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force that they can wholly quench the work of the Spirit, therefore the faithful are called free, yet so that they do acknowledge their infirmity, and glory no whit at all of their free-will. For that which St. Augustine does repeat so often out of the apostle onght always to be kept in mind by the faithful: What hast thou that thou didst not receive? and if thou didst receive it, why dost thou glory, as if thou hadst not received it?' (1 Cor. iv. 7). Hitherto may be added that that comes not straightway to pass which we have purposed, for the events of things are in the hand of God. For which cause Paul be songht the Lord that he would prosper his journey (Rom.i. 10). Wherefore, in this respect also, free-will is very weak.

But in outward things no man denies but that both the regenerate and the unregenerate have their free-will; for man hath this constitution common with other creatures (to whom he is not inferior) to will some things and to nill other things. So he inay speak or keep silence, go out of his house or abide within. Although herein also God's power is evermore to be marked, which brought to pass that Balaam could not go so far as he would (Numb. xxiv. 13), and that Zacharias, coming ont of the Temple, could not speak as he would have done (Luke i. 22).

In this matter we condemn the Manichæans, who deny that the begin. ning of evil unto man, being good, came from his free-will. We condeinn, also, the Pelagians, who affirm that an evil man has free-will sufficiently to perform a good precept. Both these are confuted by the Scripturè, which says to the former, 'God made man upright' (Eccles. vii. 29); and to the latter, ‘If the Son make you free, then ye shall be free indeed” (John viii. 36).

CHAPTER X.-OF THE PREDESTINATION OF GOD AND THE ELECTION OF

THE SAINTS. God has from the beginning freely, and of his mere grace, without any respect of men, predestinated or elected the saints, whom he will save in Christ, according to the saying of the apostle, ' And he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world' (Eph. i. 4); and again, 6 Who hath saved us, and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given unto us, through Jesus Christ, before the world was, but is now made manifest by the appearance of our Saviour Jesus Christ' (2 Tim. i. 9, 10). mands us to garnish our wit, and therewithal he gives gifts and also the increase thereof. And it is a clear case that we can profit very little in all arts without the blessing of God. The Scripture, no donbt, refers all arts to God; yea, and the Gentiles also ascribe the beginnings of arts to the gods, as the authors thereof.

Lastly, we are to consider whether the regenerate have free-will, and how far they have it. In regeneration the understanding is illuminated by the Holy Spirit, that it may understand both the mysteries and will of God. And the will itself is not only changed by the Spirit, but it is also endued with faculties, that, of its own accord, it may both will and do good (Rom. viii. 4). Unless we grant this, we shall deny Christian liberty, and bring in the bondage of the law. Besides, the prophet brings in God speaking thus: 'I will put my laws into their minds, and write them in their hearts' (Jer. xxxi. 33; Ezek. xxxvi. 27). The Lord also says in the Gospel,' If the Son make you free, ye shall be free indeed' (John viii. 36). Paul also to the Philippians, ‘Unto you is given for Christ, not only to believe in him, but also to suffer for his sake' (Phil. i. 29). And, again, 'I am persuaded that he that began this good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ' (ver. 6). Also, 'It is God that worketh in you the will and the deed' (Phil. ii. 13).

Where, nevertheless, we teach that there are two things to be observed--first, that the regenerate, in the choice and working of that which is good, do not only work passively, but actively; for they are moved of God that themselves may do that which they do. And Augustine does truly allege that saying that ‘God is said to be our helper; but no man can be helped but he that does somewhat.' The Manichæans did bereave man of all action, and made him like a stone and a block.

Secondly, that in the regenerate there remains infirmity. For, seeing that sin dwells in ns, and that the flesh in the regenerate strives against the Spirit, even to our lives' end, they do not readily perform in every point that which they had purposed. These things are confirmed by the apostle (Rom. vii. 13-25; Gal. v. 17).

Therefore, all free - will is weak by reason of the relics of the old Adam remaining in us so long as we live, and of the human corruption which so nearly cleaves to us. In the meanwhile, because the strength of the flesh and the relics of the old man are not of such great force that they can wholly quench the work of the Spirit, therefore the faithful are called free, yet so that they do acknowledge their infirmity, and glory no whit at all of their free-will. For that which St. Augustine does repeat so often out of the apostle onght always to be kept in mind by the faithful: “What hast thou that thou didst not receive? and if thou didst receive it, why dost thou glory, as if thou hadst not received it?' (1 Cor. iv. 7). Hitherto may be added that that comes not straightway to pass which we have purposed, for the events of things are in the hand of God. For which cause Paul besonght the Lord that he would prosper his journey (Rom. i. 10). Wherefore, in this respect also, free-will is very weak.

But in outward things no man denies but that both the regenerate and the unregenerate have their free-will; for man hath this constitution common with other creatures (to whom he is not inferior) to will some things and to nill other things. So he inay speak or keep silence, go out of his house or abide within. Although herein also God's power is evermore to be marked, which brought to pass that Balaam could not go so far as he would (Numb. xxiv. 13), and that Zacharias, coming ont of the Temple, could not speak as he would have done (Luke i. 22).

