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The true beginning of our end.

A Midsummer Night's Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.

The best in this kind are but shadows. Ibid.

The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve. feid.

Now, by two-headed Janus, Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.

The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Se. 1.

Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable. Ibid.

You have too much respect upon the world:

They lose it that do buy it with much care. Ibid.

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano •,

A stage where every man must play a part,

And mine a sad one. feid.

Why should a man, whose blood is warm within,

Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster ? lhid.

There are a sort of men whose visages

Do cream and mantle like a standing pond. lhid.

I am Sir Oracle, And when I ope my lips let no dog bark ! Ibid.

Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search. Ibid.

In my sehool-days, when I had lost one shaft,

I shot his fellow of the selfsame flight

The selfsame way, with more advised watch,

To find the other forth; and by adventuring both,

I oft found both. lhid.

They are as sick, that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing.

The Merchant of Venice, Act i. Sc. 2.

Superfluity comes sooner by white hairs, but eompeteney lives longer. 1hid.

If to do were as easy as to know what were good to -io, ehapels had been churches, and poor men's cottages princes' palaces. feid.

God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.

1hid. I dote on his very absence. lhid.

Ships are but boards, sailors but men: there be landrats and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves.

Aet i. Se. 3.

I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following, but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What news on the Rial to? 1hid.

I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him. 1hid.

Even there where merchants most do congregate. 1hid.

The devil can cite Seripture for his purpose. Ibid.

A goodly apple rotten at the heart:

O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath! lhid.

Many a time and oft In the Riaito you have rated me. 1hid.

For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe. Ibid.

And spit upon my Jewish gaherdine. lhid.

In a bondman's key, With hated breath and whispering humbleness. Ibid.

When did friendship take
A breed for barren metal of his friend?

The Merchant of Venice, Act i. Sc. 3.

Mislike me not for my complexion,

The shadowed livery of the burnished sun. Act ii. W. L

According to Fates and Destinies and such odd sayings, the Sisters Three and such branches of learning.

Act ii. Sc. 2.

The very staff of my age, my very prop. Ibid.

It is a wise father that knows his own child. Ibid.

And the vile squeaking of the wry-necked fife.

Act ii. Sc. 5

All things that are,
Are with more spirit chased than enjoyed.
How like a younker or a prodigal,
The scarfed bark puts from her native bay,
Hugged and embraced by the strumpet wind!
How like the prodigal doth she return,
With over-weathered ribs and ragged sails,
Lean, rent, and beggared by the strumpet wind!

Act ii. Sc. 8.

But love is blind and lovers cannot see

The pretty follies that themselves commit. Ibid.

If my gossip Report be an honest woman of her word.

Act iii. Sc. 1.

If it will feed nothing else, it will feed my revenge, ibid.

I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions?

Ibid.

The villany you teach me, I will execute, and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction. Ibid. Makes a swan-like end,

Fading in music. The Merchant of Venice. Aet iii. Sc. 2.

Tell me where is faney bred,

Or in the heart or in the head?
How begot, how nourished?

Reply, reply. lhid.

In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt

But, being seasoned with a graeious voiee,

Obscures the show of evil? lhid.

The kindest man, The hest-eonditioned and unwearied spirit In doing eourtesies. Ibid.

Thus when I shun Scylla, your father, I fall into Charybdis, your mother.1 Act iii. Sc. 5.

Let it serve for tahle-talk. lhid.

A harmless necessary cat Act iv. Se. 1.

What! wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice ?

Ibid. I am a tainted wether of the flock. Ibid.

I never knew so young a body with so old a head. feid.

The quality of mercy is not strained,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath : it is twice hlest;
It hlesseth him that gives and him that takes:
'T is mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes
The throned monarch better than his crown :
His seeptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,

1 1ncidis in Seyllam eupiens vitare Charyhdim Philippe Gual

tier (about the thirteenth century), Alexandreis, Book v. Line 301.

Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;

But mercy is above this seeptred sway;

It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,

It is an attribute to God himself;

And earthly power doth then show likest God's,

When mercy seasons justice. Therefore, Jew,

Though justice be thy plea, consider this,

That, in the course of justice, none of us

Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy ;

And that same prayer doth teach us all to render

The deeds of mercy.

The Merchant of Venice. Act iv. Sc. 1.

A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel! 1hid.

is it so nominated in the bond ?l lhid.

'T is not in the bond. Ibid.

speak me fair in death. lhid.

A second Daniel, a Daniel, Jew!

Now, infidel, I have you on the hip. ihid.

I thank thee, Jew, for teaehing me that word. lhid.

You take my house when you do take the prop
That doth sustain my house; you take my life
When you do take the means whereby I live. lhid.

He is well paid that is well satisfied. lhid.

How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank !
Here we will sit and let the sounds of musie
Creep in our ears: soft stillness and the night
Become the touches of sweet harmony.
Sit, Jessica. Look how the floor of heaven
is thiek inlaid with patines of bright gold:

1 'It is not nominated in the bond,' White.

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