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gures vanish; but let never so much alteration be made as to the words in Figures of sentiment, the Figures will still continue; for as the Figures reft upon the ideas, it is impossible that they fhould be detroyed by a mutation of language *. The first class of Figures is only the body, the last is the very soul of our compositions to

$ 4. As to the necessity and use of Figures, I shall only for the present transiently observe, that they are of great férvice tồ animate, adorn, entertain, and illustrate. It is of great importance, says " the ingenious Mr Rollin, to make youth ob« serve, in reading good Authors, the use which “ true eloquence makes of Figures, and the as« sistance it draws from them, not only to please,

but to persuade, and move the affections ; “ and that without them expression is weak, and « falls into a kind of monotony, and is almost « like a body without a soul 8.” QUINTILIAN gives a very just idea of the power of Figures by a very natural comparison; “The Statuary's art, says he, is very little feen in an upright body,

" when Formantur autem & verba & sententiæ pæne innumerabiles, quod fatis fcio notum effe vobis; fed inter conformationem verborum & sententiarum hoc intereft, quod verborum tollitur, fi verba mutaris ; , sententiarum permanet, quibuscun.

Cicer, de Orat. lib. iii. p. 52. + Sunt igitur Schemata seu Figuræ duplicis generis, ut : plerisque ftatuuntur, di&tionis, & fententiæ. lllæ ad mate riam, ac veluti corpus orationio pertinent; hæ vero ad formam & quafi animam, hoc eft, ad fententiam. Glass Philolog. Sacra, P. 14225

| ROLLIN on the Belles Lettres, vol. ii. p. 141.

que verbis uti velis

§ 2. A Figure essentially differs from a Trope, as in a Figure there is no translation of a word from its proper into an improper sense; and it is distinguishable from ordinary language, as it cafts a new form úponi speech, and by that mean ennobles and adorns our discourses to

$ 3. Figures are divided into two kinds. Figures of languageand Figures of Fentiment * Figures of language are such fort of Figures as only regard our words which are repeated in some new and uncommon order, or with elegance and beauty fall into an harmony of sound. Figures of sentiment are such as consist not only in words, but ideas, and by these means infuse a strength and vigour into our discourses. The real difference between Figures of language and Figures of sentiment plainly appears from hence, that if in Figures of language you alter the order of the words, or make a change in them, the Fi

gures " the word

to fych forms of speech, as differ from the more common and ordinary ways of expression, as the theatrical habits of actors, and their deportment on the stage, are dif

ferent from their usual garb and behaviour at other times." ; Ward's Oratory, vol.ii. p.33, 34.

: + Figura, ficat nomine ipfo patet, est conformatio quædam orationis remota à communi & primùm fe offerente ratione. Quare in Tropis ponuntur verba alia pro aliis. Horum nihil, in Figuris cadit. Nam & propriis verbis & ordine collocatis, fieri .Figura potest. Quintit. lib. ix. cap. 1. $1.

* Duæ funt ejus partes; diavoles, id eft, fententiarum ; 8+ : ničews, id est, verborum. Quare ficut omnem orationem ita 2 Figuras quoque verlari neceffe eft in sensu & in verbis : QUINTIL, lib. ix. cap. 1. § 2.

gures vanish; but let never so much alteration be made as to the words in Figures of sentiment, the Figures will still continue; for as 'the Figures reft upon the ideas, it is impossible that they fhould be destroyed by a mutation of language *. The first class of Figures is only the body, the last is the very soul of our compositions to

94. As to the necessity and use of Figures, I Mall only for the present transiently observe, that they are of great service to animate, adorn, entertain, and illustrate. · It is of great importance, says “ the ingenious Mr Rollin, to make youth ob“ serve, in reading good Authors, the use which “ true eloquence makes of Figures, and the as« sistance it draws from them, not only to please, « but to persuade, and move the affections ; “ and that without them expression is weak, and “ falls into a kind of monotony, and is almost “ like a body without a soul I." QUINTILIAN gives a very just idea of the power of Figures by a very natural comparison ; “The Statuary's art, says he, is very little seen in an upright body,

u when Formantur autem & verba & sententiæ pæne innumerabiles, quod fatis fcio notum esse vobis; fed inter conformationem verborum & fententiarum hoc intereft, quod verborum tollitur, fi verba mutaris ; fententiarum permanet, quibuscon. que

verbis uti velis Cicer. de Orat. lib. iii. p. 52. + Sunt igitur Schemata feu Figuræ duplicis generis, ut plerisque ftatuuntur, di&tionis, & fententiæ. Næ ad mate. riam, ac veluti corpus orationio pertinent; hæ vero ad formam & quafi animam, hoc eft, ad sententiam. Glass Philalog. Sacra, p. 1422

I ROLLIN on the Belles Lettres, vol. ii. p: 141.

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