An Historical and Descriptive Guide to Warwick Castle, Beauchamp Chapel, Kenilworth Castle, Guy's Cliff, Stoneleigh Abbey, Charlecote Hall, Stratford, Coombe Abbey, and All Other Places of Interest in the Neighbourhood

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H.T. Cooke, 1851 - 275

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Strona 20 - Infirm of purpose! Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead Are but as pictures: 'tis the eye of childhood That fears a painted devil. If he do bleed, I'll gild the faces of the grooms withal, For it must seem their guilt.
Strona 18 - Methinks I should know you, and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is; and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For (as I am a man) I think this lady To be my child Cordelia.
Strona 16 - And hid his face ; through which his hollow eyne Lookt deadly dull, and stared as astound ; His raw-bone cheekes, through penurie and pine, Were shronke into his iawes, as he did never dine.
Strona 16 - Ere long they come where that same wicked wight His dwelling has, low in an hollow cave, Far underneath a craggy cliff ypight, Darke, dolefull, dreary, like a greedy grave, That still for carrion carcases doth crave : On top whereof ay dwelt the ghastly Owle, Shrieking his balefull note, which ever drave Far from that haunt all other chearefull fowle , And all about it wandring ghostes did wayle and howle.
Strona 2 - Good frend for Jesvs sake forbeare, To digg the dvst encloased heare ; Blese be ye. man yt. spares thes stones, And cvrst be he yt. moves my bones.
Strona 4 - Kenilworth Illustrated ; or, the History of the Castle, Priory, and Church of Kenilworth, with a description of their Present State.
Strona 69 - He gives us a peculiar cast of nature, which, though void of all grace, elegance, and simplicity, though it has nothing of that elevation and dignity which belongs to the grand style, yet, has that sort of dignity which belongs to savage and uncultivated nature : but what is most to be admired in him, is, the perfect correspondence which he observed between the subjects •which he chose and his manner of treating them. Every thing is of a piece : his Rocks, Trees, Sky, even to his handling, have...
Strona 81 - He looks up as if reflecting ; for, although his eye is directed towards the spectator, his mind is evidently fixed on his subject. The expression of the head is remarkably fine and spirited : he is dressed in black, with a white lace ruff and ruffles. The local tone of the flesh is reddish ; the execution careful. The whole bespeaks it to be the work of a clever painter, and it seems to me to be decidedly an original portrait. The ground is black.
Strona 133 - Austen, xi. Feb. 28 H. 6, doth covenant to cast and make an image of a man armed, of fine latten, garnished with certain ornaments, viz. with sword and dagger; with a garter; with a helme and crest under his head, and at his feet a bear musled, and a griffon, perfectly made of the finest latten, according to patterns; all which to be brought to Warwick and layd on the tombe...
Strona 133 - Austen, xi. Feb. 28. H. 6. doth covenant to cast and make an Image of a man armed, of fine Latten, garnished with certain ornaments, viz. with Sword and Dagger; with a Garter; with a Helme and Crest under his head, and at his feet a Bear musled, and a Griffon, perfectly made of the finest Latten, according to patterns...

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