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Males. Females. Total.

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Discharged during the year, Recovered,

21 15 36 Improved,

6 10 16 Not improved,

7 11 18 Died,

4 2 6 Total discharged,

38 38 76 Remaining in the Hospital, 31st of Dec. 1842, . . 47 18 65 Greatest number of patients at any one time,

73 Smallest number,

50 Average number last six months

67 The superintendent's report contains much valuable information on statistics of Lunatic Asylums, causes of insanity, &c.

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NEW HAMPSHIRE ASYLUM FOR THE INSANE.

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This new Asylum has been finished and occupied during the last year. Dr. Chandler has been appointed superintendent, and has entered upon the duties of his appointment. The prospects of the institution equal the expectations of its most sanguine friends.

We have received a brief synopsis from our obliging correspondent, Charles J. Fox, Esq., one of the trustees, of the First Report, just submitted. The Hospital was opened for the reception of patients, October 28, 1842.

Number of admissions — males, 39; females, 37; total, 76 Recent cases -males, 20; females, 18;.

total, 38 Old cases — males, 19; females, 19;.

total, 38 Number remaining, May 31, 1843 — males, 27; females, 20;

47 Discharged — males, 12; females, 17;

total, 29 Recovered — males, 6; females, 6;

total, 12 Improved — males, 5; females, 5;.

total, 10 Not improved — males, 1 ; females, 5;

total, 6 Died,

total, 1 Sent by friends, 53; by towns, 22; by a county, 1. Those by towns and county were pauper patients.

" The Hospital,” says Mr. Fox, “ has been more fortunate than we anticipated. Dr. Chandler is a most excellent man, and, under his judicious conduct, the institution is rapidly becoming popular."

It is delightful to see this good beginning in New Hampshire.

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ASYLUM IN VERMONT.

This institution has gone on, during the last year, with steady progress, in improving its buildings and grounds; securing more and more the confidence of the state where it is located, as well as the confidence of many in other states; and accomplishing its object at a very moderate expense. Dr. Rockwell is a very discreet, practical, experienced, and successful superintendent; the location, buildings, and grounds, are very good; and the mountain air and scenery do much for the restoration of patients. The legislature appreciates the institution, and makes the necessary appropriations for its enlargement.

The Sixth Report, in October last, says, since the last annual report, the new wing has been completed. During six years, 424 insane persons have been received, 311 discharged, 179 restored to reason; 113 remain in the institution, many of whom now partake of the comforts of life, who have been confined in cages and chains. During the last year, 101 have been received, 83 discharged, 49 recovered. No serious accident has ever happened to patient or attendant. There has been no case of suicide. The mortality has been a little less than 5 per cent. A most benevolent provision was made by the legislature of 1842, for persons in the state suffering the double afliction of poverty and insanity. The trustees believe it will be adequate to give a fair trial to every recent case that may be offered for admission. They regret that the law was not so framed that application could be immediately made for every recent case, instead of its being necessary to wait, as the case may be, from February or March, nearly a year before the application can be made. The superintendent's report shows that the expenses of the establishment have been $12,615 54; the income from board of patients, $12,935 36. The patients have come from eleven states and territories, and one of the West India Islands. The terms of admission are, for indigent patients of Vermont, $2 00 per week, or $100 a year; for all others, $2 50 per week for the first six months; after that time, $2 00 per week. No charge is made for damages in any case. The means of cure in this institution are abundant, and well adapted to the end. Its whole history is one of success, with as little variation as can be found in almost any thing human.

MCLEAN ASYLUM AT CHARLESTOWN.

A quarter of a century has now elapsed since this institution went into operation. The number of patients, which was from 40 to 60 in 1818 and 19, varies from 130 to 150 in 1841 and 42. The number received annually has changed, in the same time, from 30 and 40 to 130 and 140; the whole number receiving its benefits annually, from 50 and 60 to 270 and 280; the recoveries, from 10 and 11 annually to 75 and 80. tabular view, touching all these points, and others scarcely less important, is presented in the last report of the superintendent, going to show the steady progress of this noble charity, with scarcely the shadow of variation, from its commencement to the present time. And although institutions have been opened in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont, within a few years, of a similar character, besides the Hospitals at South Boston and Worcester, Mass., the Asylum at Charlestown had 133 patients at the close of the last year -- a greater number than at the close of any previous year, except one, since its commencement.

