The Triune God: Systematics

Przednia okładka
University of Toronto Press, 1 sty 1988 - 823
0 Recenzje
Nie weryfikujemy opinii, ale staramy się wykrywać i usuwać fałszywe treści

Buried for more than forty years in a Latin text written for seminarians at the Gregorian University in Rome, Bernard Lonergan's important work on systematic theology, De Deo Trino: Pars systematica, is presented here for the first time in a facing-page edition that includes the original Latin along with a precise English translation. De Deo Trino, or The Triune God, the second part of which is the pars systematica, continues a particular strand in trinitarian theology, namely, the tradition that appeals to a psychological analogy for understanding trinitarian processions and relations.

The psychological analogy dates back to St Augustine but was significantly developed by St Thomas Aquinas. Lonergan advances it to a new level of understanding by bringing to it his extensive exploration of cognitional theory and deliberative process. Suggestions for a further development of the analogy appear in Lonergan's late work, but these cannot be fully comprehended and implemented without the background provided in this volume. With this definitive translated edition, one of the masterpieces of systematic theology, will at last be available to contemporary scholars.

Buried for more than forty years in a Latin text written for seminarian students at the Gregorian University in Rome, Bernard Lonergan's 1964 masterpiece of systematic-theological writing, De Deo trino: Pars systematica, is only now being published in an edition that includes the original Latin along with an exact and literal translation. De Deo trino , or The Triune God, is the third great installment on one particular strand in trinitarian theology, namely, the tradition that appeals to a psychological analogy for understanding trinitarian processions and relations.

The analogy dates back to St Augustine but was significantly developed by St Thomas Aquinas. Lonergan advances it to a new level of sophistication by rooting it in his own highly nuanced cognitional theory and in his early position on decision and love. Suggestions for a further development of the analogy appear in Lonergan's late work, but these cannot be understood and implemented without working through this volume. This is truly one of the great masterpieces in the history of systematic theology, perhaps even the greatest of all time.

Bernard Lonergan (1904-1984), a professor of theology, taught at Regis College, Harvard University, and Boston College. An established author known for his Insight and Method in Theology, Lonergan received numerous honorary doctorates, was a Companion of the Order of Canada in 1971 and was named as an original members of the International Theological Commission by Pope Paul VI.

Z wnętrza książki

Co mówią ludzie - Napisz recenzję

Nie znaleziono żadnych recenzji w standardowych lokalizacjach.

Spis treści

De Fine Ordine Modo Dicendi
6
The Goal the Order and the Manner of Speaking
7
De Divinis Processionibus Analogice
124
An Analogical Conception of the Divine Processions
125
The divine processions which are processions according
145
Two and only two divine processions can be conceived through
181
Generation in the strict sense of the term is implied by the
189
Is our act of understanding different from our inner word?
203
Immanent Operation
531
The Words Action and Operation
535
Act of What Is Complete and Act of What Is Incomplete
537
Nature
539
To Receive Passion
541
Action poiesis jactio
543
Vital Act
547
Application to the Act of Understanding
553

Is the beloved in the lover constituted by love or produced
219
De Relationibus Divinis Realibus
230
The Real Divine Relations
231
Is it by a major or a minor conceptual distinction that the divine
295
De Divinis Personis In Se Consideratis
306
The Divine Persons Considered in Themselves
307
Quaenam sit ratio personae qua divinae
338
Quemadmodum persona se habeat ad incommunicabili
344
Dividuntur attributa Patris Filii et Spiritus Sancti
350
Relationes divinae reales personas divinas constituunt
362
Actus notionales sunt naturales conscii intellectuales
368
De Divinis Personis Inter Se Comparatis
376
The Divine Persons in Relation to One Another
377
Do the divine persons say to one another I and You?
397
The Father the Son and the Holy Spirit dwell within
413
Perfection has two formalities The first is grounded upon act
421
De Divinis Missionibus
436
The Divine Missions
437
Is it by way of love that the divine persons are in the just and dwell in them?
501
Although the indwelling of the divine persons exists more in acts and is better known in acts still it is constituted through the state of grace
513
Epilogus
522
Epilogue
523
Appendices
527
De Actu Intelligendi
558
The Act of Understanding
559
The Notion of Object
561
The Object of the Intellect as End and Term
563
The Object That Moves the Intellect
567
Passages in St Thomas on the Object as Mover
569
Quiddity
577
Various Meanings of Species
587
The Necessity for the Word
597
Appendix IIA
602
Appendix 2A
603
Intellectual Emanation
609
Spiration
615
The Procession of Love
621
Ex Imagine Ad Exemplar Aeternum
626
From the Image to the Eternal Exemplar
627
Implications of the Analogy with Respect to God
631
De Relationibus
686
Relations
687
Letter to Fr Gerard Smith S J
739
Divinarum Personarum
742
Prawa autorskie

Inne wydania - Wyświetl wszystko

Kluczowe wyrazy i wyrażenia

Informacje o autorze (1988)

H. Daniel Monsour is a research assistant with the Lonergan Research Institute or Regis College at the University of Toronto.

Informacje bibliograficzne