Obrazy na stronie
PDF
ePub

Sink not too much on plans; build up your verse —
Songs of a softly swaying tenderness,
Of queenly loves that dwell upon the heart;
Life's melodies, spontaneous as your youth.
He hastened to the studio where he dwelt,
All earnest, quick with deeds, and half content
To be half that he hoped.

Oft of him I dreamed. Alone, of all our youth, or seeming thus, He asked a poet's life, resolved to win The poet's splendor, cultivate that art, Yea, work it for itself — himself forgot. Choice in his friends, most certain with their hearts, Sufficient and unsacrificed to forms So fared he forth that morn.

And then, upon those plains!
A luring region of unhoarded wealth,
Where golden rivers gleam to golden sands,
And far in heaven their purple mountains soar;
There, where the bright snake glitters thro' the sun,
(His touch destruction) and the cougar screams
O'er the salt reaches of earth's aridness,
The sepulchers unblest of bird and flower,
Sunk in some vale, some deep and dismal vale,
Thy burial vault, that Arizona vale,
In thy first youth, thy promise, and soft years,
Killed, murdered, trampled out, destroyed.
Loring! I might have wept thee, hadst thou lived.
And never won thy poet's wreath! And now,
At this, such bitter parting, such recoil,
Once more I see that wan September noon,
Those weeping locks, and list thy modest voice,
A prayer of tender hope to God and man;
And hear the murmur of these mournful streets,
Made lonelier at thy parting, sad to tears,
And think — this was a world thou loved and sang
(A world too poor for thee ), and blend my griefs
With those who loved thee, thou lost Poet-boy.

[ocr errors][merged small]

And a misty sky sweeps o'er me,
And the wild surf sways without measure,
And the white beach that was my pleasure,
And the beat of the fast-heaving sea

Says, Weep not, weep not for me!
We shall die as we lived; it shall be,
Dying, as in living - together;
Our dirge in the wild misty weather,
Our death in the fast-heaving sea .

Farewell, weep not, weep not for me!

III.— THE MAGDALEN.

Her eyes how fixed they seek the skies

Was earth so low, was life so vain? Was time a wearing sacrifice,

This hopeless wish, this empty pain? I cannot read the silent skies ;

Their light is darkness to my heart, Life is eternal sacrifice

Its livelong hours, its lifeless art.
“ Thought cannot mend my breaking hope,

Heaven will not warm such cold despair-
I need some other soul to ope
My doors of steel, and trust my prayer.

“ Speeds there no sail o'er life's dark sea,

Where weeps some heart whose hope has set, Who may uplift this cross from me,

And both may thus their past forget ?”

IV.- THE RETROSPECT.

Why should we mourn the fleeting days,
Why grieve because the years are still —
That Grecian art, that modern phrase,
Like fluttering leaves drop o'er the hill?

If it may seem that all is gone,
Which colored Time like golden flame,
That love and hope and fame have flown,
Trusting their servant but the name!

Yet in that just alloy of fate
The sundered plans shall moulded fall,
A hero's heart, a monarch's state,
Thy changeful mood to glory call.

WILLIAM ELLERY CHANNING.

BOOK NOTICES.

ZEITSCHRIFT FUER PHILOSOPHIE UND PHILOSOPHISCHE KRITIK. Herausgegeben

von Dr. I. H. von Fichte, Dr. Hermann Ulrici, und Dr. J. U. Wirth. Halle: C. E. M. Pfeffer. We have volumes 67, 68, 69, 70, and 71 of this periodical accumulated for notice. Volume 67 opens with an article, by Dr. Johann H. Loewe, on “ The Simultaneity of the Genesis of Speech and Thinking;" and Dr. A. Dorner finishes his essay On the Principles of Kant's Ethics. Dr. Steffens begins the discussion of the question, “What Advantages can We Derive from the Writings of Aristotle for our Knowledge of the History of Greek Philosophy from the Times of Thales to those of Plato ? Dr. Franz Hoffmann also has a first article on the subject, “ AntiMaterialism,” having a refutation of Buechner's recent writings in view. Dr. Ulrici reviews Brentano's “Psychology from an Empirical Stand-point," and Dr. Pfleiderer's “Modern Pessimism.” Dr. Fortlage reviews Dr. Ulrici's work, “ On the Union of the Same or Similar Elements in the Substance of our Representations, in Reference to Body and Soul;' and Dr. Ulrici improves the occasion to reply to some of Dr. Fortlage's strictures. Ulrici lays particular stress on the fact that the term “unconscious representations of the mind” is contradictory, illogical, and unwarranted by the use of language; the word “ Vorstellung" (representation) being applicable only to contents of our consciousness.

