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WORKS PUBLISHED BY T. AND T. CLARK,

Rev. Robert Montgomery, THE GOSPEL in ADVANCE of the AGE: being a Homily for the Times. By

the Rev. ROBERT MONTGOMERY, M.A., Oxon., Minister of Percy Chapel, London, Author of “ Christ our All in all," “ Luther on the Spirit of the Reformation,” “The Messiah,” &c. &c. Third Edition, Revised, Re-arranged, and considerably Augmented. 8vo, 12s., cloth.

“ This most eloquent work is a “homily for the times.' The language is eloquent, and the style simple and beautiful.”—Church Warder.

“A remarkable and powerful work, wherein there is much that is most valuable and full of thought and originality: some passages on the baptismal doctrine would do honour to any pen.” -Scottish Magazine,

“ Instinct with talent, with powerful reasoning, and with noble elevation of thought.”—Morn. ing Herald.

Rev. W. Trollope. THE GREEK LITURGY of ST JAMES. Edited with an English Introduc

- tion and Notes, together with a Latin Version of the Syriac Copy, and the Greek Text restored to its Original Purity, and accompanied by a Literal English Translation. By the Rev. W. TROLLOPE, M.A., Pembroke College, Cambridge. 8vo, 45., cloth.

“We have now before us all the materials for correct information.”_Church of England Quarterly. “ An elaborate and learned publication.”—Cambridge Chronicle.

“ Evidently the fruit of great care, of much patient research, of an amateur devotion to the subject, and sound learning.–Cambridge Advertiser.

« A most valuable literary labour." -Bell's Weekly Messenger.

Rev. S. Davidson. SACRED HERMENEUTICS DEVELOPED and APPLIED, including a HIS• TORY of BIBLICAL INTERPRETATION from the EARLIEST of the FATHERS to the REFORMATION. By the Rev. Samuel DAVIDSON, LL.D., Author of “Lectures on Bibli. cal Criticism." 8vo, price 21s., cloth.

“ Nothing seems to be left undone which could be brought within the prescribed limits, and all that has been done appears to be well done, and treated in an intelligent and masterly manner. Dr D., we are sure, will not be offended at our expressing regret that he does not belong to our own Church, and that the work did not proceed from Oxford or Cambridge, to either of which it would have done honour."-Church of England Quarterly Review.

Dr E. Robinson, A GREEK and ENGLISH LEXICON of the NEW TESTAMENT. By EDWARD A ROBINSON, D.D., late Prof. Extraord. of Sac. Lit. in the Theol. Sem., Andover. A new and improved edition, revised by ALEXANDER Negris, Professor of Greek Literature, and by the Rev. John Duncan, D.D., Professor of Oriental Languages in the New College, Edinburgh. One thick vol., 8vo, price 15s.

Rev. John Anderson. CHRONICLES of the KIRK; or, SCENES and STORIES from the HISTORY

of the CHURCH of SCOTLAND from the EARLIEST PERIOD to the SECOND REFORMATION. For the Young. By the Rev. John ANDERSON, Minister of the Free Church, Helensburgh, Author of the “ Footsteps of the Flock,” &c. 6s. cloth, or 6s. 6d. gilt edges.

“ Its gracefulness and brevity give it much adaptation for its purpose.”British Quarterly Reriew. “A very attractive volume—the design and execution are alike admirable.”- Ulster Banner.

Hermann Venema. TRANSLATION of HERMANN VENEMA'S INEDITED INSTITUTES of + THEOLOGY. By the Rev. Alex. W. Brown, Minister of Free St Bernard's Church, Edinburgh. 8vo, 8s. 6d., cloth.

« A learned divine and godly man. We must express our conviction that the translator has enriched our English theology with a work far superior to many which are held in high estimation, and we expect it will be accepted as such by students and divines.”—Nonconformist.

A COMPENDIUM

OF

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY,

DR JOHN C. L. GIESELER,

CONSISTORAL COUNSELLOR AND ORDINARY PROFESSOR OF THEOLOGY IN GÖTTINGEN.

FOURTH EDITION REVISED AND AMENDED.

TRANSLATED FROM THE GERMAN,

BY THE

REV. JOHN WINSTANLEY HULL, M.A.,

INCUMBENT OF ST MICHAEL'S, GRIMSARGH.

VOLUME III.

EDINBURGH: T. & T. CLARK, 38 GEORGE STREET. LONDON: HAMILTON, ADAMS, AND CO.; SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO.; SEELEY AND Co.: WARD AND CO.; JACKSON AND WALFORD, ETC.

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The sixteen years which have elapsed, since the appearance of the Third Edition of the Volume here presented to the Public, have been so uncommonly rich in the production of materials, and in encouragement to further researches into this period also which we have here in hand, that a new and thoroughly revised edition may well be expected from me. Traces will everywhere be found, that the Volume here presented has undergone such revision. If the increase in the number of sheets is proportionately insignificant (this edition is only two sheets thicker than the former); the reason is this, that I have laboured to find place for the new matter, by curtailing the expression, and by omitting much that was superfluous, particularly in the quotations. Two new paragraphs are added, § 81. on Art employed in the service of the Church, and § 82. on the Caland-guilds. While I mention the latter, I cannot forbear from expressing my astonishment, that, although in an altered form they are still so often met with in Northern Germany, they have never yet been made the subject of any general historical representation, entering into their origin and their character; great as is the number of accounts of separate Caland-guilds, which are mostly occupied with their external description.

The last thirty years constitute a period richer in historic lore than any that has ever been as yet. A vast number of sources of history have been drawn forth from concealment, or issued in a simpler form. Countless treatises have thrown a new light on dark questions. Upon almost all portions of history we have received works, which are remarkable for thorough investigation, views full of genius, or interesting representation. If this period of scientific activity in the cause of history, seems now to be brought to a close, the question arises, whether the reason lies only in outward circumstances, or also in the fact, that the interest felt among our people in history, has been weakened by the powerful agitations of this year. It is an unmistakeable truth, that a portion of the men of the day, who have taken the most active part in the late agitations, appear to have broken away from history altogether, and to wish to shut their eyes to any development connecting present events with the history of the past. Just as though all that has been hitherto establisht had forfeited its claim to endure; as though their object were now to build anew from the foundation, upon a ground completely levelled, without any regard to the building which stood there before. In all history, the history of the French revolution alone seems to be recognized by them as their guide from step to step in their career.

However the impulse of a small party must not be mistaken for the actual opinion of the German nation, though every artifice be tried to represent it as such. No German race desires to break entirely with its history. Great indeed would be the misfortune, if a party were to succeed in interrupting the natural development of events by an arbitrary constitution. It would stand without root in the people. The handiwork of one party would quickly be dislodged by that of another; and Germany would be plunged into a whirlpool of change, continually stirring up the very depths of society.

This is true in a political, true also in an ecclesiastical point of view. But artificial creation in the room of natural development, is even almost more dangerous on ecclesiastical, than on political ground : because Church interests are bound up in a closer reciprocal relation with the inmost feelings of the people, its religion and its morality. For this reason it appears to me of more weighty importance, that here there should be no precipitation ; that even necessary alterations in the constitution of the Church should be delayed, until the political balance of the country be more firmly establisht, and in consequence men's minds be again recovered to a calmer and more collected state.

We cannot overlook the fact, that the existing oppositions to the Church, the palæologian as well as the neologian, have grown up in open warfare with the old State : that for this very reason

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