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CHAPTER XIII-SMILES AND TEARS.

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thoughts. But if I have done ute there scarcely would have been
wrong, you will pardon me, I hope, enough of them left to plough in.

But the joy of my heartmas I
because I am so anxious about very

was beginning already to myself to dismal things."

"I assure you," I answered, with call her-perceived at a glance the a flourish of my hat, which I had right thing to do; and her smile been practising upon the road, and blush played into one another, " that it is of the very best Eng as the rising sun colours the veil lish society. If we dared, we be weaves. should insist upon it

upon every

“lf Mr Cran-lee will follow me, occasion, Mademoiselle."

a step or two, I will show bim
“ You must not call me that, sir

. place where the dogs dare not to
I am not of the French. I prefer come.”
the English nation very greatly,

"Follow thee! Follow thee! There has only been one name Wha wud na follow thee ? " came given to me by my fatber, and into my head, with a worthier that is Dariel."

sequence than ever was vouch-
"It is the sweetest name in all safed to Highlanders.
the world. Oh, Dariel, am I to "Where the dogs dare not come"
call you Dariel?"

-I kept saying to myself, instead
"If it is agreeable to you, Mr of looking to the right or left. The
Cran-lee, it will be also agreeable music of her voice seemed to linger
to me ; for why should you not in those words, though they bave
pronounce we the same as Stepan not even a fine English sound, let
does, and Allai ?"-oh that was a alone Italian. But my mind wis

" although I so far out of call that it went with
have passed most of my life in them into a goodly parable.
England, and some of it even in men are dogs in comparison with
London, I have not departed from her. Let none of them come near,
the customs of my country, which wherever it may be, except the
are simple

, very simple. See here one dog, that is blest beyond all
is Kuban and Orla too! Will you others."
not make reply to them?"

“Are you a Christian ?" The How could I make reply to question came so suddenly, that it dogs, with Dariel's eyes upon me? sounded like a mild rebuke-but Many fellows would have been no, it was not meant 80. glad to kick Kuban and his son maiden turned towards me at a Orla, to teach them better than to little wicket-gate, and ber face exjump around emotions so far above pressed some doubt about letting them. But not I; or at any rate me come in. not for more than balf a moment; “Yes, I am a Christian," I 80 sweetly was my spirit raised, answered pretty firmly, and then that I never lifted either foot. began to trim a little—“not a very Some of Dariel's gentle nature hot one I should say. Not at all came to strike the balance ; for I bigoted, I mean ; not one of those may bave been a little short of who think that every other person that.

is a heathen." "Good dogs, doble dogs, what a I had made a mull of it. For pattern to us!" I had a very the first time I beheld a smile of choice pair of trousers on, worthy some contempt upon the gentle of Tom Erricker,-if his had been face. And I resolved to be of ever bashful--and in another min- the strictest Orthodoxy evermore,

VOL. CLXI.-NO. DCCCCLXXV.

cruel fall for me

If any one has followed my little such a bright wink from the west, adventures only half as carefully as and so many touches, on the high I have tried to tell them, he will ground and the low, of the ensee that the time had now come couragement of heaven to whatsoand gone

for

my second visit to St ever thing looks up at it, that in Winifred's, otherwise Little Guinib. my heart there must have been a And I would have set forth what sense it had no words for-a forehappened then, if it had been worth cast of its own perhaps that it was mentioning. But except for the going to be pleased, far beyond the medical treatment received, I might pleasure of the eyes and mind. And just as well have stayed away, for I in that prophecy it hit the mark, never got a glimpse of Dariel; and for who should meet me at a windher father was in such a sad state ing of the path but Dariel herself, of mind, that he scarcely cared to no other? Dariel my darling! speak at all. Being a most kind As yet she knew not — and I and courteous gentleman, he begged shivered with the thought that she me to make due allowance for him, might never

care to know – in for this was the anniversary of the what lowly but holy shrine she most unhappy day of his life, and was for ever paramount.

