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royal manner in advance. Besides, his sir ? 'tis doubtless a fair land to live in: travels in Europe have made him much commend me to your worthy father, whose the superior of those country-bred youths relatives in England here have done me and damsels. He has seen life and is a

many gracious acts of kindness.” But if deep philosopher. He has long since learn again in art and literature his parts shone ed to look upon human life as a comedy with great brilliance, in all matters conwhere A.'s business is to make love to the nected with dress his merits entitled him wife of B., and where clearing out the to the praise due to a great genius. Here pockets of C. at cards, is the most rational he was Sir Oracle: when he opened his employment to which D. can dedicate his mouth, no one could speak, much less time and talents. His religious opinions controvert him. Ile was learned in cosare not decided in their character, but he tume, as a great scholar is in languages or is rather inclined to think the Established philosophy. He would hold forth on the Church what we moderns call a hum subject to admiring audiences for hoursbug :-an opinion, however, which, be it flowing on serenely master of his subject said to the credit of his common sense, he and triumphing in the superiority his has far too much tact to advance in the knowledge of the subject gave him over presence of his Church of England sire. the barbarian inhabitants of the Colony, He has not yet forgotten the unpleasant What a barbarous place Virginia was! feelings he experienced some years since The men still wore the sword-belt over the when the gold-headed cane was applied coat, and hanging down on the left side vigorously to his shoulders by the irate instead of underneath, and covered ur Squire. He preserves, therefore, a politic from view. Unfortunate provincials! he silence on the subject of religion, and goes felt no contempt for one guilty of such a willingly to church, where, lounging in the thing: he pitied him!. Some of the wovelvet-cushioned pew, he amuses himself men still raised those preposterous towers by staring out of countenance the young of curls upon their heads gone out of damsels from the neighborhood who are fashion at least a month ago, and wore criticising under cover of their silken no hoops, now universally used by the hoods, the returned traveller's appear fair dames of London.

Poor country ance:-or, tired of this, composes himself girls !--they would be the laughter and in a graceful attitude to quiet sleep, lulled ironical delight of London gallants and pleasantly by Parson Tythetobacco's beauties. If ever Master Ilopeful dedidrowsy homilies.

cates himself to a great object in life it But if Master Hopeful's opinions on Re will be reform in the barbarian costume ligion were undefined, which sprung na of his countrymen and women:-and as turally from his never having thought the first step in this elevated enterprise, upon the subject, his criticisms on dress he shows them in his own person what and fashion, literature and art, displayed a gentleman of fashion and distinction the knowledge of a master. In art, he looks like. He is a model worthy of imiwas an adept: he could talk of “color tation. Look at him! He wears a powing" and "effect," "interiors” and “per dered peruke which falls down in a queue spective" by the hour : he approved uncon behind, two feet long, and is tied with a ditionally of Sir Godfrey Kneller's style long orange-colored ribbon. His cheeks, in portrait-painting, and was reported to gently rubbed by the “drop curls” of the have once descended to a favorable criti wig, are slightly rouged, a fashion just cism of some comic sketches shown to him imported, and are as rosy and feminineprivately by a young painter of the name looking, contrasted with the aristocratic of Hogarth. If you could believe him, whiteness of the forehead, as those of a he had been hand in glove with all the young girl. His lace is Flanders or Point literary men of the Town, and he threw de Venise, of marvellous fineness and as out at times mysterious intimations that yellow as saffron: his vest is gold-flowerthe finest papers in the “Spectator” were ed velvet: his coat heavy with embroidery by no less a personage than himself. Joe and with ample cuffs which turn back to Addison, and Dick Steele, as he called the elbow, and are stiff with ornaments them with an easy, careless familiarity, all worked in silver thread: his hands are were his fast friends; the three were in cased in delicate fringed gloves, and not separable night and morning, he said, and seldom hold a small fashionable muff of this was so far true that they met often in leopard skin: his pantaloons are of blue the Play-house, where jovial Sir Richard satin, and his scarlet silk stockings are had once borrowed ten guineas of him, held up by red velvet garters, clasped and serene Mr. Joseph Addison had said with diamond buckles. Add Spanish leaon one occasion to him : “From Virginia, ther shoes with heels two or three inches

VOL. III.-18

The Cachu-Ha Giniry.

