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PRINTED BY JOHN BROWN, ANCHOR CLOSE,

FOR THE PROPRIETORS,
AND SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

1816,

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N E R

N E R NEREIS, in zoology, a genus of animals be- pear as if on fire all around. Their bodies are fo

longing to the order of vermes mollusca. The minute ag to elude examination by the naked eye. body is oblong, linear, and fitted for creeping; Šee fig.s. It is sometimes called nereis phospheit is furnished with lateral pencilled tentácula. rans; and is thus described by Griselin : The There are 11 fpecies, of which the most remark- head is roundish and fat, and the mouth acumiable are the five following:

nated. The two horns or feelers are short and 1. NEREIS CÆRULEA, the blue nereis, inhabits subulated. The eyes are prominent, and placed the ocean; where it destroys the serpulæ and on each side the head. The body is composed teredines. See Plate CCXLVI, fig. 1.

of about 23 segments or joints, which are much 2. NEREIS CIRROSA, the waving nereis. See less nearer the tail than at the head. These fegfig. 2. The body is red, lumbriciform, with 65 ments on both sides the animal all end in a short notches, furnished on both sides with two rows conical apex, out of which proceeds a little bunof bristles. At each side of the head ten filaments, dle of hairs; from under these bundles the feet at the fides of the mouth many, twice as long grow in the form of small flexile subulated segas the former. It dwells in Norway, on rocks ments deflitute of any thing like claws. It is at the bottom of the sea. It vomits a red liquor, scarcelý two lines long, is quite pellucid, and its with which it tinges the water.

colour is that of water green. They are found 3. NEREIS GIGANTÆA, the giant nereis, is a pe- upon all kinds of marine plants; but they often culiar fpecies of those large worms that make leave them and are found upon the surface of the their way into decayed piles driven down into the water: they are frequent at all seasons, but espesea, which they bore through and feed upon, cially in summer before stormy weather, when whence they are called sea worms. From head they are more agitated and more luminous. to tail they are beset on either side with small tufts Their numbers, and wonderful agility, added to terminating in three points; which are like the their pellucid and shining quality, do not a little fine bair pencils used by painters, and composed contribute to their illuminating the sea, for myof shining bristles of various colours. The upper riads of those animalculæ may be contained part of the body in this worm is all over-covered in the portion of a small cup of sea. water. Innuwith small hairs. The rings of which it is formed merable quantities of them lodge in the cavities are closely pressed together, and yield to the of the scales of fishes, and to them probably do touch. The 3 rows of small tufts serve instead of the fishes owe their noctilucous quality. “I have feet, which it uses as fish do their fins. See fig 3. observed with great attention (says Bárbut') a fish

4. NEREIS LACUSTRIS, the bog nereis. The just caught out of the sea, whose body was albody of the size of a hog's short bristles, transpa- most covered with them, and have examined them rent, as it were articulated, and on either ide in the dark: they twist and curl themselves with at every articulation provided with a short seta. amazing agility, but foon retire out of our conceous foot; interiorly it seems to confift in a man- tracted fight; probably their glittering numbers net of oval-shaped articulations, and a back formed dazzling the eye, and their extreme minuteness by two lines bent backwards. See fig. 4. It in- eluding our researches. It is to be observed, that habits marshes abounding in clay, where it remains when the unctuous moisture which covers the under ground pushing out its other extremity by scales of fishes is exhausted by the air, these anireason of its continual motion. When taken out males are not to be seen; nor are the fishes then it twists itself up. It is frequent in Sweden. noctilucous, that matter being perhaps their nou

5. NEREIS NOCTILUCA, the nożlilucous nereis, rishment when living, as they themselves afford food inhabits almost every fea, and is one of the causes to many marine animals. They do not mine in the of the luminousness of the water. These crea- day-time, because the solar rays are too powerful tures shine like glow-worms, but with a brighter for their light; however aggregate or immense {plendour, so as at night to make the element ap- their number.” Their appearance is particularVOL. XVI. Part I.

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