But a in truth it would have been better little blush, such as a white rose for him if he had died before he might feel at the mark H.C. in an saw that day. One of the worst exhibition, answered my admiring things of being gentleman, or of gaze; and then I was nowhere in having high-culture like Miss Tick- the splendour of her eyes nor, is that you must not ask where, except for being altogether questions, or even bint at your de- there. sire to know more, but sit upon the But with no such disturbance edge of curiosity in silence, although was her mind astray. Alas it was it may be cutting you like hoop-iron "all there," as sharp as the wits on the top-rail. And this feeling of the last man who wanted to sell was not by any means allayed, when me a horse. And she did not want I saw the great henchman Stepan to sell me anything; only to keep in the court hanging his head, and her precious value to herself. What without his red cross; and when a shame it is to leave things so that with the tender of five shillings' a poor fellow never knows how to worth of sympathy, I ventured to begin! But that was not her ask him to explain his woe, his only meaning. In all her lovely life, answer was“Me no can.

she never meant anything that was But when another week had not kind. passed, and my next visit became "I am not quite assured," she due, the hills, and the valley, and began, after waiting for me to be everything else had put on a differ- ginmas if I could, with the tongue ent complexion. It was not like a in such a turbulence of eyes and sunset when the year is growing heart !~“it is beyond my knowold; but as lively and lovely as a ledge of English society, Mr Cranmorning of the May, when all the lee, to be confident that I am takearth is clad in fresh apparel, and ing the correct step, in advancing all the air is full of smiling glances in this manner to declare to you at it. There came to my perception the things that have come into my

no

* All

The

E

name

ever

was

thoughts. But if I have done ute there scarcely would have been wrong, you will pardon me, I hope, enough of them left to plough in. because I am so apxious about very But the joy of my heart—as I dismal things."

was beginning already to myself to “I assure you,” I answered, with call her-perceived at a glance the a flourish of my hat, which I had right thing to do; and her smile been practising upon the road, and blush played into one another, “that it is of the very best Eng- as the rising sun colours the veil lish society. If we dared, we he weaves. should insist upon it upon every

“lf Mr Cran-lee will follow me, occasion, Mademoiselle.”

a step or two, I will show him a “ You must not call me that, sir. place where the dogs dare not to I am not of the French. I prefer come.” the English nation very greatly. Follow thee ! Follow thee ! There has only been one Wha wud na follow thee?” came given to me by my father, and into my head, with a worthier that is Dariel.

sequence than

vouch“It is the sweetest name in all safed to Highlanders. the world. Oh, Dariel, am I to “Where the dogs dare not come" call you Dariel ?"

-I kept saying to myself, instead “If it is agreeable to you, Mr of looking to the right or left. The Cran-lee, it will be also agreeable music of her voice seemed to linger to me for why should you not in those words, though they have pronounce me the same as Stepan not even a fine English sound, let does, and Allai?"-oh that was a alone Italian. But my mind was cruel fall for me — “although I so far out of call that it went with have passed most of my life in them into a goodly parable. “All England, and some of it even in men are dogs in comparison with London, I have not departed from her. Let none of them come near, the customs of my country, which wherever it may be, except the are simple, very simple. See here one dog, that is blest beyond all is Kuban and Orla too! Will you others." not make reply to them ?”

"Are you a Christian ?” The How could I make reply to question came so suddenly, that it dogs, with Dariel's eyes upon me? sounded like a mild rebuke—but Many fellows would have been no, it was not meant so. The glad to kick Kuban and his son maiden turned towards me at a Orla, to teach them better than to little wicket-gate, and her face exjump around emotions so far above pressed some doubt about letting them. But not I; or at any rate me come in. not for more than half a moment; “Yes, I am a Christian,” I 80 sweetly was my spirit raised, answered pretty firmly, and then that I never lifted either foot. began to trim a little—“not a very Some of Dariel's gentle nature hot one I should say. Not at all came to strike the balance; for I bigoted, I mean; not one of those may bave been a little short of who think that every other person that.

is a heathen.” “Good dogs, noble dogs, what a I had made a mull of it. For pattern to us!” I had a very the first time I beheld a smile of choice pair of trousers on, worthy some contempt upon the gentle of Tom Erricker,-if his had been face. And I resolved to be of ever bashful—and in another min- the strictest Orthodoxy evermore,

VOL. CLXI.- NO. DCCCCLXXV.