In volume 68 the article by Dr. Steffens, above referred to, is continued, and Dr. Hoffmann's concluded. Dr. Rehnisch contributes an article “On the Results of Moral Statistics.” Dr. Sengler reviews Hölder's “Darstellung der Kantischen Erkenntnisstheorie;" also “Kant's Teleologie," and Witte's “ Beitraege zum Verstaendnisse Kant's.” Dr. Erdmann reviews Von Hartmann's Transcendental Realism; and Ulrici notices Dr. A. L. Kym's Metapbysical Investigations, George Henry Lewes' “History of Modern Philosophy," and Dr. McCosh's “Laws of Discursive Thought.” He has also reviews of Alexander Jung's “Panacee and Theodicee,” Volkmar's "Lehrbuch der Psychologie,” and “La pena di morte e la sua abolizione dichiarate teoreticamente e storicamente secondo la filosofia Hegeliana per Pasquale d'Ercole, Professore nell' Università di Pavia."

Volume 69 closes Dr. Steffens' treatise ; also that of Dr. Rehnisch. Professor Arth. Richter contributes “Kant als Æsthetiker;" Professor Spicker, “Mensch und Thier;" and Lorenz Muellner has an article on “ Wilhelm Rosenkrantz's Philosophie.” Of reviews we mention: Siebert's “Das Wesen der ästhetischen Anschauung,” by Moritz Carrière, and Hermann's “Die Æsthetik in ihrer Geschichte,” by the same. Ulrici reviews Lotze's “Logik," and Dr. Zeller's History of German Philosophy since Leibnitz.

In volume 70, Muellner finishes his essay on Wilhelm Rosenkrantz, and Edward Grimm has an article on “Malebranche's Erkenntnisstheorie” in relation to that of Descartes. Dr. Schloemilch has some “Philosophical Aphorisms of a Mathematician.” Professor Fichte has a lengthy review of Perty's excellent work, “ The Soul-Life of Animals ;” and Ulrici uses R. G. Hazard's letters to Mill as a text for a general polemic against Mill's philosophy. Both of these reviews, notably that of Fichte, are more in the nature of original and independent articles than of mere criticism of another author's work, and deserve special attention. Dr. Schulze has an article on Leibnitz's Theodicee; and Professor Franz Hoffmann contributes an article on Von Baader's Place in the History of German Philosophy. We have as yet received only the first number of volume 71. It is opened by Dr. Ulrici in an article on "How we Arrive at the Representation of the Differences of Things;" which is followed by an article from the pen of Professor I. H. Fichte commemorating the testimony of the great German “Naturforscher,” K. E. von Baer — whose death, in November, 1876, has called renewed attention to his works — in favor of a teleological view of the universe. Theodor von Barnbueler has an article on “Analysis and Synthesis.” Professor Hoffmann reviews Dr. Wigand's “Darwinismus ;” and also Dr. L. Weis' work on “Idealism and Materialism." M. Carrière has an article on Fechner's “ Vorschule zur Aesthetik;" Dr. Lasson notices Paul Janets' “Les Causes Finales;" and I. H. Fichte reviews G. Mehring's work, "Die philosophisch Kritischen Grundsaetze der Selbst-Vollendung oder die Geschichts-Philosophie.”

A. E. K.

THE CANADIAN MONTHLY AND NATIONAL REVIEW. Toronto: Adam, Stevenson

& Co.

We have received the May number for 1876 of this excellent monthly, with an article on “Science and Religion," by John Watson, M. A., Professor of Philosophy, Queen's University, Kingston. The article is in the nature of a reply to Professor Tyndall, and like other articles of Professor Watson, which our readers have seen, is of extraordinary merit.

PRINCIPIA OR BASIS OF SOCIAL SCIENCE; BEING A SURVEY OF THE SUBJECT

FROM THE MORAL AND THEOLOGICAL, YET LIBERAL AND PROGRESSIVE, STAND-POINT. By R. J. Wright. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co.

