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son's remark on the subject-Patient of Dr. Kirkbride

in the Pennsylvania Hospital-Four cases of mental dis-

order within the sphere of the author's pastoral expe-

rience—The mistake of imputing to Satanic agency what

is dependent on bodily disease-Case of the wife of

Rev. John Newton-Case of John Bunyan-of Martin

Luther-Opinion of Richard Baxter-Injurious influ-

ence on the mind ascribed to Calvinism—Opinion of a

writer in the Encyclopedia Britannica—of Esquirol —

Macaulay_Haley's insinuation in relation to Cowper

unwarranted -Judicious remark of Dr. Cheyne—Case of

an injured wife in London. Pages 112-131.

USE FOR CONSOLATION—Doctrine of physical influences

liable to be perverted-It suggests many questions not

to be solved by referring them to conscience—Case of a

young man preparing for the ministry Of others who

had made whimsical vows-How far the exercises of

Christians in their morbid states are moral, a very per-

plexing question-Moral qualities hereditary-Opinion

of Dr. Rush-An innate tendency to evil not an apology

for yielding to the inclination-How the doctrine is a

source of relief—Exclamations of a soul in giving vent

to its spiritual anguish-Case of a clergyman in New

England-Gloominess consistent with a regenerate state-

An opinion from the highest medical authority-Obser-

vation of Mr. Pearson in his life of Mr. Hay—The

Saviour's declaration-Payson's Biography-Private dia-

ries of Christians-Error in publishing Cowper's during

the period of his gloomy aberration—The doctrine of

physical influences not to be used as an excuse for wilful

delinquency—If rightly considered, may minister relief

and make us watchful—Extract from Mason's Spiritual

Treasury. Pages 131–143.

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opinion-Rev. Daniel Baker's case. Pages 145—151.

TEMPTED TO ADOPT A FALSE STANDARD OF DUTY, AND

AMBIGUOUS EVIDENCES OF A REGENERATE STATE-

Like the Jews, they look for “signs”—Many distressed

or misled by the sudden occurrence to their mind of an

“alarming text of Scripture”—Case of Mr. Lackington-

Others tempted to trust in “dreams”—The character of

our dreams depends much on our physical condition-

Case of Baron Trenck—of Condorcet—Coleridge—Presi-

dent Edwards—Not denied that God may reveal Himself

through supernatural dreams—Case of a young lady in

England-Cases mentioned by Dr. Abercrombie-Shak-

speare's theory-Queen Mab. Pages 151–159.

CHRISTIANS OF A NERVOUS TEMPERAMENT MAKE TOO

MUCH OF RELIGIOUS FRAMES—Mr. Brownlow North-

Case of a female mentioned by him—Example of Mrs.

Hawkes-Rev. J. Newton's remark—Letter of Rev.

Mr. Cecil. Pages 159-163.

Indulging in melancholy meditation does no good-Dr.

Chalmers' letter to Mr. Anderson. Pages 163–167.

TEMPTATION TO “MAKE AN IDOL OF COMFORT”-Obser-

vations of Dr. Harris-Many mistake an abatement of

comfort for its removal-Christians often make the same

mistake as did the sons of Zebedee-Extract from Wil-

liam Mason. Pages 167–170.

TEMPTATION TO DESPAIR—The climax of morbid spiritual

disquiet-in most cases evidently the result of bodily
disease-Apt to be promoted and nurtured by perverted
views of truth—Some morbid Christians afraid to pray-
Others fear that they have eaten and drunk damnation
to themselves—Case of an interesting female-Distress
caused by endeavouring to harmonize the decrees of God
and his foreknowledge with free agency-Such cases
closely analogous to the temptations of those who imagine
themselves guilty of the unpardonable sin-Persons ex-
posed to this temptation are apt to neglect the means of
grace—Despair never made a human being better-Re-
markable case mentioned by Rev. Mr. Spencer. Pages
170—177.

186.

THE DESPONDING SHOULD AVAIL THEMSELVES OF JUDI-

CIOUS MEDICAL ADVICE—Case of Dr. Rush-Baxter's
counsel—What a well instructed physician can do-
Every physician not competent to treat the cases of the
desponding-Physicians often betray a culpable igno-
rance of the reciprocating relationship between body and
mind-Book of the heart-Sentiments of an eminent
lecturer in a medical school-Advice of Mr. Rogers-
Change in the character of diseases in later years-
Nervous diseases the most numerous-Sydenham's esti-
mate of fevers at the close of the seventeenth century;
Dr. Cheyne's of nervous disorders; Dr. Trotter's
Deaths in England during 1856—No opinion expressed
as to the accuracy of these computations—They show
that the subject of nervous disorders importunately de-
mands the attention of physicians-A morbid mental
state often removed by a drug-Case of a lady in Phila-

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delphia-Another mentioned by Rev. M. B. Hope, M.D.

- The poet Dryden-Descartes-Plutarch's saying, Not

tamper with drugs-Case of Rousseau. Pages 186-200.

THE DESPONDING SHOULD SEEK SUITABLE SOCIETY-Re-

mark of Mr. Locke—Story of Cæsar—Proverb of Solo-

mon-Often good to compare exercises - Hard to dis-

abuse the mind of the desponding of their erroneous

opinions concerning their state - Remark of Mr. Rogers-

Mr. Robert Bruce, of Edinburgh, relieved after having

been twenty years in terror of conscience-Such sufferers

do not receive sufficient sympathy-Captain Benjamin

Wickes, of Philadelphia, and Rev. Joseph Eastburn-

Cowper and the Unwins-One of four cardinal rules-

Company of cheerful Christians recommended to the

melancholy-Avoid that of the gloomy-Dr. Hufeland's

opinion-Counsel of Dr. Everard Maynwaring in his

Tutela Sanitatis—Advice of Seneca—Teachings of St.

Paul - Compare our state with that of others in a condi-

tion far less desirable – Two cases mentioned by Dr.

Hall-A lady helpless by palsy-Archdeacon Paley on

the goodness of God-Digestion aided by laughter -

Solomon on cheerfulness. Pages 200—211.

THOSE WHO WOULD ENJOY SPIRITUAL COMFORT SHOULD

BE TEMPERATE-Dr. Johnson's opinion of water-Hip-
pocrates—Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy-Dr. Rush
on the effect of diet on the moral faculties–Dr. Paris
on animal food – Dr. McNish, of Glasgow—The effect of
living solely on beef-Hon. C. A. Murray-Dr. Arbuth-
not on vegetable regimen - Payson's excessive absti-
nence-Nervous disease caused by excess-Dr. Combe's
opinion-An eminent physician of London on the effects
of the luxurious habits of the people-Persons subject

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