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The Oxford MSS. are a disappointing lot. Mr. ILLUSTRATIONS OF BISHOP PERCY'S Richard Morris pointed out to me the Corpus one

FOLIO MANUSCRIPT.-No. III. as the oldest and best (as it certainly is), though

“Shall never a man take my matter (or hatter ] in hond very imperfect. The Barlow 20, which another

Till I bee able to auenge my-selfe in Lond." friend thought the best, turns out to be so care

Eger and Grime, i. 370, 1. 497. lessly written in many places—having letters left

Is it not possible that “ hatter” is the right out, and such readings as cracchyng of" chekenys" word after all ? (chickens) for the scratching of " cheeks” by the

In the Promptorium Parvulorum the word mourners for Arcite's death—that after three tries "hatyr” or “hetere” is given as an equivalent at collation in different places, I gave up in to “ rent clothes " (and is the Anglo-Saxon hæter, disgust. The best MS. in the Bodleian I consider clothing, apparel (Bosworth), in no way connected to be Arch. Seld. B. 14, part in careless writing, with the next word — F.]; but in the charining the careful in a hand like the best of the British little poem, “How the goode wif thought hir Museum Sloane MSS. (1685), if my memory serve doughter,” 1. 23, the phrase occurs," Mekely hym me rightly. This Arch. Seld. B. 14 may perhaps answere and noght to haterlynge," * where the word go into the second class of “ Canterbury Tales”

plainly means worrying"; and in Bedfordshire MSS. All the other Oxford ones I should put in at the present day, "hattering,” is used for “hathe third and fourth classes, or lower, if lower ones rassing, " "tiring.” The people talk of a “hatare made. The Ashmole MS. 45 is a late paper tering life.” Might not then the original hatter one,

and contains only the Cook's Tale and Gamelyn of the MS. mean" care," " trouble,” or “worry' (with the Erle of Tolous, &c.) The two MS. copies

W. F. ROSE. of John Lane's dull continuation of the Squire's Tale contain copies of Chaucer's part of the tale : the date is 1630.

SIR JAMES MACKINTOSH.—The following letter The Hatton, Rawlinson, Holkham, Christ affords so amusing a picture of a boy-philosopher, Church, and Trinity MSS. are the ones that play and is so characteristic of its author, that it seems most tricks with the order of the Tales in this worthy of publication. It was written by Sir Table; and again the set of MSS. that misplace

James Mackintosh in his sixteenth year, when the Squire (V. 1), Merchant (IV. 2), and Group the banks of Loch Ness. His father, Captain VIII. (Second Nun and Canon's Yeoman), is by Mackintosh, was abroad with his regiment, and a far the largest.

F. J. FURNIVALL.

relative in Inverness (to whom the letter is ad3, Old Square, Lincoln's Inn, W.C., August 6, 1868. dressed) took charge of the boy, and superin

P.S.—The MS. which Sir Morton Peto now tended the management of the small paternal holds for a time with Chipstead Place, he has estate which Sir James was afterwards obliged to kindly allowed me to examine.

It proves to be sell. the Haistwell MS. marked by Tyrwhitt H A,

“ Clune, 18th Sep". 1781.

“ Dear Sir.-Tho' I have not ventured to express my and lent to him" by Edward Haistwell, Esq.' An extract from a sale catalogue pasted in the gards myself, yet the condescension with which you have

sentiments to you on anything of consequence that reMS. leads one to the conclusion that the MS. was treated my correspondence hitherto encourages me to sold by auction after Mr. Haistwell's death, and hope that you will not be offended at my proposing

some then probably bought by Mr. Perkins, the father

observations which have occurr'd to me with respect to of the present owner of Chipstead Place (near I am induced to this the more readily by the reflection

the economy of my education next winter at Aberdeen. Sevenoaks), which father formed the family li

that the facts which I intend to urge are of such a nature brary, and made the MSS. and books heirlooms. that they cannot be known to any person but those who The order of the Tales in this MS. is, as Tyrwhitt have experienced them. You doubtless remember, as I notes, the one which he settled as the right order, disturbance among the students. When the Professors and which I have followed in these Tables. The MS. has not the tale of Gamelyn, but a copy of tence of the motives which actuated me, they did it with

at that time express'd their opinion in their public senit on vellum, from MS. Laud K. 50, has been in- such remarkable bitterness as sufficiently indicated that serted between the two leaves of the Cook's Tale. the impressions which they had received were not the The MS. has lost its last leaf, containing part of

most farorable. If this were a place to enquire how they Chaucer's Retractation, and is of rather late date

came to form so extraordinary an opinion of one instance

rather of thoughtless than of deliberate criminality, persay 1440-50-going into the third (or perhaps haps it might be shown that it was entirely owing to a second) class of MSS. of the Tales.