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toe eksily ing from the earliest ages of the world:

omæ furhr scattered, these youths were

dombtful, so completely had they disguised struadh Century "men sain" Belore, their very sex was

merr plain from this their manhood with those curls, and cheek amborry claser that colorings and ladies' muffs; that all habitsof the youngsqui passed away, soon, and they took their

places assturdy country gentlemen; honest radna He does not attend planters with hard muscles and strong

non 7 air sarely, visits the digestions ; ruddy faces, not red with Ar and considers for-hunting rouge but exercise ; with “ plantation Aunstled in the pursuits and igno- came to chat with them over their wine;

sament only fither country gentle talk" in abundance, when their neighbors parar the deaths of good society. He and a decided propensity for sitting in their

brwd in had in the morning takes great dining rooms as solemn Justices, purane at the breakfast-table when the factors; and presiding “with beard of

the hours to dress and makes his ap- and committing trespassers or other malense of the morld are getting ready to go w diner: He takes snuff from a beautiJu smul-bor with a picture on the lid, which had better not be spoken of further, and applies the aromatic dust to his nostrils with a delicate grace, which displays splendid London circle, which had sent the diamond rings upon his fingers to the best advantage: he does not like snuff, with such violence that his, peruke be and never partakes of it without sneezing Virginia. He took off deliberately his the London gallants and literary men, to

comes a wry. But it is the fashion among smear the upper lip with it-it looks critiPlantation without his snuff-box and narcal and knowing ! Ile never visits Middle row-edged cocked hat, with its bright feather, and small muff' such as the ladies joyously; and nourished, in full force and usod. He salutes his Lordship the GoPernor with ease and politeness, and will with some young damsel whose dress and

even dance a gavotte or minuet if he meets taste; though his oft-expressed opinion of style of conversation please his critical the minuet is not favorable to the claims with much grace and ease, as he handles gant, however, as his father was; and if the gracefully and with ease the small sword. education. In addition to all these attrac

T'hese things are a part of his superior tions and accomplishments, the youthful casion, the young man points to the porhope of his house plays well—and deep; often sitting up all night at tictac with his admiring friends, and rising next morning or afternoon with empty or full pockets, and that buzzing in the ears and swimming of the head which even the best Rhenish and Claret, taken in excess, are apt to visit on their votaries. the difference between himself and his however, to be said, that these follies did

true of them than contracter
manly. That was the f
whole race, the dark sha.
the shadow which hist
gins to speak, not st
endeavor to remove.

But to leave th: and pass on.

The Virginia gentlem: est, and suggesti er rose with ploughmanlik his brightfac mounting h tour of his tle army at their bacco 1:

formal cut” at county courts, and laying

down the law there dictatorially; their Overse gloss!

pompous, wordy discourses "full of wise horse

saws and modern instances." Alas! the wel

young blade soon became recreant to that him forth like a missionary, to make civilized Christians of the barbarians of Spanish leather slippers, and donned his father's old serviceable shoes, which he “stood in” thenceforth as the head of the house. Abjuring his former skepticism, he became an intolerant advocate and upholder of the union between Church and State; rode, to cover with his neighbors vigor, that good old English contempt for coinmon people which had been taught him as an article of his Creed of Gentleman.

Master Hopeful in the third generation runs the same course, except that Virgi

nia has now a college of its own, and he does Still he dances visit . IIe as

old gentleman, with fatherly seriousness, takes him to task for the heavy drains on

purse at cards octrait of a gay gallant on the wall, whose elderly original now stands before him, and asks with great interest the names of the chief wits and beauties of the time of good Queen Anne. But he, in turn, forswears his old companions, and horseracing and revelling, and settles down

the same sturdy planter, with the same But enough of young Master Hopeful: creed of gentleman but now spoken of.