This work is interesting as treating a subject - Socialism -- which is engaging so much of public attention of late years from a new quasi-religious point of view. It is, however, also valuable for the information which it affords. A. E. K.

SOUL PROBLEMS, WITH OTHER PAPERS. By Joseph E. Peck. New York:

Charles P. Somerby. 1875.

The motto of this pamphlet is: “For every man must, according to the measure of his understanding and leisure, speak that which he speaketh, and do that which he doeth.” — King Alfred.

A SERIES OF EssAYS ON LEGAL TOPICS. By James Parsons, Professor in the

Law Department of the University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia : Rees Welsh. 1876.

There are seven essays in this handsomely-printed little book of 153 pages: “Law as a Science;" “ Parties to an Action;” “The Statute of Frauds, Section Fourth ;” The Project of a Digest of the Common Law, either as a Preliminary to a Code or as a Finality;” “Can a Use be limited upon a Use at Common Law?” “ The Doctrine of Accord and Satisfaction ;” and “The History and Growth of civil Institutions.” Mr. Parsons is an uncompromising opponent of the Code as against the Common-Law System, and lets no occasion slip to advance his views on that topic.

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY AS A PHILOSOPHER AND REFORMER. By Charles

Sotheran. New York: Charles P. Somerby. 1876.

Mr. Sotheran is well known as a writer on spiritualism and kindred subjects. This neatly-printed pamphlet has a portrait of Shelley and a view of his tomb. It is dedicated to Mr. Charles W. Frederickson, of New York.

ELEMENTS DE PHILOSOPHIE POPULAIRE. Par 0. Merten, Professor de Philoso

phie a L'université De Gand. Namur: Librairie de Ad. Wesmael-Charlier. 1876.

A modest little work which proposes to furnish for general readers the chief results obtained from the application of the empirical method of observation to philosophy.

INAUGURAL ADDRESS. Bv S. S. Laurie, A. M., Professor of the Theory, His

tory, and Practice of Education in the University of Edinburgh. Edinburgh: Edmonston & Douglas. 1876.

Mr. Laurie shows in this address not only the experienced educator, but also the scholar of philosophical culture and mode of thinking.

THE HISTORICAL JESUS OF NAZARETH. By M. Schlesinger, Ph. D., Rabbi of

the Congregation Anshe Emeth, Albany, N. Y. New York: Charles P. Somerby. 1876. A condensed sketch of the life of Christ, and of the first spread of His teachings.

A CRITICAL ACCOUNT OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF KANT. WITH AN HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION. By Edward Caird, M. A. London and New York: MacMillan & Co. 1877.

“The object of this work,” says Mr. Caird in the preface, “is to explain the Critical Philosophy in its relation to the general development of Philosophy, and especially to the stages of that development which immediately preceded it.” We can assure the reader that this object has been accomplished with rare success. The latter part especially, namely, the relation of Kant's system of Transcendental Philosophy to “the stages which immediately preceded it," is so fully set forth, and is, taking it all together, so new to even the best informed of Kant's students that it seems entirely out of place to apply a word of censure in regard to the exposition of the Critical Philosophy itself. We hope at a future time to give our readers an extended account of this great work, but, for the present, we confine ourselves to giving an outline of the rich contents of Mr. Caird's work, by transcribing the headings of its several parts and chapters.

Introduction. — Chapter I. The Critical Problem. Chapter II. The Critical Spirit in Ancient and Mediæval Philosophy. Chapter III. The first Period of Modern Philosophy - Descartes and Spinoza. Chapter IV. The second Period of Modern Philosophy--Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. Chapter V. The second Period of Modern Philosophy--Leibnitz. Chapter VI. The second Period of Modern Philosophy - The Wolffian Philosophy.

The Philosophy of Kant. Part I. The Pre-critical Period. Part II. The Criticism of Pure Reason. Chapter I. The Problem of the Critique, and Kant's Preliminary Statement and Sense. Chapter II. Understanding and Sense. Chapter III. Argument of the Esthetic. Chapter IV. Criticism of the Esthetic. Chapter V. General View of the Analytic. Chapter VI. The two Logics and the Discovery of the Categories. Chapter VII. Kant's Preliminary Statement of the object of the Transcendental Deduction. Chapter VIII. The Transcendental

« PoprzedniaDalej »