misconception of the nature of the case in general, and Corrections for Table I.:-Add Gamelyn in I. of the circumstances that gave rise to this mistake might Harl. 1758, Royal 18 C II. and Lansdowne 851 ; and

with equal ease be pointed out. But, at any rate, whedele“ (no Prol.)” in Harl. 7333 I.

* The reading of the Lambeth and Trinity MSS. is, “And not as an attirling." See Babees Book, E.E.T.S.

p. 38.

ther just or unjust, it is submitted whether it may not Pliny:prove consequentially prejudicial to be under the tuition

“Mirantibus, tum magis fuisse miratores dixit, si of persons who entertain such sentiments, and whether it ipsum orantem audivissent; in calamitate testis ingens may not be of more advantage to me to change to the other factus inimici.” Hist. Nat. 1. vii. c. 30, ed. Paris, 1771, college, where the effects which a proper behaviour on my

t. iii. p. 124. part might have on the minds of the Professors are not clogged by so disagreeable a circumstance, where the

Philostratus : teachers are at least upon a footing, and where the con- Του δε ηθικού και Ροδίοις καλλιστην επίδειξιν εποιήveniency and cheapness of boarding are obviously and

σατο. αναγνούς γάρ ποτε δημοσία τον κατά Κτησιφώνconsiderably greater, to all which it may be added that there are several students who are in the same predica- τος, οι μεν εθαύμαζον όπως επί τοιούτω λόγω ηττήθη, ment as me, who have this design. These facts I have | και καθήπτοντο των Αθηναίων ως παρανομούντων. ο δε, presumed to state, not in support of any opinion of mine, | Ουκ άν, έφη, έθαυμάζετε, εί Δημοσθένους λέγοντας προς but merely for your information. Meantime I wait with | ταύτα ηκούσατε' ου μόνον ες έπαινον εχθρού καθιστάμενος, patience for your directions, which will meet the most

αλλά και τους δικαστές αφιείς αιτίας. . implicit deference and obedience on this as well as on ev'ry other subject, from one who is happy to subscribe

De Vitis Sophistarum, i. 19, (p. 510, ed. Lips. 1709). himself, dear Sir,

Plutarch, De Vitis Septem Oratorum, c. vi., is Your most grateful hue servt,

to the same effect. “ Jas. M'INTOSH.”

No doubt there are other versions, but does Addressed, “ Baillie John M‘Intosh, Inverness."

any warrant the word “monster”? Greek orators, The Bailie indorses it, “ Jamie Mackintosh, 18 Sep when opposed to each other, cared little for good tember, 1781.”

C.

manners, and, I believe, not much for truth; but ÆSCHINES ON DEMOSTHENES. — The following on this occasion Æschines, having read the speech is from an article in The Times of August 21, on in his best style, seems to have paid a generous sermons generally, and especially on those of tribute to the greatness of his adversary. Massillon :

FITZHOPKINS. “ Massillon hits right and left; whoever were the

Garrick Club. smaller victims, and whether they could or would resent

SIR EDWARD HOWARD, K.B., LORD HOWARD the chastisement, he spared not the chief, but still he rebuked him as a chief, and as an erring divinity. The

OF ESCRICK. - In the catalogue of “ Yorkshire Almighty had condescended and the course of the world Worthies,” whose portraits are now being exhad been changed, armies had retraced their steps and hibited in the National Exhibition of Works of hostile States had recovered their old borders, in order Art at Leeds, No. 3057 is described as — to administer a salutary check to the ambition, the worldliness, and even the erring thoughts of one man. The

“Howard, LORD, K.B. Married the heiress of Lord sinner rose in dignity at every step of the reproof; and

Knevit of Escrick. Created Baron Howard of Escrick, when that reproof is extended to all around, it is at least