Then comes the Revolution, and the brave sturdy sire is very plain.

It remains, worthies rising everywhere like a single

man against the oppression of England." not very long survive the return of the These were the men who set in motion English-educated youths to their colonial the ball of the Revolution, and ever prohomes. They were mere wild oats, such pelled it onward with their stalwart as young men have been engaged in sow shoulders, who poured out their blood as

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of that divertisement.

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freely as they gave their means; who, hrowing aside all affection, as all fear for England, risked every thing in life, and gained by that devotion-what?

For us many things ; and for themselves—what for their great self-sacrificing patriotism they deserve—a charitable view of their faults and failings. Not a concealment of their faults-not silence when after speaking of the bright portions of the picture, the shadows come to be adverted to in their turn. History based upon such thcory were a mere party pamphlet, a mockery of what it should be. But at least we need not dwell bitterly on that conspicuous weakness, any more than on their religious intolerance, and

other narrow views of life and government. It was the fault as much of their fathers and the times, as of themselves. Dead and gone long ago, they may stiil speak to us from thie dust, and teach us many noble precepts—as fidelity to the land, self-sacrificing patriotism, honesty in all things. Americans of the present day and hour are not pure enough to turn from such precepts, thanking God they are not as those men. Let the world take the lesson which those dead lives give it, thankfully; let it admire that great vigorous past wherever it is possible

-not seek to drag it down, rather endeavor to rise up superior to it.

MEN OF CHARACTER.

Character is what involuntarily comnize in an individual than character; and mands respect. It implies something more we hardly know of any thing, so palpable than great capacity and great learning. to the senses, that is so hard to define It is what makes itself felt, whether its clearly. It is much easier to tell who owner be clothed in rags, or in purple and have, and who have it not, than what it fine linen. It is sometimes associated is. Great intellect alone, does not give it, with vanity, but generally separated from nor great intellect combined with great it. Pride and self-reliance almost always moral worth. Goldsmith was almost accompany it. Its possessor is not easily wholly devoid of it; Bacon, Rousseau, moved by either censure or applause, and and Sheridan, had but very little of it; is utterly indifferent to what Mrs. Grundy Bolingbroke, Burke, and Pitt, a good deal. will say. He is not elated by little disChesterfield, the “perfect gentleman,” and tinctions and honors that may be conferDr. Johnson, the “respectable Hottentot,” red upon him, and cares nothing for the both had a large share of it. Bonaparte loss of them: Character must be associathad much more genius than Frederick the ed with great firmness and decision, and Great; but, as we think, less character. the man who has it will not be turned The Duke of Marlborough had a fair share from his course by any amount of abuse, of it, but very much less than his extra

ridicule, or

“paper bullets of the brain." ordinary wife. The Tudors all had a good "My people and 1,” said Frederick the deal of it; the Stuarts were all wanting Great,“ have come to an agreement which in it. Cæsar had it in an almost unpre

satisfies us both. They are to say what cedented degree ; Brutus and Cicero had they please, and I am to do what I please.” but little, especially the latter. The words And he suffered all sorts of lampoons and Shakspeare puts into the mouth of Cæsar, satires to be written upon him. Even the give an imperfect idea of it.

terrible sneers of Voltaire, when directed against him after their quarrel

, he suffered "I could be well moved, if I were as you:

to be sold by the booksellers, in his own If I could pray to move, prayers would movo me;

city, with impunity. Bonaparte, on the But I am constant as the Northern Star, Or whose true fixed and resting quality,

contrary, was cut to the quick by the There is no fellow in the firmament.

newspaper attacks of the English press The skies are painted with unnumbered sparks; upon him, and would suffer no jest at his They are all fire, and every one doth shine; expense to be published in his own kingBut there's but one in all doth hold his place: dom. So in the world. 'Tis furnished well with men,

