The Roman Poets of the Augustan Age: Horace and the Elegiac Poets

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Biblo & Tannen Publishers, 1990 - 362
This fascinating book traces the development of Roman poetry from the origin of Latin literature to the fall of the Roman Republic. It also looks at the general character of Roman poetry, as well as examining the work of specific poets. William Young Sellar is the author of Roman Poets of the Augustan Age. From 1853-1859 he was an assistant professor at the University of St. Andrew, and from 1859-1863 was Greek Professor at that university. In 1863, to the great regret of St. Andrews, Mr. Sellar went to Edinburgh to fill the Chair of Latin.

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their subjects
xxix
HORACE
xxxiv
CHAPTER I
1
Ethical discourses Sermones i I and
3
Horace as representative of the Augustan
7
Epod
9
Education in Rome and Athens
17
Journey to Brundisium
26
20
212
the circle of Maecenas and the circle
213
their rendering of personal feeling
219
GALLUS TIBULLUS LYGDAMUS SULPICIA
221
His answer to his detractors i
224
22
232
Tibullus detained by illness in Corcyra
234
an exceptional passage ii
241

Carmen Seculare
35
The Odes Books iiii
48
its value as an illustration
53
Stoicism criticised
61
Dialogue on baseness ii
68
IV
74
The Epistles included in the term Sermones
86
Epistle to Lollius on the formation of character
95
CHAPTER IV
102
Horaces account of his poetical and critical powers
109
Tigellius and his allies i
121
The national religious philosophical and ethical Odes
133
Horaces study of the older Greek poets and neglect of the Alexandrians
147
The mission of Rome and Augustus
151
The poems of love and wine
168
V
174
The Sapphic and Alcaic measures
185
characteristics of his phrases
192
CHAPTER I
201
The elegies of Catullus
207
Relation of Tibullus to his contemporaries and to the Empire
247
CHAPTER III
260
26
266
The record of the first book Cynthia Monobiblos
280
30
283
CHAPTER IV
293
artistic excellence of the first book
295
Cynthias ghost
301
the temper of his poetry
310
the mountains
316
33
319
CHAPTER V
324
Two sources of interest in Ovids poetryknowledge of Roman society
330
the pursuit of pleasure
336
Picturesque and fanciful passages
342
their loss of majesty want of reverence
349
The battle of the Centaurs
355
Cadmus and Harmonia the seaidyll of Ceyx
361
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