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“ The Charlotte, at Spithead, June 16. 1794. “ Sir, - 1 have received your letter of the 12th inst. by which I am informed of your late proceeding with, and arrival of the squadron under your command, that morning, in Plymouth Sound. And I am to signify, in consequence of your application to the same effect, that you are at liberty to strike your flag, and go on shore for the re-establishment of your health, which I sincerely hope you will be able thereby speedily and permanently to obtain. Having the honour, to be, &c. &c.

(Signed)

" Howe.Rear-Admiral Montagu.

(Private.)

“ The Charlotte, Spithead, June 16. 1794. « Sir, — I condole with you most sincerely, on the great loss you

and your family have sustained in consequence of the late action. Your respectable brother was stationed too far distant from me, for my being enabled to give the personal testimony you do me the honour to be anxious for obtaining of me; and which is totally unnecessary for confirming the respect you will naturally retain of him.*

66 The permission of striking your flag for the reasons you

* Captain James Montagu commanded the Montagu, of 74 guns, and was the only officer of his rank who fell on the glorious 1st of June, 1794. At the moment when slain, gh 45' A. M. he was closely engaged with a three-decker and her second ahead, which was the fifth ship from the enemy's rear. The following is a copy of the remarks made by his first lieutenant, the present RearAdmiral Donnelly, at the end of the minutes of the battle, taken on board the Montagu, and transmitted by that excellent officer to Earl Howe:

“ We suffered early an irreparable loss by the death of Captain Montagu, whose coolness and determined bravery while in action did honour to his king, country, and friends; and while I deplore his sad, though honourable fall, I cannot sufficiently testify the gratitude I feel for the support given me during the action, and in our preparation afterwards to renew it, by each officer respectively, and the crew of the ship which I had the honour to command, whose promptitude to do their duty left me no room to doubt of the glorious victory which followed by the judicious manner in which the fleet was conducted, together with the gallantry of its officers and men,

(Signed) • Ross Donnelly,

« First Lieutenant."

have communicated to the Admiralty, is signified in my
official letter the earlier, as I received authority to that effect
from the Board yesterday; and so much time was saved of
course, as would otherwise have been necessary for obtaining
such approbation of your request. And I earnestly hope, for
PUBLIC as well as personal considerations, that the suspension
from your professional avocations will speedily contribute to
the re-establishment of your health. Having the honour to
be, Sir,

“ Your most obedient humble Servant,
(Signed)

66 Howe.” “ Rear-Admiral Montagu."

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From this period, with the exception of his being promoted to the rank of Vice-Admiral, on the 1st of June, 1795, we find no farther mention of our officer till the month of March, 1799, when Lord Spencer, then at the head of naval affairs, offered him the command at the Nore, which he declined, thinking it beneath his rank. In the following year, the Earl of St. Vincent applied for him to be attached to the Channel fleet; but, unfortunately, before his application reached the Admiralty, the appointment was given to another officer; and although the gallant Nelson, with whom he was not then personally acquainted, proposed him as his successor in the Baltic *, his flag was not again hoisted till the summer of 1803. During the ensuing five years and a half, a period of active war, he held the chief command at Portsmouth, and executed the arduous duties of his office to the full and entire satisfaction of six different Boards of Admiralty. Whilst there, his late Majesty (then Prince of Wales) honoured that town, a second time, with his presence. Previous to the departure of this illustrious visiter, he dined with the Admiral, who afterwards received the following highly flattering letter:

See Clarke and M‘Arthur's Life of Lord Nelson, 4to edit, vol. ii. p. 286.

“ Portsmouth, Sept. 14. 1803. " Sir, I am commanded by the Prince of Wales, to express the high satisfaction H. R. H. experienced in his visit to the fleet yesterday. The great skill and undaunted courage which has been so brilliantly displayed by the officers and men in all quarters of the world, render any remark from H. R. H. superfluous, but which alone has been produced by the state of discipline and subordination so justly the admiration of all Europe. The Prince of Wales further commands me to say how sensible H. R. H. is of your and Admiral Holloway's attention, as well as the Captains of the fleet.

“ I have the honour to be, Sir,
« Your most faithful and obedient Servant,
(Signed)

« B. BLOOMFIELD." 66 Admiral Montagu,

&c. &c. &c."