CHAPTER XIII, -SMILES AND TEARS.

- in

But a

If any one has followed my little such a bright wink from the west, adventures only half as carefully as and so many touches, on the high I have tried to tell them, he will ground and the low, of the ensee that the time had now come couragement of heaven to whatsoand gone

for
my

second visit to St ever thing looks up at it, that in Winifred's, otherwise Little Guinib. my heart there must have been a And I would have set forth what sense it had no words for—a forehappened then, if it had been worth cast of its own perhaps that it was mentioning. But except for the going to be pleased, far beyond the medical treatment received, I might pleasure of the eyes and mind. And just as well have stayed away, for I in that prophecy it hit the mark, never got a glimpse of Dariel; and for who should meet me at a windher father was in such a sad state ing of the path but Dariel herself, of mind, that he scarcely cared to no other? Dariel my darling! speak at all. Being a most kind As yet she knew not — and I and courteous gentleman, he begged shivered with the thought that she me to make due allowance for him, might never care to know for this was the anniversary of the what lowly but holy shrine she most unhappy day of his life, and was for ever paramount. in truth it would have been better little blush, such as a white rose for him if he had died before he might feel at the mark H.C. in an saw that day. One of the worst exhibition, answered my admiring things of being a gentleman, or of gaze; and then I was nowhere in having high-culture like Miss Tick- the splendour of her eyes — nonor, is that you must not ask where, except for being altogether questions, or even hint at your de there. sire to know more,

but sit
upon

the But with no such disturbance edge of curiosity in silence, although was her mind astray. Alas it was it may be cutting you like hoop-iron “all there,” as sharp as the wits on the top-rail. And this feeling of the last man who wanted to sell was not by any means allayed, when me a horse. And she did not want I saw the great henchman Stepan to sell me anything; only to keep in the court hanging his head, and her precious value to herself

. What without his red cross; and when a shame it is to leave things so that with the tender of five shillings' a poor fellow never knows how to worth of sympathy, I ventured to begin ! But that was not her ask him to explain his woe, his only meaning. In all her lovely life, answer was—“Me no can.”

she never meant anything that was But when another week had not kind. passed, and my next visit became "I am not quite assured," she due, the hills, and the valley, and began, after waiting for me to beeverything else had put on a differ- gin—as if I could, with the tongue ent complexion. It was not like a in such a turbulence of eyes and sunset when the year is growing heart !—“it is beyond my knowold; but as lively and lovely as a ledge of English society, Mr Cranmorning of the May, when all the lee, to be confident that I am takearth is clad in fresh apparel, and ing the correct step, in advancing all the air is full of smiling glances in this manner to declare to you at it. There came to my perception the things that have come into my

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thoughts. But if I have done ute there scarcely would have been wrong, you will pardon me, I hope, enough of them left to plough in. because I am so anxious about very But the joy of my heart—as I dismal things."

was beginning already to myself to “I assure you,” I answered, with call her-perceived at a glance the a flourish of my hat, which I had right thing to do; and her smile been practising upon the road, and blush played into one another, “that it is of the very best Eng- as the rising sun colours the veil lish society If we dared, we he weaves. should insist upon it upon every

“If Mr Cran-lee will follow me, occasion, Mademoiselle.”

a step or two, I will show bim a “ You must not call me that, sir. place where the dogs dare not to I am not of the French. I prefer come.” the English nation very greatly. “Follow thee ! Follow thee! There has only been one Wha wud na follow thee?" given to me by my father, and into my head, with a worthier that is Dariel.

sequence than ever

was vouch“It is the sweetest name in all safed to Highlanders. the world. Oh, Dariel, am I to “Where the dogs dare not come call you Dariel ?"

-I kept saying to myself, instead “If it is agreeable to you, Mr of looking to the right or left. The Cran-lee, it will be also agreeable music of her voice seemed to linger to me; for why should you not in those words, though they have pronounce me the same as Stepan not even a fine English sound, let does, and Allai?”—oh that was a alone Italian. But my mind was cruel fall for me — " although I so far out of call that it went with have passed most of my life in them into a goodly parable. “All England, and some of it even in men are dogs in comparison with London, I have not departed from her. Let none of them come near, the customs of my country, which wherever it may be, except the are simple, very simple. See here one dog, that is blest beyond all is Kuban and Orla too! Will you others." not make reply to them ?”

