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XLVII. “ And at length when ye complain With a murmur weak and vain, 'Tis to see the Tyrant's crew Ride over your wives and you--Blood is on the grass like dew.

XLVIII.
“Then it is to feel revenge
Fiercely thirsting to exchange
Blood for blood-and wrong for wrong-
Do not thus when ye are strong.

XLIX.
“ Birds find rest in narrow nest
When weary of their wingèd quest;
Beasts find fare in woody lair
When storm and snow are in the air. ?

“ Asses, swine, have litter spread
And with fitting food are fed ;
All things have a home but one-
Thou, Oh, Englishman, hast none !

LI. “This is Slavery-savage men, Or wild beasts within a den Would endure not as ye doBut such ills they never knew. 1 A stanza designed to go between this and the nest is extant, namely :

Horses, oxen, have a home,
When from daily toil they come ;
Household dogs, when the wind roars,

Find a home within warm doors. The rejection of this passage as superfluous was doubtless wise. -ED.

LII. . “ What art thou Freedom ? O! could slaves Answer from their living graves This demand-tyrants would flee Like a dream's dim imagery :

LIII.

“Thou art not, as impostors say,
A shadow soon to pass away,
A superstition, and a name
Echoing from the cave of Fame.

LIV.
“For the labourer thou art bread,
And a comely table spread,
From his daily labour come,
In a neat and happy home.

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LV.
“ Thou art clothes, and fire, and food
For the trampled multitude-
No-in countries that are free
Such starvation cannot be
As in England now we see.

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LVII.
“ Thou art Justice-ne'er for gold
May thy righteous laws be sold
As laws are in England—thou
Shield'st alike the high and low.

LVIII.
“ Thou art Wisdom-Freemen never
Dream that God will damn for ever
All who think those things untrue
Of which Priests make such ado.

LIX.
“ Thou art Peace-never by thee
Would blood and treasure wasted be
As tyrants wasted them, when all
Leagued to quench thy flame in Gaul.

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“ What if English toil and blood
Was poured forth, even as a flood ?
It availed, Oh, Liberty!
To dim, but not extinguish thee.

LXI.
“ Thou art Love-the rich have kissed
Thy feet, and like him following Christ
Give their substance to the free
And through the rough world follow thee,

LXII. “Or turn their wealth to arms, and make War for thy beloved sake On wealth, and war, and fraud—whence they Drew the power which is their prey.

LXIII.
“ Science, Poetry and Thought
Are thy lamps; they make the lot
Of the dwellers in a cot
So serene, they curse it not.

LXIV.
“Spirit, Patience, Gentleness,
All that can adorn and bless
Art thou---let deeds, not words, express
Thine exceeding loveliness.

Lxv.
“Let a great Assembly be
Of the fearless and the free
On some spot of English ground
Where the plains stretch wide aroun).

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“Let the blue sky overhead,
The green earth on which ye tread,
All that must eternal be,
Witness the solemnity.

LXVII.
“From the corners utterinost
Of the bounds of English coast;
From every hut, village and town
Where those who live and suffer moan
For others' misery or their own,

LXVIII.
“From the workhouse and the prison
Where, pale as corpses newly risen,
Women, children, young and old
Groan for pain, and weep for cold-

? The following stanza was rejected from this place :

From the cities where from caves
Like the dead from putrid graves
Troops of starvelings gliding come
Living tenants of a tomb.-ED.

LXIX. “From the haunts of daily life Where is waged the daily strife With common wants and common cares Which sows the human heart with tares

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LXXI. “ Those prison halls of wealth and fashion Where some few feel such compassion For those who groan, and toil, and wail As must make their brethren pale

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“ Ye who suffer woes untold,
Or to feel, or to behold
Your lost country bought and sold
With a price of blood and gold-

LXXIII.
“Let a vast assembly be,
And with great solemnity
Declare with measured words that ye
Are, as God has made ye, free-

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“Be your strong and simple words
Keen to wound as sharpened swords,
And wide as targes let them be,
With their shade to cover ye.

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