In August, 1810, a large body of Captains, who had fitted out at that port, whilst he commanded there, presented Admiral Montagu with a superb piece of plate, as “A Tribute of their Respect and Esteem.”

Our officer was advanced to the rank of full Admiral, Jan. 1. 1801; and nominated a G. C. B. as a testimony of the Prince Regent's approbation of his services, Jan. 2. 1815. He subsequently published a pamphlet, dedicated to his Majesty, and entitled, “A Refutation of the incorrect

ents and unjust Insinuations contained in Captain Brenton's Naval History of Great Britain, as far as the same refers to the Conduct of Admiral Sir George Montagu; in a Letter addressed to the Author."

A perusal of the foregoing Memoir, which is confined to a plain statement of well authenticated facts, will prove to the world, that no demerit, much less disgrace, is to be attached to Sir George Montagu's professional character. To use the words of a former biographer, “it has ever been free from

stain: and his actions, like himself, ever generous, brave, and praiseworthy."

At the time of Sir George Montagu's death, which took place at his seat, Stowell Lodge, Wiltshire, on the 24th of December, 1829, he stood second on the list of flag officers, and had been sixty-six years in the naval service.

Sir George Montagu married, Oct. 9. 1783, his cousin, Charlotte, daughter and co-heiress of George Wroughton, of Wilcot, in Wiltshire, Esq.; and by that lady, who survives him, had four sons and five daughters. 1. Georgiana, married, Aug. 15. 1808, to the present Vice-Admiral, Sir John Gore, K. C. B.; 2. Charlotte, died in 1812 ; 3. Lieutenant-Colonel George Wroughton, who has assumed the surname of Wroughton; 4. John-William, Captain R. N.; 5. James, Captain R. N.; 6. Sophia; 7. the Rev. Edward, died at Bishopstrow, Wilts, Dec. 22. 1820; 8. Susanna, deceased; and, 9. Anne, who died in 1807.

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We have derived the foregoing Memoir from “ Marshall's Royal Naval Biography.”

59

No. IV.

HIS MAJESTY, GEORGE IV.

OF THE UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND

KING, DEFENDER OF THE FAITH, PRINCE OF WALES, DUKE OF LANCASTER AND CORNWALL, DUKE OF ROTHSAY IN SCOTLAND, KING OF HANOVER, DUKE AND PRINCE OF BRUNSWICKLUNENBURG, ARCH-TREASURER OF THE HOLY ROMAN EMPIRE, SOVEREIGN PROTECTOR OF THE UNITED STATES OF THE IONIAN ISLANDS, VISCOUNT LAUNCESTON, EARL OF CARRICK IN IRELAND, BARON OF RENFREW, LORD OF THE ISLES, AND GREAT STEWARD OF SCOTLAND, EARL OF CHESTER, CAPTAINGENERAL OF THE HONOURABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY, MARQUIS OF THE ISLE OF ELY, COLONEL-IN-CHIEF OF THE TWO REGIMENTS OF LIFE-GUARDS, HIGH STEWARD OF PLYMOUTH, SOVEREIGN OF THE ORDERS OF THE GARTER, BATH, THISTLE, ST. PATRICK, HANOVERIAN GUELPHIC ORDER, ST. MICHAEL AND ST. GEORGE OF THE IONIAN ISLES, VISITER OF UNIVERSITY, ORIEL, AND CHRIST CHURCH COLLEGES, OXFORD, AND OF TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE, KNIGHT OF THE ORDERS OF THE GOLDEN FLEECE OF SPAIN AND AUSTRIA, OF ST. STEPHEN OF HUNGARY, OF PEDRO OF THE BRAZILS, OF ST. ESPRIT OF FRANCE, OF MARIA THERESA OF AUSTRIA, OF CHARLES III. OF SPAIN, OF ST. ANNE, ALEXANDER NEWSKI, AND THE BLACK EAGLE, OF RUSSIA, OF WILLIAM OF THE NETHERLANDS, OF ST. HUBERT OF BAVARIA, OF GUSTAVUS VASA OF SWEDEN, ETC., D.C.L., F. R. S., AND F.S. A.

The splendid achievements and important occurrences of the late reign will be the inspiring theme of the future historian; and the most brief and simple recital of them will fill many volumes. The nature of our work of course compels us to be content with exhibiting a sketch of his Majesty's personal

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