1628. Acquired an infamous immortality by his bea great Court that appears, the functionaries are respected

trayal of the patriots Lord Russell and Algernon Sideven in their crimes, and the noble ladies, whatever is

ney. D. 1675." imputed or suspected, are at least worthy of the well

• (Contributed by) Sir REGINALD H. GRAHAM, Bart." turned rebuke. In its fiercest extreme, the invective, if Now, if this portrait represents the first Lord pointed, is still complimentary; and the object of it Howard of Escrick, who was so created in 1628, might delight to read the discourse to others, adding, and who died in 1675, it is clearly not that of the like the victim of Demosthenes' most famous barangue, "Oh, had you but heard the monster himself deliver the Lord Howard who bore testimony at the trials of speech!!"

Russell and Sidney in 1683. The Lord Howard I have looked into what are supposed to be the

of that day was his younger son William, who best authorities for this story, and I do not find

succeeded his brother Thomas as the third Lord that Æschines called Demosthenes a “monster

Howard of Escrick in 1678, and died in 1694. on that occasion. Cicero says:

The error is more note-worthy, because it has "Quo mihi etiam melius illud ab Æschine dictum videri evidently been derived from Sir B. Burke's Dorsolet, qui cum propter ignominiam judicii cessisset

mant and Extinct Peerages, in which, at p. 288, it Athenis et se Rhodum contulisset, rogatus a Rhodiis, is said of Edward, first Lord Howard of Escrick : legisse fertur orationem illam egregiam, quam in Clesi. “ This nobleman acquired an infamous immorphontem contra Demosthenem dixerat, qua perlecta tality by his betrayal of the celebrated patriots, petitum est ab eo postridie, ut legeret illam etiam quæ Lord Russell and Ålgernon Sidney.” But all the erat contra a Demosthene pro Ctesiphonte edita ; quam

J. G. N. cum suavissima et maxima voce legisset, admirantibus Peerages agree that he died in 1675. omnibus, 'Quanto,' inquit, ‘magis admiramini, si audissetis ipsum."" De Oratore, 1. iii

. c. 56, ed. Geneva, 1743, is a very comprehensive, and in the main a very

THACKERAY'S “BATTLE OF LIMERICK.”—There t. i. p. 313. Quinctilian:

meritorious, selection of English poems published

at New York under the title of The Household * Ideoque ipse tam diligenter apud Andronicum hypo- Book of English Poetry, and edited by Mr. C. A. non immerito Æschines dixisse videtur, . Quid si ipsum Dana – I presume the Under-secretary of the War audivisses.'"-Instit. Orat, 1. xi, c. 3.

Department. In the eleventh edition (it is not

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in the third, which is the only other I have seen), OLD LATIN Song,
Thackeray's “ Battle of Limerick” is reprinted “ Gaudeamus igitur, juvenes dum sumus,
with the trifling alteration I am about to set forth. Gaudeamus igitur, juvenes dum sumus ;
This humorous effusion, as most people are aware,

Absoluta juventute, in molesta senectute,

Nos habebit humus. was prompted by a riot which took place in

Nos habebit humus. Limerick on occasion of a public entertainment

“ Ubi sunt qui ante nos in mundo fuere ? given to the chiefs of the Young Ireland party

Ubi sunt, etc. Smith O'Brien, John Mitchel, and Meagher of Transeas ad superos, abeas ad inferos, the sword.” The behaviour of Meagher “of the

Hos si vis videre, sword” is thus adverted to:

Hos, etc. • Cut down the bloody horde!'

" Vita nostra brevis est, brevi finietur. Says Meagher of the sword;

Vita nostra, etc. • This conduct would disgrace any blackamore.'

Mors venit velociter, rapit nos atrociter,
But the best use Tommy made

Neminem veretur.
Of his famous battle-blade

Neminem, etc.
Was to cut his own stick from the Shannon shore." " Accipe vitreolum boni Bacchi, bibe.

