The Rambler [by S. Johnson and others]., Tom 6

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Strona 20 - And, when I die, be sure you let me know Great Homer died three thousand years ago. Why did I write? what sin to me unknown Dipp'd me in ink, my parents', or my own?
Strona 110 - These lines are perhaps as plain, simple and unadorned as any of the whole poem, in which particular the author has conformed himself to the example of Homer, and the precept of Horace.
Strona 263 - ... because we have made ourselves delicate and tender; we are on every side in danger of error and of guilt, which we are certain to avoid only by speedy forgiveness. From this...
Strona 263 - It is always an ignorant, lazy, or cowardly acquiescence in a false appearance of excellence, and proceeds not from consciousness of our attainments, but insensibility of our wants, Nothing can be great which is not right. Nothing which reason condemns can be suitable to the dignity of the human mind. To be driven by external motives from the path which our own heart approves, to give way to...
Strona 20 - This modeft ftone, what few vain marbles can, May truly fay, Here lies an honeft man...
Strona 14 - Bruyere declares, that we are come into the world too late to produce any thing new, that nature and life are preoccupied, and that description and sentiment have been long exhausted.
Strona 264 - But that pride which many, who presume to boast of generous sentiments, allow to regulate their measures, has nothing nobler in view than the approbation of men, of beings whose superiority we are under no obligation to acknowledge, and who, when we have courted them with the utmost assiduity...
Strona 263 - The utmost excellence at which humanity can arrive is a constant and determinate pursuit of virtue, without regard to present dangers or advantage ; a continual reference of every action to the Divine will; an habitual appeal to everlasting justice ; and an unvaried elevation of the intellectual eye to the reward which perseverance only can obtain.
Strona 135 - Every man is rich or poor, according to the proportion between his desires and enjoyments : any enlargement of...
Strona 111 - On stormy seas unnumber'd toils he bore, Safe with his friends to gain his natal shore: Vain toils! their impious folly dar'd to prey On herds devoted to the god of day; The god vindictive doom'd them never more (Ah men unbless'd) to touch that natal shore.

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