The accommodations furnished at Charlestown are such as can only be furnished by an immense outlay of funds.

The whole cost of the land and buildings at the McLean Asylum amounts to $245,845 98. The executors of Mr. McLean and Miss Belknap paid from the estates of these great benefactors from 90 to $100,000 each. The invested capital of the institution is debited on the books of the treasurer at $110,056 72, not including the grounds and buildings. The income is derived from the following sources;

- the annual profits of its invested capital ; a right to one third of the yearly profits of the Hospital Life Insurance Company; the board of its patients; and annual subscriptions for free beds at the Hospital

Receipts last year: Profits from invested capital,

6,727 78 Profits of the Hospital Life Insurance Company, 5,000 00 Ten annual subscribers,

1,400 00 Total,

$13,127 78

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Received for board of patients at the Hospital,
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at the Asylum, . Receipts exceed expenses, .

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The trustees express the hope that, in future years, the Asylum will be able to defray its expenses; but they do not suppose

it will be able to do much more than that. In regard to its management, the trustees say, “that, in general health and peace, in freedom from every painful accident, and in its curative results, the year now completed will compare favorably with any former period.”

The average number of patients has been 132; the number under treatment, 271; received during the year, 129; discharged, 138; remaining in the house, 133; — recovered, 80; much improved, 8; improved, 12; not improved, 20; died, 15. The number of entire recoveries is larger than that of any previous year.

The committee commend Dr. Bell for his bold and discriminating views in regard to the statistics of Insane Asylums. They notice the lamented death of the chairman of their board, George Bond, Esq. "A man of sterling integrity, sound judgment, and generous impulses, his memory is entitled to the respect of all who honor virtue, or love practical benevolence."

Dr. Bell, in his report, cherishes the memory of Dr. Rufus Wyman, the first superintendent of the McLean Asylum, as a great public benefactor. He says, “What is due to his memory can never be realized or appreciated, except by the small number whose opportunities and duties enable them to judge of the difficulties he encountered and the means he projected to meet them."

Dr. Bell also pays a well-deserved tribute to the memory of Dr. Lee, the second head of the institution, “who was removed from the most brilliant prospects of success, and the affectionate esteem of all who knew him, in October, 1836." Under Dr. Wyman's care, 1152 patients were received; Under Dr. Lee's care,

150 do. do. do. And under Dr. Bell's,

841 do. do. do. Making a total of .

2142 The extent of the operations of the institution during its entire existence, may be seen in the following table :

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58

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47
64
73
53
59
47
58

42 54

55

1818 1819 1820 1821 1822 1823 1824 1825 1826 1827 1828 1829 1830 1831 1832 1833 1831 1835 1836 1837 18:38 1839 1840 1841 1842

35 40 46 50 61 56 56 46 56 65 77 78 84 98 100 95 84 112 105 131 117 138 141

58 67 74 92 115 107 110 101 113 134 142 147 152 162 167 174 163 183 191 224 225 263 283 271

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11 10 17 19 14

8 14

6 12 19

6 16 14 10 6 7

26
34

30

1

83 94 103 107

10

9 18 13 21 13 26 9 9 10

24

106 120 138 132 155 157 129

1 0 3 2 3 0 2 3

25 15 11 5 4 7 11 20 13 12

8 13 13 18 29 20

68 64 67 80 77 71 86 93 108 125 142 133

43 42 41 45 64 72 74 69 75 75 80

11
12
11
8

11
15

2142 | 2009

26 | 21 | 186 299

238

262

957

The total amount of expenses of the McLean Asy

lum, for the year ending January 1, 1843, was Receipts for board of patients,

$26,755 03 $30,000 00

BOSTON LUNATIC HOSPITAL.

Number of patients, during the year ending June 30, 1842, 148, of whom 74 were males, and 74 females; of less duration than 1 year, 44; of longer.duration than 1 year, 104.

Number remaining at the end of the year, 95; of less duration than 1 year, 16; of longer duration, 79.

Number discharged, 53 ; recovered, 17; improved, 9; not improved, 10; died, 17.

Number recovered, of less duration than 1 year, 17; im proved, 5; not improved, 1; dead, 5.

Number recovered, of greater duration than 1 year, 0; inproved, 4; not improved, 9; dead, 12.

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