Hermes; Or, A Philosophical Inqviry Concerning Vniversal Grammar

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F. Wingrave, 1806 - 442
 

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Strona 124 - Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices, to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive...
Strona 56 - So spake the cherub; and his grave rebuke, Severe in youthful beauty, added grace Invincible: abash'd the devil stood, And felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely; saw, and pined His loss: but chiefly to find here observed His lustre visibly impair'd; yet seem'd Undaunted. If I must contend...
Strona 14 - And chiefly thou, O Spirit, that dost prefer Before all temples th' upright heart and pure, Instruct me, for thou know'st; thou from the first Wast present and with mighty wings outspread Dove-like satst brooding on the vast abyss And mad'st it pregnant.
Strona 405 - Above the flight of Pegasean wing ! The meaning, not the name, I call ; for thou Nor of the Muses nine, nor on the top Of old Olympus dwell'st ; but...
Strona 425 - To be competently skilled in antient learning, is by no means a work of such insuperable pains. The very progress itself is attended with delight, and resembles a Journey through some pleasant Country, where every mile we advance, new charms arise. It is certainly as easy to be a Scholar, as a Gamester, or many other Characters equally illiberal and low. The same application, the same quantity of habit will fit us for one, as completely as for the other.
Strona 422 - ... with such a pregnant brevity, that in every sentence we seem to read a page. How exquisitely is this all performed in Greek ! Let those who imagine it may be done as well in another language, satisfy themselves, either by attempting to translate him, or by perusing his translations already made by men of learning.
Strona 408 - Our terms in polite literature prove, that this came from Greece ; our terms in music and painting, that these came from Italy ; our phrases in cookery and war, that we learnt these from the French; and our phrases in navigation, that we were taught by the Flemings and Low Duteh.
Strona 357 - would not be adequate to the purpose of signature, if it had not the power to retain, as well as to receive the impression, the same holds of the soul, with respect to sense and imagination. Sense is its receptive power ; imagination, its retentive. Had it sense without imagination, it would not be as wax, but as water, where, though all impressions are instantly made, yet as soon as they are made, they are instantly lost.
Strona 112 - There is nothing appears so clearly an object of the mind or intellect only as the future does, since we can find no place for its existence any where else: not but the same, if we consider, is equally true of the past — " "Well, co on — What stops the plockit?
Strona 417 - From considering the Romans let us pass to the Creeks. The Grecian Commonwealths, while they maintained their liberty, were the most heroic confederacy that ever existed. They were the politest, the bravest, and the wisest of men. In the short space of little more than a century, they became such statesmen, warriors, orators, historians, physicians, poets, critics, painters, sculptors, architects, and (last of all) philosophers, that one can hardly help considering that golden period, as a providential...

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