The man who has character must be And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive; Yet, in the number, I do know but one

independent, fearless, and discriminating That unassailablo holds on his rank

in his judgment. He is not influenced Unshaked of motion."

by the position a man holds, or the clothes

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high, which enable him to assume easily ing from the earliest ages of the world: the fashionable tiptoe attitude, and the once fairly scattered, these youths were social Adonis of the Eighteenth Century men again.” Before, their very sex was

doubtful, so completely had they disguised Ilis costume, it is very plain from this their manhood with those curls, and cheek sketch, does not resemble very closely that colorings, and ladies' muffs ; that all of his father; the habits of the young squire passed away soon, and they took their differ from those of his father in a man places as sturdy country gentlemen; honest ner no less striking. He does not attend planters with hard muscles and strong to plantation affairs, rarely visits the digestions; ruddy faces, not red with county courts, and considers fox-hunting rouge but exercise ; with plantation an amusement only fit for country gentle talk” in abundance, when their neighbors men, unskilled in the pursuits, and igno came to chat with them over their wine; rant of the delights of good society. He and a decided propensity for sitting in their dawdles in bed in the morning, takes great dining rooms as solemn Justices, three hours to dress, and makes his ap and committing trespassers or other malepearance at the breakfast-table when the factors; and presiding " with beard of rest of the world are getting ready to go formal cut” at county courts, and laying to dinner. He takes snuff from a beauti down the law there dictatorially; their ful snuff-box with a picture on the lid, pompous, wordy discourses "full of wise which had better not be spoken of further, saws and modern instances.” Alas! the and applies the aromatic dust to his nos young blade soon became recreant to that trils with a delicate grace, which displays splendid London circle, which had sent the diamond rings upon his fingers to the him forth like a missionary, to make best advantage: he does not like snuff, civilized Christians of the barbarians of and never partakes of it without sneezing Virginia. He took off deliberately his with such violence that his peruke be Spanish leather slippers, and donned his comes awry. But it is the fashion among father's old serviceable shoes, which he the London gallants and literary men, to “stood in" thenceforth as the head of the smear the upper lip with it-it looks criti house. Abjuring his former skepticism, cal and knowing. Ile never visits Middle he became an intolerant advocate and upPlantation without his snuff-box and nar holder of the union between Church and row-edged cocked hat, with its bright fea State; rode, to cover with his neighbors ther, and small muff such as the ladies joyously; and nourished, in full force and used. He salutes his Lordship the Go vigor, that good old English contempt for vernor with ease and politeness, and will common people which had been taught even dance a gavotte or minuet if he meets him as an article of his Creed of Gentlewith some young damsel whose dress and style of conversation please his critical Master Hopeful in the third generation taste; though his oft-expressed opinion of runs the same course, except that Virgithe minuet is not favorable to the claims nia has now a college of its own, and he does of that divertisement. Still he dances not visit England. He is quite as extravawith much grace and ease, as he handles gant, however, as his father was; and if the gracefully and with ease the small sword. old gentleman, with fatherly seriousness, These things are a part of his superior takes him to task for the heavy drains on education. In addition to all these attrac the paternal purse his losses at cards octions and accomplishments, the youthful casion, the young man points to the porhope of his house plays well—and deep; trait of a gay gallant on the wall

, whose often sitting up all night at tictac with elderly original now stands before him, his admiring friends, and rising next and asks with great interest the names of morning or afternoon with empty or full the chief wits and beauties of the time of pockets, and that buzzing in the ears and good Queen Anne. But he, in turn, forswimming of the head which even the best swears his old companions, and horseRhenish and Claret, taken in excess, are racing and revelling, and settles down apt to visit on their votaries.

the same sturdy planter, with the same But enough of young Master Hopeful: creed of gentleman but now spoken of. the difference between himself and his Then comes the Revolution, and the brave sturdy sire is very plain. It remains, worthies rising everywhere like a single however, to be said, that these follies diá man against the oppression of England. not very long survive the return of the These were the men who set in motion English educated youths to their colonial the ball of the Revolution, and ever prohomes. They were mere wild oats, such pelled it onward with their stalwart as young men have been engaged in sow shoulders, who poured out their blood as

man.

freely as they gave their means; who, throwing aside all affection, as all fear for England, risked every thing in life, and gained by that devotion-what?