In this matter we condemn the Manichæans, who deny that the beginning of evil unto man, being good, came from his free-will. We condemn, also, the Pelagians, who affirm that an evil man has free-will sufficiently to perform a good precept. Both these are confuted by the Scripture, which says to the former, ‘God made man upright' (Eccles. vii. 29); and to the latter, 'If the Son make you free, then yé shall be free indeed’ (John viii. 36).

CHAPTER X.-OF THE PREDESTINATION OF GOD AND THE ELECTION OF

THE SAINTS. God has from the beginning freely, and of his mere grace, without any respect of men, predestinated or elected the saints, whom he will save in Christ, according to the saying of the apostle, ' And he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world' (Eph. i. 4); and again, "Who hath saved us, and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given unto us, throngh Jesus Christ, before the world was, but is now made manifest by the appearance of our Saviour Jesus Christ' (2 Tim. i. 9, 10). Therefore, though not for any merit of ours, yet not without a means, but in Christ, and for Christ, did God choose us; and they who are now ingrafted into Christ by faith, the same also were elected. But such as are without Christ were rejected, according to the saying of the apostle, “Prove yourselves, whether ye be in the faith. Know ye not your own selves, how that Jesns Christ is in yon, except ye be reprobates? (2 Cor. xiii. 5).

To conclude, the saints are chosen in Christ by God unto a sure end, which end the apostle declares when he says, 'He hath chosen us in him, that we should be holy and without blame before him through lore; who has predestinated us to be adopted through Jesus Christ unto himself, for the praise of his glorious grace?(Eph. i. 4–6).

And although God knows who are his, and now and then mention is made of the small number of the elect, yet we must hope well of all, and not rashly judge any man to be a reprobate: for Paul says to the Philippians, 'I thank my God for you all? (now he speaks of the whole Church of the Philippians), “ that ye are come into the fellowship of the Gospel; and I am persuaded that he that hath begun this work in you will perform it as it becoineth me to judge of yon all? (Phil. i. 3-7).

And when the Lord was asked whether there were few that should be saved, he does not answer and tell them that few or many should be saved or damned, but rather he exhorts every man to strive to enter in at the strait gate' (Luke xiii. 24): as if he should say, It is not for you rashly to inquire of these matters, bnt rather to endeavor that you may enter into heaven by the strait way.

Wherefore we do not allow of the wicked speeches of some who say, Few are chosen, and seeing I know not whether I am in the number of these few, I will not defrand my nature of her desires. Others there are who sar, If I be predestinated and chosen of God, nothing can hinder me front salvation, which is already certainly appointed for me, whatsoever I do at any time; but if I be in the number of the reprobate, no faith or repentance will help me, seeing the decree of God can not be changed: therefore all teachings and admonitions are to no purpose. Now, against these men the saying of the apostle makes much, “The servants of God must be apt to teach, instructing those that are contrary-minded, proving if God' at any time will give them

seed of Abraham' (Heb. ii. 16). And John the apostle says, 'He that believeth not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of God' (1 Jolin iv.3). The flesh of Christ, therefore, was neither flesh in show only, nor yet flesh brought from heaven, as Valentinus and Marcion dreamed.

Moreover, our Lord Jesus Christ had not a soul without sense and reason, as Apollinaris thought; nor flesh without a soul, as Eunomius did teach; but a soul with its reason, and flesh with its senses, by which senses he felt true griefs in the time of his passion, even as he himself witnessed when he said, 'My soul is heavy, even to death' (Matt. xxvi. 38); and, “My soul is troubled,' etc. (John xii. 27).

We acknowledge, therefore, that there be in one and the same Jesus Christ our Lord two natures—the divine and the human nature; and we say that these two are so conjoined or united that they are not swallowed np, confounded, or mingled together; but rather united or joined together in one person (the properties of each nature being safe and remaining still), so that we do worship one Christ our Lord, and not two. I say one, trne God and man, as touching his divine nature, of the same substance with us, and in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin' (Heb. iv. 15).

As, therefore, we detest the heresy of Nestorius, which makes two Christs of one and dissolves the union of the person, so do we abominate the madness of Eutyches and of the Monothelites and Monophysites, who overthrow the propriety of the human nature. - Therefore we do not teach that the divine nature in Christ did suffer, or that Christ, according to his human nature, is yet in the world, and so in every place. For we do neither think nor teach that the body of Christ ceased to be a true body after his glorifying, or that it was deified and so deified that it put off its properties, as touching body and soul, and became altogether a divine nature and began to be one substance alone; therefore we do not allow or receive the unwitty subtleties, and the intricate, obscure, and inconstant disputations of Schwenkfeldt, and such other vain janglers, about this matter; neither are we Schwenkfeldians.

Moreover, we believe that our Lord Jesns Christ did truly suffer and die for us in the flesh, as Peter says (1 Pet. iv. 1). We abhor the most impious madness of the Jacobites, and all the Turks, who execrate the passion of our Lord. Yet we deny not but that the Lord of glory,'

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