Elements of the Theory and Practice of Chymistry, Tom 1

Przednia okładka
A. Millar, and J. Nourse, 1758
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Strona 13 - Affinity but with one of the compounding fubftances only. To produce fuch an effecl:, it is fufficient that one of the two compounding fubftances have to the third body a Relation equal, or nearly equal, to that which it has to the other compounding fubftance with which it is already combined. Thence it follows, that two fubftances, which, when apart from all others, are incapable of contracting any union, may be rendered capable of incorporating together in fome meafure, and becoming parts of the...
Strona 6 - ... exposed to the power of the fiercest fire, must be considered as containing nearly all its earthy principle, and consisting chiefly thereof. . . . there is reason to think it very difficult, if not impossible, to obtain the terrene principle wholly free from any other substance. For after our utmost endeavours to purify them, the earths we obtain from different compounds are found to have different properties according to the different bodies from which they are procured, or else, if those earths...
Strona xi - ... uses but he also introduced the simple to complex structure in his Elements de chimie theorique (1749). «The general Plan of which I proceed is to suppose my Reader an absolute Novice in chymistry; to lead him from the most simple truths, and such as imply the lowest degree of knowledge, to such as are more complex, and require a greater acquaintance with Nature. This order, which I have laid down for my rule, hath obliged me to begin with examining the most simple substances that we know and...
Strona 9 - It produces no change in its state, whether of solidity or fluidity ; go that a solid body does not become fluid by the accession of the Phlogiston, and vice versa ; the solid bodies to which it is joined being only rendered thereby more apt to be fused by the force of the culinary fire. 3. We can convey it from the body with which it is joined, into another body, so that it shall enter into the composition thereof, and remain fixed in it.
Strona 13 - ... fubftances, without quitting each other, unite with the fubftance prefented to them, and form a combination of three principles : and this comes to pafs when that third fubftance has an equal, or nearly equal, Affinity with each of the compounding fubftances. The fame thing may alfo happen even when the third fubftance hath no Affinity but with one of the compounding fubftances only.
Strona 364 - ... and experiments as might tend to facilitate the art of making fteel, and others near akin, to it. Thofe writers upon the...
Strona 12 - ... from their union partake of the properties of thofe " fubftances which ferve as their principles. " Fourthly, The fimpler any fubftances are, the more " perceptible and confiderable are their affinities : whence " it follows, that the lefs bodies are compounded, the " more difficult it is to analyze them ; that is, to " feparate from each other, the principles of which " they confift, " Fifthly, If a body confift of two fubftances, and to " this compound be prefented a third fubftance, that "...
Strona 1 - The Object, and chief End of Chymistry is to separate the different substances that enter into the composition of bodies; to examine each of them apart; to discover their properties and relations; to decompose those very substances, if possible; to compare them together, and combine them with others; to reunite them again into one body, so as to reproduce the original compound with all its properties; or even to produce new compounds that never existed among the works of nature, from mixtures of...
Strona 308 - ... with the liver of sulphur through the pores of filtering paper. If an acid be poured into a solution of this combination of gold and liver of sulphur, the acid unites with the alkali of the ' hepar,' and the gold falls to the bottom of the liquor along with the sulphur, which doth not quit it. The sulphur thus precipitated with the gold is easily carried off by a slight torréfaction, after which the gold remains exceedingly comminuted. " The sulphur of this compound may also be destroyed by...
Strona 12 - All the experiments hitherto made concur with daily obfervation to prove that different bodies, whether principles or compounds, have fuch a mutual Conformity, Relation, Affinity, or Attraction, if you will call it fo, as difpofes fome of them to join and unite together, while they are incapable of contracting any union with others. This effect, whatever be its caufe, will enable us to account for, and connect together, all the phenomena that Chymiftry produces. The nature of this univerfal affection...

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