Accipe, etc. "Tommy," however, subsequently took up his

Bibe salutiferum, bibe plenum poculum, abode in the United States, where he became a

Ad sanitatem vitæ. general of volunteers; and Mr. Dana, preferring

Ad sanitatem vitæ." his reputation to Thackeray's, coolly alters the

F. C. H. obnoxious stanza as follows: But millions were arrayed,

Queries. So he shaythed his battle-blade, Rethrayting undismayed from the Shannon shore.” “ DICTIONARY OF ARTISTS OF THE ENGLISH I think this emendation is sufficiently remark

SCHOOL: PAINTERS, SCULPTORS, ARCHI

TECTS, ENGRAVERS, AND ORNAMENTISTS." able to be embalmed in “N. & Q.” R. GARNETT.

I have been for several years occupied in colTHE “ANCRE HOTEL AT Oucuy, SWITZER, lecting materials for this work, and the MSS. are LAND. —This ancient hostelrie, where Byron used ready to put into the printer's hands. My reto resort, and where he wrote “The Prisoner of searches have reached all the ordinary sources of Chillon," is undergoing a complete restoration, information on the subject of art and artists, and or rather destruction. When it was the abode of in many out-of-the-way places I have picked up Byron, and in later times of Shelley and Eugène valuable facts, and have also received some useful Sue, it was held by the Rouget family; but it

help from my

friends. has lately passed into other hands. The rooms

But much more might be done ; much more that Byron always occupied were carefully kept gleaned from a nearly-forgotten past with the in their original state by the Rougets, and the late assistance of “N. & Q.”: and I would willingly M. Louis Rouget used to have a pride in pointing revise my laborious work if I could be spared out where Byron was in the habít of writing, and from time to time a corner to consult its readers. also in telling of mountain and lake adventures The chief facts I am anxious to supply are the when he, a mere boy, used to be the poet's do- correct Christian names (so necessary for identimestic. Byron's rooms have been all swept away, fication); the exact places and dates of birth and and even a cut inscription made by Byron himself death; the parentage and pupillage, with any on the stone window-sill has been erased by the matters essentially identified with the artist and chisel of the mason. Shelley occupied the same

his art, or any hints where information not ordisuite of rooms, he always refusing other apart- narily accessible may be found. ments; they were also the choice of Eugène Sue.

To begin with the beginning, I should be grateThe exterior as well as the interior of the Ancre ful for any help.in respect to has been changed. The house is no longer a Swiss chateau, but a flashy-looking modern hotel

. popular at the commencement of the present century, and

ALKEN, S.-An aqua-tint engraver, whose works were The new proprietor was cautioned against de- who carried the art to great perfection. stroying the Byron and Shelley rooms, and told ALLEN, ANDREW.- Portrait-painter. He practised with how thousands of pilgrims from all countries had some repute in Edinburgh about 1730. visited the Ancre expressly to see them. It was

Allex, J., of Manchester and later of Birmingham.-of no avail; he had never heard of the gentlemen, occasional exhibitor in London from 1802 to 1820. He

Had a local reputation as a portrait-painter, and was an and he should do as his architect advised! The also produced some genre subjects. Guide-books state that “Byron wrote · The Pri. ALLEN, THOMAS.- Marine-painter. Several of his soner of Chillon' at the Anchor, and that his works about the middle of the last century are engraved rooms are carefully preserved.". They may now

by Canot. state that the old Ancre and Byron's rooms no

ANDERSON, William. - Born in Scotland. A ship

wright. Practised in London. Painted river-scenes, longer exist.

S. JACKSON.

calms, shipping, and boats. He died some time early in

the present century. His works are well known, and are “ Dixon Notes; or, Authentic particulars of the several esteemed for their simple quiet truth.

Families of Dixon who have borne a chief ermine, and ANSELL, CHARI.ES.-An animal-painter, who drew the are presumed to have derived from a common ancestor.” horse well, and painted domestic subjects with much excellence. His « Death of a Race-horse”. was published In furtherance of this object I will be obliged in six plates, and several of his works are engraved. He if any reader of "N. & Q."

will kindly point out was an exhibitor at the Royal Academy soon after its the immediate lineage of Dean Bright, whose foundation. exhibited some good subject pictures at the British In-Dixon, both of the parish of Leeds, co. York. ANNESLEY, Mrs.-A clever amateur, who about 1820 daughter and granddaughter were respectively the

wife of the Rev. Samuel Wright and Mr. John stitution.

ARNOLD, SAMUEL JAMES. -Painted some of the early Dean Bright was probably related to the Rev. panoramas with much skill.

