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CLASSICAL DICTIONARY:

CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF

THE PRINCIPAL PROPER NAMES

y i' MENTIONED I»

ANCIENT AUTHORS,

AND

INTENDED TO ELUCIDATE ALL THE IMPORTANT POINTS CONNECTED WITH THE
■GEOGRAPHY, HI8TORV, BIOGRAPHY, MYTHOLOGY, AND FINE ARTS

OF THE

GREEKS AND ROMANS.

TOGETHER WITH

AN ACCOUNT OF COINS, WEIGHTS, AND MEASURES,

■WITH TABULAR VALUES OF THE SAME.
■Y

CHARLES ANTHON, LL.D.,

JAT'riorEIIOR OF THE GBEEX AND LATIN LANGUAGES IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE,
NEW YORK, AND BECTOR OF THE OBAMMAE-SCH00L.

"Hue vndique gaza."Vieo.

NEW YORK:

HARPER it BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,

329 & 331 PEARL STREET,
FRANKLIN SQUARE.

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TO

JOHN A N T H 0 N, E S Q,

CUUNSELLOR AT LAW. Ac,

THO, AMID THE DUTIES OF A LABORIOUS PROFESSION, CAN STILL FIND LEISURE
FOR HOLDING CONVERSE WITH THE PAGES Or' ANTIQUITY, AND IN WHOM
LEGAL ERUDITION IS SO HAPPILY BLENDED WITH THE LIGHTER
GRACES OF ANCIENT AND MODERN LITERATURE,

mis WORK
i a

AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED,

A FEFBJ.E RETURN FOR MANY ACTS OF FRATERNAL KINDNESS, AND (iF A BROTHER
MAY BE ALLOWED TO EXPRESS HIMSELF IN THIS WAY) AS A TESTIMONIAL
OF FOND REGARD FOR EMINENT ABILITIES IN UNISON
WITH EMINENT INTEGRITY AND WORTH.

PREFACE

TO THE FOURTH EDITION.

In laying the result of his labours before the public, the author wishes it to be distinctly understood, that the present volume is not, as some might perhaps imagine, merely an improved edition of the Classical Dictionary of Lempriere, but a work entirely new, and resembling its predecessor in nothing but the name. The author owes it, in fact, to himself to be thus explicit in his statement, since he would feel but poorly compensated for the heavy toil expended on the present work, were he regarded as having merely remodelled, or given a new arrangement to, the labours of another. So far from this having been done, there are, in truth, but few articles, and those not very important ones, wherein any resemblance can be traced between Lempriere's work and the present. In every other respect, the Classical Dictionary now offered to the public will be found to be as different from Lempriere's as the nature of the case can possibly admit.

It cannot be denied that Lempriere's Classical Dictionary was a very popular work in its day. The numerous editions through which it ran would show this very conclusively, without the necessity of any farther proof. Still, however, it may be asserted with equal safety, that this same popularity was mainly owing to the circumstance of there being no competitor in the field. Considered in itself, indeed, the work put forth but very feeble claims to patronage, for its scholarship was superficial and inaccurate, and its language wa3 frequently marked by a grossness of allusion, which rendered the book a very unfit one to be put into the hands of the young. And yet so strong a hold had it taken of public favour both at home ana in our own country, that not only were no additions or corrections made in the work, but the very idea itself of making such was deemed altogether visionary. The author of the present volume remembers very well what surprise was excited, when, on having been employed to prepare a new edition of Lempriere in 1825, he hinted the propriety of making some alterations in the text. The answer received from a certain quarter was, that one might as well think of making alterations in the Scriptures as in the pages of Dr. Lempriere! and that all an editor had to do was merely to revise the references contained in the English work. When, however, several palpable errors, on the part of Lempriere, had been pointed out by him, and the editor was allowed to correct these and others of a similar kind, he still felt the impossibility of presenting the work to the American public in that state in which alone it ought to have appeared, partly from the undue estimation in which the labours of Dr. Lempriere were as yet generally held, and partly from a consciousness of his own inability, through the want of a more extended course of reading, to do justice to such a task. With all its imperfections, however, the edition referred to was well received; and when a second one was soon after called for, the publisher felt himself imboldened to allow the editor the privilege of introducing more extensive improvements, and of making the work, in every point of view, more deserving of patronage.

The republication of this latter edition in England, and the implied confession, connected with such a step, that the original work of Lempriere stood in need of improvement, now broke the charm which had fettered the judgments of so many of our own countrymen, and it then began to be conceded on all sides that the Classical Dictionary of Dr. Lempriere was by no means entitled to the claim of infallibility; nay, indeed, that it was de fective throughout. When the ownership of the work, therefore, passed into the hands of the Messrs. Carvill, and a new edition was again wanted, those intelligent and enterprising publishers gave the editor permission to make whatever alterations and improvements he might see fit; and the Classical Dictionary now appeared in two octavo volumes, enriched with new materials derived from various sources, and presenting a much fairer claim than before to the attention of the student.

This last-mentioned edition became, in its turn, soon exhausted, and a new one was demanded; when the copyright of the work passed from the Messrs. Carvill to the Brothers

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