The Works of Oliver Goldsmith: With a Life and Notes. ; Volume IV

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Creative Media Partners, LLC, 18 lip 2023 - 338

This collection brings together the most important works of Oliver Goldsmith, one of the greatest English writers of the 18th century. It includes his classic plays, such as She Stoops to Conquer and The Good-Natur'd Man, as well as his essays, poems, and novel The Vicar of Wakefield. The book also features a detailed biography of Goldsmith's life and career, and provides critical notes and commentary on his works.

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Informacje o autorze (2023)

As Samuel Johnson said in his famous epitaph on his Irish-born and educated friend, Goldsmith ornamented whatever he touched with his pen. A professional writer who died in his prime, Goldsmith wrote the best comedy of his day, She Stoops to Conquer (1773). Amongst a plethora of other fine works, he also wrote The Vicar of Wakefield (1766), which, despite major plot inconsistencies and the intrusion of poems, essays, tales, and lectures apparently foreign to its central concerns, remains one of the most engaging fictional works in English. One reason for its appeal is the character of the narrator, Dr. Primrose, who is at once a slightly absurd pedant, an impatient traditional father of teenagers, a Job-like figure heroically facing life's blows, and an alertly curious, helpful, loving person. Another reason is Goldsmith's own mixture of delight and amused condescension (analogous to, though not identical with, Laurence Sterne's in Tristram Shandy and Johnson's in Rasselas, both contemporaneous) as he looks at the vicar and his domestic group, fit representatives of a ludicrous but workable world. Never married and always facing financial problems, he died in London and was buried in Temple Churchyard.

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