John Bright, M.A., Vicar of Sheffield (uncle to ARTAUD, WILLIAM. – Gained the gold medal of the Sir John Bright of Badsworth, Bart.), whose Royal Academy for a painting

from Paradise Lost in daughter Ruth was the second wife of Mr. Thomas ally history, from that year up to 1822. The vigorously Dixon, mayor of Leeds in 1671 and 1693, but I painted characteristic portrait of Dr. Kippis, now ex- have failed to find out the family connection. hibited without the artist's name at the South Kensing

R. W. Dixon. ton Museuin, is by his hand.

Seaton-Carew, co. Durham.
ASHBY, H.-Portrait.painter. In 1794 and up to 1821
he exhibited portraits, with some genre pictures, at the
Academy, and in the latter year was living at Mitcbam.

CREATURE, A BAPTISMAL NAME.—Dearn, in bis Ashford, WILLIAM.-Landscape-painter. Practised Weald of Kent, says that in the registers of Śtapleat Dublin, where his works were much esteemed; but in hurst parish occur entries of the baptisms of inthe latter part of his life he had retired from practice. In fants before birth by the appellations of Creatures. 1821 he was chosen President of the Royal Hibernian He adds that it is probable that this name was Academy, which was then incorporated, and died about changed either at or before confirmation, although 1830 near Dublin.

ATKINSON, JOHN AUGUSTUS.- A clever draftsman and there is an instance in 1578 of a woman being painter, who passed many years of his life in Russia, and married by her baptismal name of Creature. Was published several works in illustration of the victories, the Christian or first name of Creature generally customs, and costume of the Russians. He was living in bestowed upon the baptism of an unborn child ? 1829. ATTWOLD, R.-A draftsman and engraver of the middle

EDWARD J. Wood. of the last century, of whom no particulars appear to be known, and whose work has been attributed to Hogarth.

DROGHEDA PARISH REGISTER.-One of the reAUSTIN, Paul. – Engraved landscape, after several gisters of St. Peter's parish, Drogheda, in the masters. Practised in London about 1765-80.

diocese of Armagh, has been for some years past, SAM. REDGRAVE.

and is at present, in the Office of Arms, Dublin 17, Hyde Park Gate, Kensington, W.

Castle. It contains many entries of baptisms, [Those of our correspondents who can supply the information required by Mr. REDGRAVE will be kind marriages, and burials, from 1747 to 1772, and enough to address their replies to that gentleman. –Ed.] though safe, is certainly not (as the law stands) in

the right depository. May I ask why it has not BIBLIOTHECA NORTHANTONENSIS.

been claimed by, and restored to, its lawful cusof

todian, the vicar of St. Peter's ? I am interested the readers of "N. & Q." refer me to a copy in in the matter as a member of a family connected any public or private library, or furnish me with with Drogheda for several generations. further particulars, of the exceedingly rare and

ABHBA. curious poetical broadside as quoted below:

“ An answer to a Papisticall Byll cast in the streetes SIR PATRICK DRUMMOND. I am desirous to of Northampton and brought before the Judges at the last obtain any particulars of Sir Patrick Drummond, Syses, 1570. Imprinted at London by John Awdely, 1570." who was " Conservator in Holland” about the According to Ritson it was written by T. Knell,

year 1645, as stated in the Autobiography of jun., who was perhaps no other than the cele

Lady Ilalkett. And what was the nature of the brated comic actor contemporary with Tarlton.

post which is designated as “Conservator in HolThe entry in the “Registers of the Stationers' land”?

J. G. N. Company” is as follows: “ 1570. Rd of John awdelay, for his lycense for prynt

Francis I.- I purchased in London, many years inge of a ballett, an answere to a papest byll in North- ago, a curious French print representing Le Roi ampton

iiija." Chevalier with the attributes of some of the A copy was sold in Heber's Library, Part IV., heathen deities enumerated in the following No. 385.

John TAYLOR. Northampton.

“ Francoys en guerre est vn Mars furieux, DR. GEORGE BRIGHT, DEAN OF Sr. ASAPH, En paix Minerve & Diane à la chasse, 1689-1696. – I am preparing to print for private

A bien parler Mercure copieux, circulation

A bien aymer vray Amour plein de grâce.

Can any

verses:

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