“Are you a Christian ?” The How could I make reply to question came so suddenly, that it dogs, with Dariel's eyes upon me? sounded like a mild rebuke—but Many fellows would have been no, it was not meant so. The glad to kick Kuban and his son maiden turned towards me at a Orla, to teach them better than to little wicket-gate, and her face exjump around emotions so far above pressed some doubt about letting them. But not I; or at any rate me come in. not for more than balf a moment; Yes, I am a Christian," I 80 sweetly was my spirit raised, answered pretty firmly, and then that I never lifted either foot. began to trim a little—“not a very Some of Dariel's gentle nature hot one I should say. Not at all came to strike the balance ; for I bigoted, I mean ; not one of those may bave been a little short of who think that every other person that.

is a heathen.” “Good dogs, noble dogs, what a I had made a mull of it. For pattern to us!” I bad a very the first time I beheld a smile of choice pair of trousers on, worthy some contempt upon the gentle of Tom Erricker,-if his had been face. And I resolved to be of ever bashful—and in another min. the strictest Orthodoxy evermore,

VOL. CLXI.- NO. DCCCCLXXV.

E

CHAPTER XIII, -SMILES AND TEARS.

in

But a

If any one has followed my little such a bright wink from the west, adventures only half as carefully as and so many touches, on the high I have tried to tell them, he will ground and the low, of the ensee that the time had now come couragement of heaven to whatsoand gone for my second visit to St ever thing looks up at it, that in Winifred's, otherwise Little Guinib. my heart there must have been a And I would have set forth what sense it had no words for—a forehappened then, if it had been worth cast of its own perhaps that it was mentioning. But except for the going to be pleased, far beyond the medical treatment received, I might pleasure of the eyes and mind. And just as well have stayed away, for I in that prophecy it hit the mark, never got a glimpse of Dariel; and for who should meet me at a windher father was in such a sad state ing of the path but Dariel herself, of mind, that he scarcely cared to no other? Dariel my darling! speak at all. Being a most kind As yet she knew not — and I and courteous gentleman, he begged shivered with the thought that she me to make due allowance for him, might never care to know for this was the anniversary of the what lowly but holy shrine she most unhappy day of his life, and was for ever paramount. in truth it would have been better little blush, such as a white rose for him if he had died before he might feel at the mark H.C. in an saw that day. One of the worst exhibition, answered my admiring things of being a gentleman, or of gaze; and then I was nowhere in having high-culture like Miss Tick the splendour of her eyes — nonor, is that you must not ask where, except for being altogether questions, or even hint at your de- there. sire to know more, but sit upon

the

But with no such disturbance edge of curiosity in silence, although was her mind astray. Alas it was it may be cutting you like hoop-iron "all there,” as sharp as the wits on the top-rail. And this feeling of the last man who wanted to sell was not by any means allayed, when me a horse. And she did not want I saw the great henchman Stepan to sell me anything; only to keep in the court hanging his head, and her precious value to herself. What without his red cross; and when a shame it is to leave things so that with the tender of five shillings' a poor fellow never knows how to worth of sympathy, I ventured to begin ! But that was not her ask him to explain his woe, his only meaning. In all her lovely life, answer was—“Me no can.”

she never meant anything that was But when another week had not kind. passed, and my next visit became "I am not quite assured," she due, the hills, and the valley, and began, after waiting for me to beeverything else had put on a differ- gin—as if I could, with the tongue ent complexion. It was not like a in such a turbulence of eyes and sunset when the year is growing heart !—“it is beyond my knowold; but as lively and lovely as a ledge of English society, Mr Cranmorning of the May, when all the lee, to be confident that I am takearth is clad in fresh apparel, and ing the correct step, in advancing all the air is full of smiling glances in this manner to declare to you at it. There came to my perception the things that have come into my

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