An Inquiry Into the Authenticity of Various Pictures and Prints, Which, from the Decease of the Poet to Our Own Times, Have Been Offered to the Public as Portraits of Shakspeare ...

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Robert Triphook, 1824 - 143
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Strona 48 - Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you, Nor think the bitterness of absence sour When you have bid your servant once adieu ; Nor dare I question with my jealous thought Where you may be, or your affairs suppose, But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought Save, where you are how happy you make those. So true a fool is love that in your will, Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill.
Strona 108 - A mind reflecting ages past, whose clear And equal surface can make things appear, — Distant a thousand years, — and represent Them in their lively colours, just extent : To outrun hasty time, retrieve the fates, Roll back the heavens, blow ope the iron gates Of Death and Lethe, where confused lie Great heaps of ruinous mortality : In that deep dusky dungeon to discern A royal ghost from churls ; by art to learn The physiognomy of shades, and give Them...
Strona 56 - The fire having continued all this night (if I may call that night which was light as day for ten miles round about, after a dreadful manner...
Strona 45 - ... lana Tarentino violas imitata veneno. Ac ne forte putes me, quae facere ipse recusem, cum recte tractent alii, laudare maligne, ille per extentum funem mihi posse videtur 210 ire poeta, meum qui pectus inaniter angit, irritat, mulcet, falsis terroribus implet, ut magus, et, modo me Thebis, modo ponit Athenis.
Strona 37 - tis somewhat more than just to see. Shadows are but privations of the light; Yet, when we walk, they shoot before the sight; With us approach, retire, arise, and fall; Nothing themselves, and yet expressing all. Such are thy pieces, imitating life So near, they almost conquer in the strife; And from their animated canvas came, Demanding souls, and loosen'd from the frame.
Strona 48 - Being your slave , what should I do but tend Upon the hours and times of your desire? I have no precious time at all to spend, Nor services to do , till you require.
Strona 85 - I can now excuse all his foibles ; impute them to age, and to distress of circumstances; the last of these considerations wrings my very soul to think on. For a man of high spirit, conscious of having, at least in one production, generally pleased the world, to be plagued and threatened by wretches that are low in every sense ; to be forced to drink himself into pains of the body, in order to get rid of the pains of the mind, is a misery.
Strona 56 - I know not by what despondency or fate, they hardly stirred to quench it, so that there was nothing heard or seen but crying out and lamentation, running about like distracted creatures, without at all attempting to save even their goods...
Strona 5 - Congenial passions meet th' according rhyme ; The pride of glory — pity's sigh sincere — Youth's earliest blush, and beauty's virgin tear. Such is their meed, their honours thus secure, Whose arts yield objects, and whose works endure. The Actor, only, shrinks from Time's award; Feeble tradition is his memory's guard...

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