For us many things ; and for themselves—what for their great self-sacrificing patriotism they deserve a charitable view of their faults and failings. Not a concealment of their faults-not silence when after speaking of the bright portions of the picture, the shadows come to be adverted to in their turn. History based upon such theory were a mere party pamphlet, a mockery of what it should be. But at least we need not dwell bitterly on that conspicuous weakness, any more than on their religious intolerance, and

other narrow views of life and government. It was the fault as much of their fathers and the times, as of themselves. Dead and gone long ago, they may stiil speak to us from thie dust, and teach us many noble precepts—as fidelity to the land, self-sacrificing patriotism, honesty in all things. Americans of the present day and hour are not pure enough to turn from such precepts, thanking God they are not as those men. Let the world take the lesson which those dead lives give it, thankfully; let it admire that great vigorous past wherever it is possible

-not seek to drag it down, rather endeavor to rise up superior to it.

MEN OF CHARACTER.

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Character is what involuntarily comnize in an individual than character; and mands respect. It implies something more we hardly know of any thing, so palpable than great capacity and great learning. to the senses, that is so hard to define It is what makes itself felt, whether its clearly. It is much easier to tell who owner be clothed in rags, or in purple and have, and who have it not, than what it fine linen. It is sometimes associated is. Great intellect alone, does not give it, with vanity, but generally separated from nor great intellect combined with great it. Pride and self-reliance almost always moral worth. Goldsmith was almost accompany it. Its possessor is not easily wholly devoid of it; Bacon, Rousseau, moved by either censure or applause, and and Sheridan, had but very little of it; is utterly indifferent to what Mrs. Grundy Bolingbroke, Burke, and Pitt, a good deal. will say. He is not elated by little disChesterfield, the “perfect gentleman,” and tinctions and honors that may be conferDr. Johnson, the “respectable Hottentot," red upon him, and cares nothing for the both had a large share of it. Bonaparte loss of them: Character must be associathad much more genius than Frederick the ed with great firmness and decision, and Great; but, as we think, less character. the man who has it will not be turned The Duke of Marlborough had a fair share from his course by any amount of abuse, of it, but very much less than his extra ridicule, or paper bullets of the brain.". ordinary wife. The Tudors all had a good “My people and I,” said Frederick the deal of it; the Stuarts were all wanting Great," have come to an agreement which in it. Cæsar had it in an almost unpre satisfies us both. They are to say what cedented degree ; Brutus and Cicero had they please, and I am to do what I please.” but little, especially the latter. The words And he suffered all sorts of lampoons and Shakspeare puts into the mouth of Cæsar, satires to be written upon him. Even the give an imperfect idea of it.

terrible sneers of Voltaire, when directed

against him after their quarrel, he suffered “I could be well moved, if I wero as yon:

to be sold by the booksellers, in his own If I could pray to move, prayers would movo me;

city, with impunity. Bonaparte, on the But I am constant as the Northern Star, Of whose true fixed and resting quality,

contrary, was cut to the quick by the There is no follow in the firmament.

newspaper attacks of the English press The skies are painted with unnumbered sparks; upon him, and would suffer no jest at his They are all fire, and every one doth shine; expense to be published in his own kingBut there's but one in all doth hold his place: dom. So in the world. "Tis furnished well with men,

The man who has character must be And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive; Yet, in the number, I do know but one

independent, fearless, and discriminating That anassailable holds on his rank

in his judgment. He is not influenced Unshaked of motion."

by the position a man holds, or the clothes

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