totum dicere, quam omnia. QUINTIL, lib. viii. cap. 3. $5.

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